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Question for ya....once you have your prop installed (I use arctic fox underfur) and yougo to wrap in rhea,how do you get the fibers to sweep back over the prop, tips pointing at the hook, vs standing up at a 75 degree angle from the shank?

Does that make sense?

Thx!
 

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Matt Arciaga
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Dub Loop It

The absolute easiest way to make this happen is to put the rhea fibers in a dubbing loop, the stem of the rhea is pretty finicky it seems to always want to do this, here`s an example of what it will look like in a dubbing loop. Now obviously this application is limited to wrapping the dub loop over some medium length and density dub body.

The yellow "hackle" is rhea in a dub loop, it will always lay down. Oh Sorry, my representation is not an intruder...
 

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Dedicated Fisherman
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I think I get what you mean, I don't use a bunch of rhea but some. With this type fly I
generally like it if the fibers stand out, once it is sweeping along against the current they seem to lay back the way they should. To get them to sweep back at the vise tie them a bit ahead of your prop and then wrap backward on the fibers to lay them down.

I'm not sure this is a good representation but;


On that fly there is a prop behind the hackling and in the front I use a little lead wire and dubbing to tie everything backward a bit. You can also put a touch of lead under the prop and just use dubbing to tie your rhea back........ hope that helps some,

Ard
 

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I tie in the material bump, then fox, then rhea/amherst. I do not use dubbing loops, rather I tie them in strands of 3-4 at a time, alternating placement around the hook as I go. 12 o'clock, 6 o'clock, then 3 or 9 until it's in the round. One or two securing wraps. Then a turn or two of schlappen or such.

For me I like to soak then under a running tap of hot water to train the fibers. Then lay 'em on a paper towel to dry on their own. Once dried, I'll give them a liberal brushing every which direction with a tooth brush. I've never had bad luck with this routine and all of them inevitably take the sweptback shape I'm after.

Apologies for the oversized pics.




 

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Personally, If you're tying intruders, having the rhea come off at a right angle to the shank is just going to increase the amount of motion that fibre has, as it will have less opportunity to go pencil thin. It may not look smoking hot in your box, but if you have it coming off perpendicular, and nice and sparse, I would put money on it...

Give it a swim before you do anything.
 

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Not my photo, but should explain what I mean. Intruders are all about the illusion of bulk, and by purposely slimming them down, you might as we'll be tying string leeches
 

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fly fisher 'til it's over
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I'm with Ard and bbb on this one. I tie my inturders with as much flare as I can get so it has more profile when sweeping through the current.

It's more important that it looks good under water than in your fly box or hand.

The underwater photo bbb presented is awesome! If you looked at that fly when it was dry, I'll bet it looked like a frightened porcupine! :eek:
 

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I'm with Ard and bbb on this one. I tie my inturders with as much flare as I can get so it has more profile when sweeping through the current.

It's more important that it looks good under water than in your fly box or hand.

The underwater photo bbb presented is awesome! If you looked at that fly when it was dry, I'll bet it looked like a frightened porcupine! :eek:
Same here. The Intruder is anything but sleek. It is a big fly meant to create a big silhouette by way of prominent hackle segments. It's come a long way but it is originally much more sparse - relatively.

Leave the props out and the rhea will flow back - more of a leech than the Intruder.
 

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Yup, what your talking about is fly tiers esthetics. Put that fly in the water, you'll see how good it looks.
 

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fly fisher 'til it's over
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Nuria is the best material to support Rhea
Do you mean nutria, or is nuria something different? :confused:

I would think nutria would be a good dubbing ball behind Rhea or LA legs to make them splay out.
 

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I meant Nutria.
The fur is to slick for dubbing. You have to lay it in small batches and then spread evenly and tie with thin Veevus tread 8/0 or 10/0 . I like to use a vey light aluminum eyelets behind Nutria to keep it vertically to the tube.
 

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Dom
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Nutria is awesome material for spinning props! For easthetics soak the fly and let it sit for a good day damp or simply fish it. It will lay down within time.

I ditched using rhea and vent back to ostrich. I thin ostrich down by using same technique. Soak the feather in water and let it sit, soak again, repeat till barbucells (what?) retains its slim rhea shape. Ostrich is more mobile than rhea too and I find that will tie a more eye pleasing truder than rhea.

Anyways... moral is that by soaking certain flies will make them more eye pleasing.
 

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a more eye pleasing truder than rhea.


Human or fish eye ?

Most Rhea sold on the market is useless, however rare flat texture Rhea is superb.




Keep in mind that feather get softer in the water and the action in water which matters.

I personally like material which soak less water, and prefer to use sinking likes if need and tips to get the fly down, rather then adding a weight to the fly.



http://www.speypages.com/speyclave/showpost.php?p=1031850&postcount=24

http://www.speypages.com/speyclave/showpost.php?p=1035146&postcount=28
 

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Nutria uses.

High guys,

Here is how I use the Nutria: I use the guard hairs and tie them in against a brass bead(much better support then a dubbing ball). This will create a very nice wing support for materials that are soft and need to be supported, such as Rhea, Ostrich, Fur wings on temple dog style flies, etc. The Nutria is much stronger than feather hackle and will not collapse or wear over time; so your fly will retain it's volume. The guard hair can also be used on its own as wing material for smaller, sparse flies. The under furmakes a good dubbing. It is extremely soft and fine, and can be used for trout flies other, smaller flies, or bodies that you want to be "dense" or "defined" rather than "bushy", like you get with seal or snow runner dubbing.
You can view a step-by-step with the use of this support technique here:

https://www.quiet.ly/list/share/a03...8038565057594":"og.shares"}&action_ref_map=[]

or here:

http://www.skeenariverflysupply.com/2015/02/08/formula-1-novel-wing-support-method-jaap-kalkman/

Cheers,

Jaap
 

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As Jaap indicated brass ball is a great support solution. However, if one needs to lighten up on the fly's weight, having only the main front cone head, a super light aluminum eyelet ( <0.1 g) is a great option. It will keep dressing positioned during swing even more vertically to the tube if desired.

The longer Nuria hair 2.5-3" are also great for a lighter flies and move in the water, in combination with a Rhea, very well.

Also, the quality of various tying materials form Skeena River Fly Supply is incredibly difficult to match.
 
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