Spey Pages banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,095 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We gave our oldest son a Llama wool dubbing set/gear for his birthday in August. Since then he has been on the learning curve tying Llama Wool flies for Striper Fishing in the California Delta and the ocean.

He had some very successful flies with normal striper tying materials. However yesterday at the Striperfest on the Delta, his flies and his techniques enabled him to catch 30 stripers with one of them in the high teens. That was inspite of being a host "Captain" for another fellow, which meant that my son drove the boat and let his guest have the bow and first and last cast.

Some of the big names at the Striper Fest either got skunked or had a few fish day.

My son feels the Llama wool metal dubbing wires, he makes and in turn makes flies from the dubbing wires is an incredible breakthrough for the Delta and the Ocean fishing. I hope to tie a few for steelhead fishing this fall winter.

You East Coast Striper addicts might want to consider Llama wool dubbing for some test flies.;)
 

·
Mr. Mom
Joined
·
625 Posts
Yeah, they do work well. Jay Murakoshi's llama baitfish has been killing in the delta, and in inshore saltwater since he "introduced" them a couple years ago. He used to sell a popsicle made with LLama brushes for steelhead and salmon, but I guess they didn't sell well because they seem to have been dropped from his site. That hasn't stopped me from making a few steelhead patterns for my own use which are still in R&D:devil:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,095 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I'm a luddite and don't have digital camera

Besides not having a digital camera, my son won't take me fishing with him and let me use his new flies if I dared to post a picture of them.

I will say that they are green, light brown and white on big silver hooks. :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
"they are green, light brown and white on big silver hooks."

sure, I know those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,095 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Philster re Llama Hair

What kinda bites on this whole thing. When I got back in to fly fishing and took a refresher fly tying course a little over 10 years ago, some friends, a couple, had several llamas. The wife offered me all of the llama wool I could gather. It was what came off on the fences, gates and barns, they didn't want me lassoing one and do some shearing.

So what I got was their shedding, which was like thirds or worse. I had no idea of how to use it except to wrap it around a hook in a very crude dubbing brush, and my pieces were not as long as what is sold now..

Still I ended up with a couple of fuzzy brown and black or greyish funny looking flies. They caught fish, and I could not convince the couple to let me shear some llama wool unless I bought one for several thousand. I said no thank you. Those flies are still around. Later the couple sold all of their llamas.
 

·
Mr. Mom
Joined
·
625 Posts
I hear ya PoppySpey! I have similar stories with Peacock and wide variety of pheasants and other exotics(friend worked at the San Fran Zoo) , and macaw parrots. Wrong time, wrong place, hesitant owners... :hehe:

But LLama hair is now available like Crazy! Jack Cook at River Run Anglers ( a sponsor!) has even offered to dye llama in whatever color I want!

Awesome stuff for winging steelhead patterns, especially Swedish long wing types. Still trying to find something better AND legal for those swedish flies. Haven't yet, dont' know that I will!
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top