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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
LL bean has some new rods, the Streamlight series, available in 7/8, 8/9, and 9/10. Complete set-ups include reel, SA Mastery Spey, backing, leader...

AND the ad copy says these rods work as both Spey and over-head casters.

Anyone try these yet?

I'm new to the board--found it through flytalk--and have been "gifted" a budget for my first spey rod. I look forward to your answers!

Thanks!

Tom
 

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Tom,

Welcome to the site. I have no experience with Bean rods nor do I remember much buzz here about them but I am sure some of the regulars can point you in the right direction. Since you are local to Seattle might I suggest driving out to Carnation for one of Speybum's Saturday mornings on the water or coming up to Kaufmann's get together in a couple weeks on the Sky. You will get a chance at either to cast a number of rods and decide what works for you. Depending on what you find, another suggestion is getting in touch with Mike at Redshed and seeing about demoing a rod. No matter which way you go, you have some very savvy resources/shops that also happen to sponsor this fine site.

sinktip
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Sinktip!

Yes, I am aware of the Saturday thing in Carnation, and as soon as my schedule permits, I'll be out there.

I had the pleasure of fishing with Juro Mukai (the CND rep) on Cape Cod last October... and the pleasure of fishing with both of the Atlantis series rods. I look forward to trying some their spey rods, too.

The Bean rods caught my eye when I saw the latest catalog. I did a forum search here, but nothing came up.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Loved both of them, especially since I'd never thrown a two-hander, and in the sideways remnants of hurricane Jeanne, no less!

The heavier one was more effective, given the conditions, but the lighter one (9/10) was a dream! Both rods were set up with shooting heads, about 30' of type iii or so. The heavy-eyed, 1/0 sand eel was no problem.

Another rod, called the Pacifica, is in the works for use on our Puget Sound cutts and sillvers.

Tom
 

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Not sure how much feedback you will get about the bean rods as they are not readily available for us west coasters except by catalog order. I know cabelas has St. Croix do thier rods for them and I wonder if LL Bean is outsourcing thiers as well. Will send an email to try and find out.

In the meantime what is your budget? I sure we can all reccomend some 2 handers in your price range that will be avail for you to actually get some test casts with before you buy.

-sean
 

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L.L. Bean Streamlight Two-Handed Rods

I have cast all of the new L.L. Bean Streamlight Two-Handers (12'6" for #7; 13' for #8; 14' for #9). They are Medium to Medium-Fast in action.

The new LLB Streamlight Two-Handers are the closest thing to the Loop Yellow Line Series that I have cast.
 

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Hi Tom: I cast the L.L. Bean Streamlight 2-handers both Spey and overhead. All three rods are very smooth; and the price is hard to beat.

The L.L. Bean rods remind me a lot of the Loop Yellow Series; as the Loop Yellows really suit my style of two-handed casting, I also really enjoy the L.L. Bean Streamlight 2-handers. Cheers, TB
 

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Topher:

The LL Bean rods are on my short list under consideration for my first spey rod. I'm curious to your impressions of how stout their 7wt and 8 wt rods are? For example, when compared to other rods, are they especially hefty or light for their line rating? In general, I tend to prefer slightly lighter rods but I don't want to be undergunned for chasing Oregon Steelhead. This will also be my first spey rod, so I don't want to deny myself of the advantages by buying a rod that is too light or too short.

I'm hoping to find the opportunity to cast them, but any thoughts you might have in this regard would be appreciated.

Thanks
Barry K.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Concerning overhead vs. spey...

It would be nice to find a rod that works well--very well--for both styles, with the only changes being the lines (spey lines and tips for spey, shooting heads for overhead).

Do you think the Bean rods--or any other rod--fit the bill?

Tom
 

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If the bean rods are like the loop yellow they will not be that great for overhead. The mid section is not stiff enough to allow a clean pull of the water for an overhead backcast.

Look at the loop blue or green series in the shorter lengths if you want a rod that can do both. T&Ts will go both ways as well but may be out of your price range.

There is no such thing as a rod that will do both very well. You will have to compromise and it is usually on the overhead side of things where the compromise happens. That is why I have separate rods for both applications.


-sean
 

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Hi Tom and Barry,

The Bean Streamlight rods are fairly stout: the 12'6" for a #7 is a #7/8; the 13' for #8 is an #8/9; the 14' for #9 is a #9/10. The rods that I tested were lined with the S.A. Short Head in the above line designations. During my overhead test casts, the rods threw the entire S.A. lines with the backing knot to the second stripping guide.

In my opinion, a two-handed rod does not know the difference between a load placed on it by a Spey cast or a load placed on it by an overhead cast. Any rod has a reasonably optimum bend profile; it is up to the caster to discover that profile and adapt his/her technique to accomodate the physical characteristics of that profile.

Personally, I love the Loop Yellow rods for overhead casting. It is a very smooth rod for both Spey casting, Underhand-style casting, or overhead casting. I do cast them a little differently than, say, the CND Atlantis or the G. Loomis Stinger GLXs. This is as it should be: it is all a matter of subtly adapting one's default casting stroke to suit the requirements of a new rod in hand. Even the old Sage 9140-4 'brownie', not considered an ideal overhead rod by most standards, can absolutely bomb overhead casts in the right hands.

For my purposes, the L.L. Bean Streamlight 13' #8/9 wt. is the most versatile rod in the series. It has the length and the authority to handle longer casts and a good push of water, but is not so long that it will be cumbersome on smaller streams.

Tight loops, TB
 

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Even the old Sage 9140-4 'brownie', not considered an ideal overhead rod by most standards, can absolutely bomb overhead casts in the right hands.
Topher I agree on grass any spey rod will bomb casts or in ideal situations. However if you are standing knee deep in crashing waves trying to lift a sinking shooting head straight out of the water and into a clean back cast and fire without successive false casts you cannot do it with a traditional spey rod. Well to say you cannot do it is wrong but you are going to be working awful hard compared to a T&T 1212, CND 1111, or the TFO 1212. Reverse can be set with these overhead double handers. Sure they can spey cast OK but it is more work than it is worth to me.

Have seen many guys (including myself) really struggle out there cause the rod was too soft in the mid section to allow that intial lift to really pop out of the water.

It sounds like the Bean rods are nice ones though and if we ever see them on the west coast I wouls like to give them a rip as I do love the loop yellows, just not for beach casting :lildevl:

-sean
 
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