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loco alto!
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The WC 8/9/10 cut at 15' is good for generic 9 wt tips with average flies.

For big flies, I prefer a WC 9/10/11 (or SA 8/9 short head) cut back farther, leaving 27' of belly + 2' of rear taper + 15' 10 wt tips. If you go this route, start with belly length around 32'. Try it, and cut back incrementally to a point that suits your stroke. A WF13F cut 29' - 32' (around 440-480 gr) works just as well. If you like a REALLY deep load, for continuous load casting, bump it up to a WC 10/11/12 or SA 9/10.

A RIO Skagit requires use of a short cheater section, which adds another loop to loop in your working line. I prefer to cut back a standard short belly spey line as described above, its a cleaner fishing tool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I just got the rod and need to figure out if i should throw a windcutter 7-8-9 or the 8-9-10 on this rod. I know the 7-8-9 is a little light as far as grain weight for this rod. That being said, reccomended grain weight 550-700. Is 8-9-10 a better fit and should it be cut back a bit. Mainly going to use this rod to fish tips. Might look into a skagit line in the future. Any help?
 

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loco alto!
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WC 7/8/9 dry
WC 8/9/10 tips (mine is cut at 15')
 

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Jason
here is another perspective. 10,11,12 windcutter cut back 20' from the front with 12' 10wt tips or 15' of 9wt for the smaller flies. I was using this set up on the skagit with weighted loop tubes that had ample amounts of bunny and marabou and in my opinion was not taxing the rod a single bit. It was a joy to cast and has become my short head line of choice on that rod. Also have been playing around with some of the guideline heads in the 9/10 range and have been pretty impressed with these as well, especially there hover head with a sinking poly leader on the front.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So if i took a windcutter 8-9-10 ans cut it back 15' would i just remove the last section of line whee you would connect your floater or sink tip? Any ideas? I have never really messed with lines before other than what comes in the box. Thanks for all the help.

Jason
 

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I think they are saying if you buy a floating WC, cut it at 15' to make your own tips. If you buy a wc with tips-no cutting.
 

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JD
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What they are saying

drbfish said:
I think they are saying if you buy a floating WC, cut it at 15' to make your own tips. If you buy a wc with tips-no cutting.
If you buy a WC tips and use it as is, there will be two loop to loop connections. If you buy a heavier (9/10/11) WC tips line and remove the #2 (center) tip section, you then have a de-facto Skagit line compllete with tips. One loop to loop conection.

Or you can buy a WC floating line (much less $) and cut it back, or not, to your liking. Make your own tips, to your liking. One loop to loop connection.

Or buy a Skagit line. These do not come with tips. You make your own, use what you already have, or buy them separately. One loop to loop connection.
 

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loco alto!
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JD's suggestion to use a WC 9/10/11 factory tips line with both front sections removed won't work well. The line would be only 23' long + 15' tips. A little too short, and way too light.

My WC 9/10/11 is 29' long + 15' tips. At 550 gr, it is on the light side of the grain window for this rod.
 

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JD
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De-facto Skagit line

What I said was remove the center, tip #2 section. I said nothing of discarding tip #1. It (floating, sinking, whichever one you want to use) gets re-attached to the main belly. So that you have shortened the original windcutter line by 15 feet. If that is too short, then you would have to use a cheater to make up the difference. As to whether, or not, it would come in at the proper weight, you go to Rio's website and figure it out for yourself. And you may still have two lop to loop connections (if using a cheater section). Not the way I would go but, if you are not into cutting and splicing, it is a workable alternative. Expensive, but workable.

For a 13'-9" rod a 3X to 3.5X Skagit line would be 41.25' to 48.125' long, including tip(s). Not that a Skagit line was in the original inquiry, but that is what it would be.
 
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