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AussieSpey
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6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to learn the above with a scandi line.

The line I have is a Rio Scandi which is 37 ft. I'm not doing too well with it. The main problem is getting a light anchor so the cast doesn't get bogged down.

I am thinking that it might be easier to start with the underhand style (i.e. Goran Andersson). It seems to me that to cast this way you need a significantly shorter line (around 23 ft for a 14 ft rod). LOOP and Rio both make heads this size but they talk about putting tips on them which would extend them out to over 30 ft. I suppose this might work if you can anchor the tip but wouldnt that make the anchor too heavy?

Hopefully someone can enlighten me.
 

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3,495 Posts
I suspect your line is not the problem. I think you can find the answers in the pages, videos and explanation on Robert Gilespies site. The inclined lift is critical.


Video tape yourself and compare to his videos.

Slow down, then go slower. That can’t be emphasized enough, and will probably only make sense long after you’ve actually figured it out.
 

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Broken Down Spey Freak
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2,703 Posts
It's not about gear, it's about technique. Better that Goran Andersson for videos and explanations is his buddy Klaus Frimor. That is if it's "underhand" casting you set on.
Aside from SLSS's advice I would say get lessons. Money well spent.
 

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Hacker
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646 Posts
Lessons are the best advice you can get. As far as videos, look for Bruce Kruk's stuff to go with the climbing curve videos mentioned above. There are all kinds of casts out there, but to me nothing beats singles and snake rolls.
 

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Meiser, Sage, Beulah, Hardy, Lamson
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204 Posts
I have followed LinespeedJedi on Youtube and Vimeo for lots of help.

37' is a standard length line for rods 13'+ perhaps. A short or compact (31-33') is easy to learn with. IMHO a longer rod is easier to learn with also.

With a sticky anchor, keep the line energized and ABL- always be lifting!
 

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One more cast...
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222 Posts
Lots of good advice above. How is your switch cast? As far as line energy and anchor placement, I find if I go back and do a few switch casts, the single Spey gets better.
 
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Spey Is The Way
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1,181 Posts
Go to YouTube and watch "Turning A Switch Cast Into A Single Spey" by Deschutes Angler.

Leo
 

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Spey Is The Way
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1,181 Posts
Just watched the Topher Browne video. Wow. Hadn't seen that one before. Clearly explains what people have discussed (argue about) here for years. Excellent, thanks SalmonCane.

Leo
 

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That is a short and sweet casting lesson. Succinct, not a bunch of stuff to think about. It brought to mind something Whitney Gould said at a clinic. In this short video, which is more of an ad for Burkheimer than a casting lesson, she says the same thing as Topher -- lift and stay level as you rotate. You can see her in slow mo action.

The little tip that she told us, which has really helped me: At the end of the back cast (for lack of a better term) and just before executing the forward cast, with your top arm elbow at a 90, raise the hand (like you're flipping someone the bird, this was Whitney's tip) then drop it straight down by pulling your elbow to your body while pulling your bottom hand in to power the cast.

It's easily seen in the video.

And then watch her make a 140 foot single spey cast.
 

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Premium Member
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4,029 Posts
There is a recent Topher Browne video on YouTube regarding the single spey that helped me immensely. It was a simple tip, but it really made a difference.
He seemed extra authoritative in that video - then I realized he was wearing a tie with his waders! :)

It’s definitely a good starting tip.

The other one, already mentioned a couple of times above, is you should always get your timing and the correct anchor down doing switch casts first. Many, many switch casts. Everything about the basic required timing for a particular line and rod combination is right there in polishing your switch cast. And when you have it perfect, when you start to learn the turn you can do so a few degress at a time - one of those rare cases where you can learn something much harder in continuous gradations starting from something much easier. It’s “hard”, but no other Spey cast feels as effortless once you get it tuned in.

For me learning the SS is a little like the joke about quiting smoking - the smoker says “quitting is easy, I’ve quit hundreds of times!” I always end up going back to the beginning when I get out of practice, or change to a very different line. But getting back in tune is a lot quicker after the first time.
 

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Broken Down Spey Freak
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2,703 Posts
The problem with Simon's method is he is still promoting the "dip". This will send the line into the water prematurely making it more difficult. The "dip" is something that was done with silk double tapers. Likely needed then but not now. A good lift to target(as Bruce calls it) is all you need. When the leader lands fire!
 

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Meiser, Sage, Beulah, Hardy, Lamson
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204 Posts
The problem with Simon's method is he is still promoting the "dip". This will send the line into the water prematurely making it more difficult. The "dip" is something that was done with silk double tapers. Likely needed then but not now. A good lift to target(as Bruce calls it) is all you need. When the leader lands fire!
I think modern teachers suggest a flat or lifting sweep. If you are flat, there will be a slight dip due to tip flex. Just dont think about it :)

Here is Ian Gordon. He says flat sweep, as he remards the most critical part of the cast. You be the judge if he ignores the dip :) oh and there are no captions, English is nah his first language;)

Edit: A SS with a mid belly spey line is different to an underhand cast with a Scandi line. I even think 'stir the pot' promotes a slight dip (Frimor).

 
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