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I know there is going to be a new standard for lines so maybe this question will be addressed by the new standards, but maybe not.

Why doesn't the line wt correspond to the weight of the line? The wind cutter 6/7/8 is only 380 grains and the Airflo delta long 6/7 is 550 grains. That does not make sense to me. BUT, I guess it does, because my rod likes both lines (which I don't understand, either). It seems like if the airflo, at 170 more grains, loads the rod then the wind cutter would be to light, but it loads the rod just fine.
 

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loco alto!
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Hi Dave

Windcutters have an unusual history where different lines were spliced together - so that a WC 6/7/8 combined pieces of 6, 7, and 8 wt lines into one. Without a spey standard, it must've made sense to simply name the line by its components.

the WC 6/7/8 is 455 grains (the WC 5/6 is 365 gr). But your point is well taken. Usually a rod can carry more grains when those grains are spread over a longer line. The explanation lies in grains/ft, Peter's casting weight, and the longer strokes used to cast long belly lines.

For example, on my 13' 5/6/7 (yes, I finished the rod - thanks for the spacing you sent) I like to use a custom splice line that weights 580 grains over a 70' head. It loads wonderfully and still has power to shoot. A WC 8/9/10 is 585 grains over 54', but it completely overloads the rod and doesn't cast well. The gr/ft are too high for the short stroke that Windcutters use.

I will let you try the line next week at Sandy and we can compare notes.
 
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