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chrome-magnon man
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LBP2
(Long Belly Perry Poke)
by
Dana Sturn
speypages.com
copyright 2005 all rights reserved


A few months ago I was watching Nobuo Nodera’s new Speycasting video featuring Ian Gordon. There is some great footage of Nobuo casting on the River Spey and raising and hooking some fine Atlantic salmon. But what was most intriguing to me was the incorporation of what Ian called a “false cast” into Nobuo’s long distance casting. In one memorable scene Nobuo is working his way down a pool with a single Spey. Once the cast has been fished out, Nobuo strips in until the line is set up to load the rod for the forward cast. He then makes the first cast at about a 30° directional change but does not shoot any line. Then as soon as the line lands Nobuo picks it up again to make his fishing cast, with a final directional change from the initial pick up of over 60°. In the background you can hear Ian Gordon say “false cast” which I’d never really heard applied to a Spey cast before and it got me thinking.

For the past several years since learning about the Perry Poke from Skagit casting I’ve been doing a similar thing with long belly lines on the Thompson. When fishing the single Spey with a long line and wanting to change greater than 40° I’ll usually pick the line up and then lay it down again in a kind of long belly version of the Perry Poke to set myself up to make a “perfect” switch cast as my final delivery cast. This is an especially useful dodge on the Thompson’s Graveyard Pool where a strong upstream wind often makes accurate placement of your anchor during a single Spey near impossible.

Unlike Nobuo’s false cast that is essentially a completed forward cast that is then picked up again and switched into a long distance delivery cast, the Long Belly Perry Poke (LBP2) takes the line and sends it out in the intended direction of the forward cast, but like Ed Ward’s Perry Poke with a Skagit setup, mine does not extend the line, but rather folds it so that the last ¼ of the length of the head remains stuck to the water to form the initial anchor. Once the rest of the aerialized line has landed I then pick it all up to form the D loop of a switch cast, then fire the final cast out there, shooting line to add distance. This past fall on the Thompson kush and I noticed a few other fellows were doing something similar, but usually using a Snap-T or Circle Cast to do the initial line repositioning rather than aerializing the line in the upstream sweep of the classic Perry Poke. Still, the results were identical, with the line positioned for the final powerful switch cast.

The LBP2 takes practice, but anyone adept at the single Spey can get in with a few practice sessions. The version that uses the Snap-T/Circle Cast is even easier, and a skilled caster can master it in a few minutes.

Here are the steps for the LBP2 on river left for the right handed caster:

1. The line is on the dangle straight below you. Face your intended target with your feet positioned comfortably as you would for a single Spey.

2. Pivot your torso about your hips so that you are now facing downstream.

3. Strip in the running line until you have the head ready at your casting position for optimum rod loading and all the slack is out of the system.

4. Lift the rod in a smooth easy lift until your top thumb is about level with the top of your hat. Keep an eye on your rod tip: as you lift the rod tip should bend progressively as more line leaves the water, and stay bent throughout the entire casting cycle until the line is once again committed to the water.

5. Once the line has come off the water so that only the leader and perhaps a few feet of line remain “stuck” on the surface, without hesitating, sweep the rod upstream with enough power to cause remaining line and leader to leave the water and begin to travel upstream. Move your top hand with enough power to keep the rod bent and maintain the sensation that you are in contact with and therefore in control of the line. Continue your upstream sweep until your top hand arrives slightly upstream of your right shoulder.

6. Continue the movement of your top hand up and into your normal firing position for a forward cast, at the same time pivoting your body so that you are now facing the direction of your intended target.

7. As the fly passes you, bring the rod tip forward and down, executing a weak forward cast. This cast will have just enough power to propel much of the head of the fly line out towards the intended target, leaving the leader and several feet of line folded back on itself and pointing 180° opposite the intended target.

8. Once the line has landed on the water, move into your normal motions for a switch cast, lifting the line off the water, forming your D Loop and executing your forward cast, shooting your running line into the forward cast for your final delivery.

With this method it is relatively easy for a skilled caster to make comfortable directional changes with a single Spey even in nasty winds that would normally make control of the single Spey difficult. I guess you could practice really hard and make flawless, perfectly controlled single Speys instead…but why?

Of course, there is one drawback to the particular cast: like the original Perry Poke, the LBP2 tends to tear up a lot of water in front of the caster. If you are convinced that the fish you are after are out at the end of your long cast and swing, that’s not really a problem, but it will quite likely disturb any fish holding in closer to you. But salmon and steelhead are never really in that close anyways, right?

Here is some video of the cast:

LBP2

The Snap-T/Circle Cast version looks like this:

Long Belly Snap

Notice that throughout the casting cycle the caster (me) is very relaxed and there is very little effort involved in making the cast. This is because I am maintaining line tension throughout the casting cycle and not allowing any slack into the system.

As always, I am not laying any claim to the creation of this cast—it is simply a Perry Poke modified slightly to work with long belly lines.

And it works great!
 

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Dana
There are no links to the videos. Now, I just upgraded to Mac OS 10.4 . . . I sure hope THAT's not the problem.
Bill
 

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Not working in Scotland either but that is probably as it named LBP2 perhaps if it was called false cast in might work.

Is it an April fool ?
 

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Malcolm,

No it isn't a prank, the Long belly Perry Poke is very real and very effective! I found it especially so when I had a somewhat restricted area for d-loop formation as well as a need to make a long cast.

The control of the anchor that Dana refers to allowed me to easily and consistently place the anchor further out than normal which allowed me to form a large d-loop with little danger of smacking it on the rocks behind me. In that it was fantastic!
 

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Norwegian speyfanatic
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In Norway very many use a false cast on the underhand cast because they are not skilled enough to make a change of direction and shoot line in one cast. So they make the change of direction with a false cast without shooting line and then takes a switch cast to get the distance. In most cases this is lack of excersice and I hate fishing behind people who cast the false casts over where the salmon are holding. I could easy see however that the LBP2 could give some advantages on a long belly line since you don't need that much room behind you if you are not going to make a change of direction on the last cast.

I'm not so sure however if I would appreciate to folllow behind a caster who uses this method with an XLT line. I guess it will disturbe the fish more than necessary, at least if being used thougtless.
 

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McIntyre,

I agree with you - the important thing here is that you believe the fish are holding a long way out. If they were in tight there would be no need for the Perry Poke as the smaller d-loop would be fine in the constricted quarters.

Besides (and I say this with tongue planted firmly in cheek) you wouldn't want to waste your time fishing behind me anyways :lildevl:

Malcolm - I can't see it either - we will have to wait for Dana to get home and properly load the clip.
 

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chrome-magnon man
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
clips

I'm working off two machines and having some problems getting the video to play for some reason. Sorry about that! I'll keep trying, but won't have a lot of time to put together until the weekend.
 

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Norwegian speyfanatic
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kush said:
Besides (and I say this with tongue planted firmly in cheek) you wouldn't want to waste your time fishing behind me anyways :lildevl:
Don't you release your fish? :D

At least I think it would be quite educational.
 

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Th advantage of the speycast is that you do not get tangled in the undergrowth.
Throw your loops further out, I do it all the time in confined spaces off the bank etc, perhaps if I videod it and gave it a name it might become popular over there.

The Willie Wobble

Just having a bit of trouble with the video clip.
 

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Now, I just upgraded to Mac OS 10.4 . . . I sure hope THAT's not the problem.

If you were using Microsoft junk most likely, but not with Mac Tiger( 10.4)
 

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chrome-magnon man
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
video

should be working now. I'm not happy with the clips--bad lighting, line is pretty much invisible. I'll re-shoot over the next few weeks and post them again, but these will give you the basic idea. The line has a 80ft head.
 

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Got It, Thank You

I just viewed both and w/ my technical skill base that means an infant can now see the casts. Probably limited application casting, but good to know. I'm w/ Macintyre. I'm a great fan of single spey casting not only because of less water disturbance, but over the course of a long day, less casting / fatigue.
 

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Junkyard Spey
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and I hate fishing behind people who cast the false casts over where the salmon are holding.
McIntyre,

Since I've never been to Norway I may not be envisioning this scene right, but wouldn't these people mostly be making this "false cast" on water already covered by the swinging fly when the angler was stationed farther up the pool?

You may very well have a point on small waters but as I envision your statment I am placing myself on a favorite Clearwater pool (BIG water) where I used the LBPP before I knew what it was and I was not laying my line on any water that I was fishing. Any water being disturbed had already been covered.
 

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Norwegian speyfanatic
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MJC said:
McIntyre,

Since I've never been to Norway I may not be envisioning this scene right, but wouldn't these people mostly be making this "false cast" on water already covered by the swinging fly when the angler was stationed farther up the pool?

You may very well have a point on small waters but as I envision your statment I am placing myself on a favorite Clearwater pool (BIG water) where I used the LBPP before I knew what it was and I was not laying my line on any water that I was fishing. Any water being disturbed had already been covered.
MJC,

It's not any problem for the flyfisher who does the false casting, but for the poor guy who are next in line and has to fish on water that has been twice as much disturbed than necessary. If you have the run alone or there are plenty of time between each fisher, there is no problem.
 

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Junkyard Spey
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Got it. The water is being disturbed twice as much as with "normal" casting.

I must admit that I have become quite spoiled as the only time I fish behind another person is when I occaisionaly go with one of my friends. Not often.
 

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OK Wille

Well, Dana put his head down and the long Belly poke is now video compliant. Dana is too much the gentleman, but I am now anxious to see the "Willie Wobble" in video.
 

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LBP still wanted to be seen...

There are no links to the videos, computer says "the page is too old and may be it was deleted"
 
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