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Calman,

The search engine is your friend.
 

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I've got a new pair of Korkers and lovee them. Added the titanium stud soles and can fish the Clearwater "Greased Bowling Balls" with all the confidence in the world. No laces, just crank and go. Best pair I've had since my Bites.
 

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Ooooo so yes.

Looking to buy a pair of new boots are Korkers worth the money??
On my feet almost every time I walk into moving water. Wanted the Allie bar bottoms and they are harder to find than ... well never mind. :eek: Called them and shipment is due in a couple of weeks and credit card number is on file. JUST DO IT!

Kidding aside, there are boots and then there are Korker's. When it comes to wading conditions: "One size does not fit all" with what you need on the bottom of your boots.

fae
 

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Good boots from good guys. My two cents, however, is to wait until their 2015 line hits the shelves. They have a new boot coming out called the "K5 Bomber," which is a major step up for them in terms of foot protection and longevity. I have been testing the K5 boots for the last 6 weeks and am very impressed...and I've used and abused just about every prior Korkers boot model at one time or another.
 

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Save for the North Fork of the Umpqua ...

Good boots from good guys. My two cents, however, is to wait until their 2015 line hits the shelves. They have a new boot coming out called the "K5 Bomber," which is a major step up for them in terms of foot protection and longevity. I have been testing the K5 boots for the last 6 weeks and am very impressed...and I've used and abused just about every prior Korkers boot model at one time or another.
The Deschutes is my other PAY ATTENTION when wading river for 'old people.' Heck of a history as to why, and a darned good read. A 'contest' to see who could build railway tracks left the rest to follow with 'interesting times.' :rolleyes:
 

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Hate to disagree with some of the positive responses on this thread. I gave up on korkers several years ago - endless number of lost boot soles for me.
I know they've improved their construction and the method they use for rigging the soles on, but just last season my buddy showed up with a new pair (I forget which model) for our annual 2 weeks of salar fishing together. It wasn't more than 4 days before he lost one of his boot soles while hiking through the woods between pools. He checked his boots often (he'd lost soles from his previous pair or korkers and was paranoid), but it still wasn't enough.
My 2 cents is that any sole that isn't firmly glued and/or sewed onto the boot is going to come off during wear and tear, no matter how fancy the attachment system. You most certainly don't want to have that happen at a critical moment on a slippery rock in heavy current in the middle of the river. That is what happened with my buddies previous pair of korkers, and he thought he'd give them one more try. He's now binned all of his korkers and gone with permanent sole boots.
 

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Korkers makes quite a few boots, at varying levels of price and performance/durability. Some are better than others, though the top end ones are a bit pricey imo. The interchangeable soles I think are a great concept, and I take advantage of that to some degree. I have bought 4 pairs so far, and bought my wife a few pairs; so I think that's an overall endorsement. There are a few negatives in my mind which I do hope to see improvements on (they do seem to be making steady improvements with each season):

-the overall durability is a bit less than I would like, for the top end boots especially. I had a pair of the "Redsides" which were the least durable, though for $100 I thought it was about what is fair to expect.

-I am not a big fan of the BOA type lacing; while it is convenient when working properly, they are too prone to issues for me. Sand/grit will work it's way into the ratchet at some point and needs to be cleaned (frequently ime). Then there is the random accidental release, which I've only had once but my wife has happen at least a half dozen times. I pretty much only buy their regular lace boots now.

-I don't like that the two standard soles included with the boots are the two that I am least likely to use, particularly the "sticky rubber" (non studded). Between my wife's boots and my boots, we have a pile of the non studded "sticky rubber" (an ironic misnomer if there ever was). Landfill material, and added cost to to the product. I like that you can purchase the soles independently, wish that you could also purchase the boots with or without soles (or with the sole of your choosing).

-I have had ZERO issues with the soles coming undone ... when the boots were intact. Unfortunately, they depend heavily on a tab on the back of the boot which can (and usually does) come off pretty easily. You really need to baby this attachment, and in the donning and removal of soles it's easy to put a fair bit of torque on this fragile tab if you're not careful.

In short, I think they have a "good" product; not perfect, but very functional and enjoyable to use. Fit and performance is great, the "bang for your buck" I think is reasonable, though I would be a bit hesitant to spend the extra money on the higher end boots they make as I don't think the longevity is quite in line with the added cost. Yes they probably will hold up better than their low cost boots, but not much better (in my experience anyways).

HTH,
JB
 

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I beat the snot out of my Whitehorses last winter and this fall so far. I'm not very easy on boots and they're working great for me. I have a pair of Redsides too and they have held up well for their price. No issues with the Boa system, I love it compared to laces. Never had it pop open, get grit in it that doesnt rinse out easily, etc. No issues with soles coming undone. If they're pressed into the toe and the sole attachment points properly they shouldnt come out easy at all. Heck, I snapped one of the factory rubber soles trying to get it off by pulling down on it instead of prying inside to relive stress on the plastic sole. My fault, but that sucker wasnt coming off without a fight. I run them in a raft, wood drift, and plenty of bank fishing with no problems. The felt is sticky enough for the slime on the Methow and Wenatchee, works for me. The original rubber soles are garbage though, no traction at all.
 

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i really like the devils canyon boot

super light and comfortable

the alum bars are like velcro for your feet
 

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Korkers

I have been using them since they first came out as lace on sandals with carbide cleats for your boots on the Salmon River in NY. Have always like the concept of being able to change soles, what a great idea. My early pairs had issues with the soles not staying on, a trip to the Green River comes to mind were I had to duct tape them to my boots to keep form losing them. Last pair I bought two years ago had a much better sole attaching system to the boot and the cable lace up system. I thought that they had perfected the problems from the very poor earlier versions. So after saying I would try something else I bought Korkers again. These lasted to 2 years, if you wade in sand the sand gets caught in the crank, fabric wears under the cable and the latch on the back of each heal that holds the soles on came out of each boot. Also another problem they have always had is that they don't offer much ankle support and protection for your feet when hitting rocks. I always over looked that as I was interested in a lighter weight boot. Today I use Simms, sorry to be so negative but I am done with Korkers forever!
 

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In 18 years of guiding Ive seen lots of Korkers....and lots of lost Korker's soles...my current river has lots of mud, and it just sucks those soles right off. I wouldn't recommend....
 

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Korkers

I have the Chrome Boots and let me sum it up

1. Very light. If you walk a lot you will appreciate this
2. The carbide stud soles are the best gripping sole you will find. Period. I fish the salmon river often and even in 1200cfs they rock.
3. Never had any issues with them
4. Quick to put on and off
5. Keep my feet warm

Highly recommend as I have tried lots of different models and would not go back
 

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ive had two pairs, the first blew out in less than a season and the second lasted me 3 years of HEAVY hiking and use. They were the old style soles that were a pain to get on and off and I never ever had an issue with them coming loose, unless in a boat I always had the soles with the huge spikes on them (look like ice climbing boots or something) and it was crazy how well i could wade, My buddies would call me a mountain goat cause i could damn near run through any water or terrain....... All that said they were terribly uncomfortable and by the end of a long day i couldnt wait to get them off, now I wear simms boots and will never EVER buy anything else!
 

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Interesting thread to read/follow.

The early design of these boots left, to be polite, a lot to be desired... like a garbage can? Then they went back to the drawing board and 'We've got a good idea here, but the execution is more than a tad lacking?' :eek::rolleyes:

New design just works as advertised; the first generation was ... well, back to the garbage can idea. If you find an "original set,":saeek: take a PASS, new ones work very well. :smokin:

But like any wading boot take your waders/socks/etc., and put them on when 'sizing' the boot. You will be at least two up from your street shoe. Really nasty winter wading and you might be 'up three' for proper room to stuff all that inside.
 

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I'll add my 2 cents worth (mine are about 5 years old).

They are very light, I like the idea of interchangeable soles and have never had a problem with them, though they have seen limited use. As mentioned previously they come with the two sole options you are probably least likely to use. The studded sticky rubber soles work nearly as well as felt.

On the negative side they are very expensive and run terribly small. My foot measures out at a 12.5 so I usually wear a size 13, I ordered a 14 in the Korkers and they are at least 1/2" shorter than my Hodgeman's and my Chotas. After a week in Yellowstone with them I lost both big toe nails!
 
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