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chrome-magnon man
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XLT line chart

Way Yin (Scott Pro Staff, XLT line developer and world-ranking tournament caster) has compiled a list of XLT/rod matches on The Fly Fishing Shop website (yup, they are speypages sponsors!). You'll see the 1509 on there and since Way used Scott rods to develop the XLT lines you can be assured of a great match:

XLT chart

Simon Gawesworth has also tested the ARC rods with the Grandspey and you can see his recommendations here:

RIO chart
 

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One of my favorite combinations.The ARC 1509 is my primary 9 wt. And my favorite line for it is the XLT 8/9. When I use sink tips (especially with wind) I use an XLT 9/10. IMHO, the original GrandSpey 8/9 was too heavy to reach much distance (although it was useable in heavy winds) — it greatly overloaded the rod. I have one of the new GS 8/9s that I haven't had a chance to try yet (our rivers here are solid). I'm looking forward to casting it. As a floating line, you'll be pleased with the XLT 8/9.
Bill
 

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PiscatorNonSolumPiscatur
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I used several lines on the Arc 1509 when I had one. The original GS 8/9 was too heavy if you were using the full belly. It would throw it though. The original 7/8 was much better. The 8/9 XLT worked but I didn,t use it that much as I have been more of a GS fan. It's really more a matter of your personal prefernece in the type of long belly line you like. The rod will do either.
 

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PiscatorNonSolumPiscatur
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There are probably better descriptions of the differences between the GS and the XLT on this site than I could give. I have found them both to be superb flylines. For picking up and casting long lenghts of line they both are miles ahead of the old double taper lines. For me the XLT is much more delicate and has alot more finesse built in. It seems to keep on going effortlessly when you make the forward stroke, and at times it seems to almost cast itself. The GS is a more of a brute with alot more weight on the front section of the line. I often am dealing with wind and have found the GS to be better in those situations. If there is no wind the XLT is a very fun and easy line to cast. I'm sure there are guys here who use the XLT in wind and do quite well. Ideally you could try both lines out before buying one.
I have yet to try the new GS lines so can't comment on those.--My name is close on the list though!! I am guessing they will be in the middle ground somewhere.
Anyway, in my opinion the Arc 1509 does both lines well. It's just a matter of some subtle and not so subtle differences and personal preferences.
GB
 

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I would second Bill's choice of the 8/9 xlt for floating work. I have the 9/10 and it can be a bit heavy on the 1509 but got it mostly to throw tips and this it does like a champ!!
 

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Robert- I cut it at the 26 foot mark and just put in loops. I have a number of tips from past combo lines from type 3 to type 8 as well as a Big Boy and T14 - they all cast easily on the rod with that line

Rick J
 

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Don't forget the Mid-Spey

Robert

There's one last combination that needs to be added this list. The Mid 7/8.
Really! don't leave home without it...

Tom Hill
 
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