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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The other day I viewed part of a TV show ( a Canadian production, Bob? was fishing with an older gentleman named Red Fisher) in which the narrator said(I think he said) that there was a limit on some Canadian streams designated as catch and release streams, and the limit was that once the angler had caught and released two fish a day in the designated streams, said angler was considered to have "limited" and could not fish any more in that stream on that day.... is that accurate? where are such streams located? This was quite revloutionary thought in my view, and I had never heard of the regulation(or even the concept) before, and since I consider myself pretty well-informed on these type subjects I am wondering if I heard it correctly?
 

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Hi Bee,

I have never heard of this on the west coast but have seen it on some of the Gaspe' rivers in Quebec for Atlantic salmon.

Greg
 

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Bee,

Greg is of course correct. In the Gaspe it is considered part of there code of ethics and is not a true law. The code of ethics also includes such things as rotating pools, not dead drifting to salmon and just treating other anglers and the fish with respect. They are usually posted at the ZEC and on signs near the river. If you are caught violating the code of ethics you will not necessarily be arrested, but you may find your fishing privileges revoked for the river you are fishing.

Charlie.
 

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While fishing for Atlantic Salmon in Newfoundland the guide told me that once a person landed four fish in a day they had limited out for the day and had to stop fishing(I also read it in the regulations). As all visitors have to hire a guide to fish Atlantics in Newfoundland when the guide says your are done thats it your done.




Ian
 

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Atlantic Salmon Regulations!

Allow me a minute to vent. The regulations throughout atlantic Canada require some refining. Here in Nova Scotia, DFO controls the system that issues sportfishing liscenses with 8 tags to allow anglers to retain grilse. The number of tags issued by DFO is 18000 across this province. The ENTIRE RUN of atlantic salmon in all of the rivers in NS combined would not equal 15000 fish. Most of our healthy rivers maintain a run of mostly multi-seawinter salmon that attract anglers from New England to fish the Autumn Runs. The entire run of grilse would probably equal about 5000 fish. I do not understand that logic. Considering the collapse of the Bay of Fundy rivers, the St. Mary's, the LaHave, etc... ,the government should have a 100% catch & release policy.
In Newfoundland, they have staggering runs of fish and their tag/retention system is now related to the river that you are fishing on, they have classified the rivers and are controlling the catch according to the health of each individual river. So in that province there seems to be some understanding of the species.......Except when it comes to catch and release.
There is no option for a catch/release liscence (same in NS). You are required by law to stop fishing after releasing twice your daily limit. That's 4 fish.
The reasoning behind this is unclear, at least to me, but I can guess that it isn't based on any science of the species.
In Russia's Atlantic Salmon Reserve, the guides record every fish. Weight, length, scale sample, and insert a tag. They record multiple hook ups with the same fish each year, and the record for one greedy salmon is 6 times in one season.
For the rest of us on this side of the Atlantic; bring pliers & clip your flies at the bend of the hook, or use 3lb tippet & have "bad luck".

At least until the regs change.

All the best,

Chris
 

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Chris, it costs DFO and Gov't $$$$'s to care,,, so therefore they don't!!! The tags issued to actual run ratio just hammers this point home!!! In light of the recent "hush money" "buy off",, or whatever you want to call it,, the ASEF is probably the last bit of help to come from them(IMO).
As for your 100% C&R policy??? It only stands to reason that if they(DFO) want to wash their hands financially then why not implement regulations that best serve the species in question!!!! C&R is a win/win for Gov't.
PEI has a two fish limit and your day is done. As a matter of fact, I was "done for the day" at 12:04pm this afternoon after releasing my second grilse. I would have liked to have had the four and your done reg's but i guess two made me quite happy :smokin:
There was a lad on the Margaree two octobers ago who landed 7 one day and he caused quite a stir,,, guys wanted to hang him!! That's a bit greedy in my opinion. I think 3 fish released is a good stopping point.
Salmon Chaser
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I agree with Dwayne on the notion of 3 fish being caught and released on a river/pool/sector being a reasonable limit. We limit our clients to 3 fish landed per day (if someone gets cute and starts "losing" fish we use our discretion). I will also say that when this happens (3 fish in a pool/sector/river) we will offer to take our client to another river if there is space available. This is not a common occurance but does happen a couple of time per season.

Charlie, I am not sure if you are referfring to zec water or private water (clubs or camps) when you suggest that someone may lose fishing privliges for the day if they exceed 2 fish for the day. It is not possible for anyone to lose fishing privilges for zec water based upon the number of fish caught and released in a day. However, there are camps and clubs that will stop an angler after 2 or 3 fish (depending upon the camp or club) and if the angler refuses he will likely not get an invite in the future.

There has been some talk about putting a regulation into place on a number of fish that can be released in 1 day by an angler but as of now I do not think there is anything in the works regarding this in Quebec.

Bill Greiner
Malbaie River Outfitters
 

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Point taken!

Very good opinions by two well respected anglers. When angling on our home rivers, I would count myself fortunate to be in a situation where I had to stop.

All the best,

Chris
 

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I am in favor of limiting the number of atlantic's hooked/landed per day as a sensible conservation measure, however, is anyone aware of any data that supports this method? Also, at some point the sport will have a diminishing fan base if the "limits" become too extreme. Atlantic salmon need as much support as we can give them and this issue seems somewhere between emotion and science.

Marc Gignac
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So much of this depends on the status of the targeted fishery .. Personaly, I doubt the trout and non-atlanic salmon resource is harmed much if you released ten fish a day as opposed to two or three...the manner in which the fish is played and landed and , perhaps as importantly , released, will have a lot more to do with protecting the resource than the "numbers" if you ask me...so what is next: a time limit on how long you can play a fish? No pictures of released fish, as it interferes with a quick release?...I mean this thing can get a bit nutty if "logic" is taken to its conclusion....do not mean to start a tempest, but I think limits on CR in a non-atlantic salmon resource is potentially a play in the direction of the "antis". I will be honest and say that if I had to stop at two or three released fish a day it would certainly stop a lot of my traveling around north america to fish other waters...I guess i still have too much "hunter gatherer" in me to be quite THAT politically correct...not that I kill any fish in saltwater flats, lake or stream(if Ican help it)... interesting discussion .
 

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CNR limits

Disclaimer: I'm not an authority on Atlantic salmon or the fisheries in that part of the world. I work with Pacific salmon, steelhead, and occasionally trout.

A CNR daily catch limit isn't biologically indicated as a general rule. To the extent we have good information on CNR steelhead fisheries in the PNW, incidental mortalities are estimated at around 5% by many managers, and we often use 10% to be conservative. If incidental mortalities are high due to heavy fishing pressure on a population containing few surplus fish, the management response would typically be to close the fishery.

If a CNR daily catch limit isn't biologically indicated, it might be socially desirable to spread out the available angling opportunity among as many participating anglers as possible. It doesn't take long to see how messy this social engineering can become. It's often said by experienced anglers that 10 or 20% of the fishermen catch 90 or 80% of the fish, due mostly to better skill and somewhat to better gear and other factors. More than a few anglers are absolutely and totally opposed to management attempting to socially re-distribute catch, even in a CNR fishery. And it's tough, because such regulation is an attempt to enforce an ethic, and identical ethics, including sporting ethics, are not universally held by all sportsmen.

I think it's impossible, even if it were desirable, for government to enforce CNR daily catch limits. However, private camps and guide services are free to voluntarily do so, and far more likely to be effective.
 

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Hi Marc:

The discussion in Quebec pertaining to how many salmon should be caught and released per angler per day has never focused on scientific data. Rather, it has been a debate that has had some elements of emotion and others of jealousy.

When you guys come back in August I would be happy to go much more in depth on these reasons. You are coming up during the full moon and with a bit of luck we may be discussing this in the context of your fishing! Your day at the Falls with the 2 fish was pretty good for the 1st week of June!

All the best to you and Gina,

Bill Greiner
 

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Hey Bill,

I'm looking forward to August as well and as you've pointed out, I have a fabulous memory for my first venture into the sport of Atlantic salmon. Being as conservation is always foremost on our minds these days, it sure would be nice to know that our self imposed code of ethics has a positive effect on the salmon population. I catch up with you soon!

Marc Gignac
 
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