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loco alto!
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Discussion Starter #1
I'll try this post again, more succinctly.

Are light tipped spey rods more finicky than heavy tipped rods?

Especially with regards to having the D-loop aligned 180 degrees opposite from the forward cast?

I understand that its always good to have the D-loop 180 opposite, for any rod, but I'm most interested in how rod design affects the need for precise casting technique.
 

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Pullin' Thread
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I'm not sure what you mean by light-tipped or heavy-tipped spey rods. I'm sure I'm not the only one. My inclination is to think you mean heavy line and light line rods; but I susect that is not what you mean.
 

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loco alto!
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2,979 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
no, I don't mean light line vs heavy line rods.

I mean a rod with a heavy slow beefy thick tip versus a rod with a light quick tip - all other things being equal. The rest of the rods taper could be identical.
 

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Pullin' Thread
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Despite the fact that you can have a heavy tip section that is fast or a light tip section that is slow, it sounds like you are looking for info on soft, slow rods versus fast, stiff rods. The short answer is no, it doesn't make any difference for making good casts. The anchor always needs to be 180 degrees opposite where you wish the cast to land.

The slow rods have a slight built in "compensation mechanism" for the anchor placement because if the anchor is not 180 degrees opposite where you want the cast to land, the slowness of the rod will pull the anchor into position as you start your forward spey motion. The faster rods will not do this very well because they will be pulling the line from the water much more quickly. However, this compensation the slow rods provide still does not make up for not having the anchor placed properly and in fact, removes energy from the cast.
 

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loco alto!
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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
flytyer

thanks for your input - I'm still curious what others think. Even though you say no difference and a good D-loop is best (of course!!), you also say that the slower tip rod will naturally pull the anchor (D-loop) into alignment for the forward cast.

So, the slower tip rod is less finicky to having exact 180 degree alignment. And that point is very helpful. thanks again.
 

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it's my opinion that a rof with a light tip is an improper design concept and here is why.

There is more graphite in the butt section of a rod than in the tip. As a result the butt has more ability to build and store energy that does the tip ( more graphite= more stored energy). Therefore you want the load to be transfered to the butt section so you can generate more power and to generate it with less work from your arms.
In my opinion you want a tip that is heavy enough to force the load down the rod into the more capable sections of the rod.

Rods with light tips cannot do that and you end up casting using only the rods tip. Though it may feel sweet in your hand at close range you'll end up expending more energy over the cource of the day with the light tip than the heavier tip.

All that said this has nothing to do with the rods action heavy and light tips can be made on fast and slow rods. For instance the old Sage 9140-4 the steelheaders standard is a very slow rod but it has a heavy tip and therefore lots of power.. The Sage 9141 if a much faster rod but still has a heavy tip..

I just think rods with heavier tips transfer energy down into the rod where it can me more effitiently used..

As far as how a rod will cast I think it's all a matter of getting to learn how each rods responds and learning how to make it do what you want.
 
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