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I have an opportunity to purchase my 1st 2-hander CHEAP.
It'll be either a SAS 1308 or SAS 1409, both Scott's.
I have never spey fished before but want to.
I will use it around Great Lakes...mostly east & west Lake Michigan. Id like to fish eggs, mymphs, etc.
Can you give my your recommendation?
Thanks so much.
 

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That is a shame, indeed. I, too, am on the look out for my first two-hander, though my choices are between the TFO and Redington's model. Typically the responses would be rapid, but I think that there's some sort of meeting going on between the members that would typically answer this sort of question. Give them a couple of days, as I believe that they're simply away from their computers. The only advice I can offer is to cast both rods and speak with a Scott sales representative about which particular model would better suit the fishing you intend to do.
 

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fishchaser


Both are good rods in the medium to fast range. I have never fished in the great lakes area but seem to remember hearing the rivers are on the smaller side compared to the northwest rivers I fish. So on my waters the 1409 could be an excellent all around rod summer through winter. On smaller water it would be overkill and the 1308 would be perfect. Also what type of lines do you think you will be using to start? That will make a difference in rod choice.

Brian
 

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well...

This board is the greatest and I will tell you that right now.

Being from the Great Lakes I might be able to offer some assistance. The Scott SAS 1308 and 1409 are quite different. Both rods have their place, each are unique. The 1308 would be best for our region, a 9wt rod is simply too much unless you are fishing the largest rivers with heavy sink tips/heads and larger flies. Ideally, this might be a good rod for fall salmon. For nymphs/eggs with an indicator setup, the 1308 would be fine. Usually I will do this, since it works so well. Sometimes I just dead drift them and rely mending and line control instead of using an indy.

Other than that, take a look at the Temple Forks...I think they are a better buy then the Redington's.
 

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What you need to do first is decide if you want an all-around rod that can be used with smaller summer flies and large winter flies, or a rod that is best suited to summer fishing.

If you want the all-around rod for winter and summer fishing, get the 1409 because it will handle large flies much easier that the 1308. The 1409 would use an 8/9 spey line and the 1308 would use a 7/8 spey line, which is why one is best for exclusively using in summer.

And if you are planning on using the rod for kings, the 1409 is the one to chose, even though it is only marginally strong enough for kings.
 

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Why is the TFO better than the Redington, out of curiosity? I've spoken with numerous people out here on the East Coast, all experienced with two-handers, and it appears that I can't go wrong with either rod. I'm considering the Red rod over the TFO right now because I'm looking for striper duty with salmon and steelhead on the side, and the Red has a slightly faster tip action, which should help with casting into wind, and additionally a guy at TFO named Rick told me that the rod is actually better suited as an 8-weight than a 9 (on the 8/9 rods, obviously), which again isn't exactly what I'm looking for. Not to take away from the original post about Scott rods, just looking for some answers of my own. I believe that both rods will work well, however I think that the TFO with the softer tip will work better for steelies and the Red will work better for salt; therefore, Red leads at the moment... looking forward to your opinion... Thanks!
 

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well...

Some of the Great Lakes tribs are quite small, and a larger spey rod is not needed. You can get away with 6wt single handers, that is what I use primarily for steelhead, and the 12' 5wt Sage is going to be added to my arsenal for steelhead gear soon. You simply don't need that large of a rod unless you are fishing the larger rivers that we have few and far between of here. I own a 14' 9wt Loop Green two hander, and I rarley use it here. Mostly I use it in the surf for peirheads and deepwater ruks that hold staging fish. I will use it on only the largest rivers here.

Now, another thing is that our summer run fishery is quite different. We have skamania steelhead that run into a few select rivers, many of them small 20' wide ditches consist of limestone but have cool spring water flow. A spey rod here is not even worth a try. Other than that you got the St. Joe, the Big Manistee and a few Ontario tribs such as the Salmon River that support runs. A small run of fish exists on the St. Mary's, but that is a different story. All can be fished using spey techniques quite easily. Still you can't always depend on fishing summer runs like you would traditionally out west, usually it is more hit or miss as well.

I handle kings with my 7wt two hander quite easily, I know people who use 11/12wt two handed rods here in the Great Lakes, when our fish don't get nearly as big as the ones out west. Although they may be capable of casting farther and using heavier lines...I never had a problem fishing Michigan's largest rivers or any other large tribs in the Great Lakes.

The Temple Fork is more of a river rod, I didn't realize you were surfing with it. I used a Redington Two Hander in the surf and it was a great tool, I had the 13' 8/9wt. I could cast that pretty far as well, and it was a nice rod. It seemed to have a flat spot but that didn't affect it too much.

Hope all goes well!
 

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Sorry I can't address the original poster's question-I have never even seen a Scott rod.

On the TFO vs. RedFly, I have the TFO 12'6" now and used to have the RedFly 13. To my recollection of the Redington, both of these rods are similar in that they are a bit more full flex than is ideal for overhead casting, but both are very usable, espceially if you underline them for overhead casting. I think both of the rods spey well. I think the TFO is actually faster than the RedFly, and it is definitely finished better, ( Read: No plastic.)

flyfisha1 Chris, if you can contact me via e-mail I might have some information that would be of use to you.

Jay Horton
[email protected]
 

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Re: No replies

Sorry you didn't get any joy from that inquiry... but it could be that (a) not many have familiarity with that rod, (b) no one had anything good or bad to say about it or (c) the topic had been discussed thoroughly before and could have been searched. I am not saying it's any of these, but the possibilities exist...

My reason for not responding was (a) + (b) and the fact that I never fish eggs and nymphs in the GL style so can't comment on the applicability of a rod for that fishery. Of all the things it could be, I don't think there was any intent to disappoint.

Besides there is no better value than the CND Expert Series in 1308 and 1409 anyway :devil:

Fishchaser said:
My first post here and not one response to
my request for help. What a disappointment.
 

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Dan and Jay...

... Thanks for the information; I'll be testing a TFO this afternoon.

Chris
 
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