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Discussion Starter #1
Riveraddict's observation that bright flies seem to attract female steelhead got me to looking at my Intruders and inspired a couple of new ones
 

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How big

are those girl teasers?
 

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Victoria Secret for Intruders?

Very cute Kush - just don't put 'em in the same box as your Black and Purples or Who Knows :whoa: what will crawl out! :D :hihi:

And doesn't this go against the very concept of "Intruder"?? I mean what's the feminine "model" for this Intruder for the fairer sex - Anna Nicole Smith?? :saeek:
 

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Kush,
Any chance you could post tying instructions along with some step by step photos? I'm super intrigued by the pattern but am not exactly sure where to start.
Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Chris, check your PMs.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Here is one for the Boys...
(actualy the colour of this fly is black and purple - the purple shows much more as red in the photo - it is actually much bluer in person)
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
This recipe was once a closely guarded secret, but I checked with Ed about posting here and he said go for it "sharing is fun" - so here it is:

THE INTRUDER- by Ed Ward

Hook: I tie this on a tube - usually 2 1/2 - 3” long and use a
short-Shanked Partridge Nordic Single Spey #4

Ed uses quite a complicated but ingenious method. The
fly itself is tied on a straightened and cut-off 2/0
Mustad 36890 and the trailer hook is a #1 or 2 Diachii
2451. He then ties a loop of 25lb mono 1/4” from the
tip of the hook. Tie in oval gold tinsel and take 2
wraps in back of the loop and 1 in front (this flares the
loop out).

Rear
hackle: Tie in a long, soft, black hackle and take 3 wraps

Feelers: Tie in 9 strands of dyed orange ostrich plume on each side of the hook.
Tie in dyed orange ringneck pheasant tail and take 3 or 4 turns.

Body: Tie in a long skinny badger hackle and leave hanging.
Tie in burnt orange chenille and wrap forward to within
1/2” of the eye of the hook. Wind the badger hackle
forward ending with 3 successive turns at the point at
where the chenille ends. Spin a small clump of black
deerhair (this flares the front hackle) trim butts flush
with the shank. Tie in orange ringneck pheasant tail and
take 3 or 4 turns.

Shell: (I often vary the material) Tie in 2 cree hackles on
each side ofthe shank for “wings.” Tie in dyed orange
guinea hackle and take 4 or 5 turns.

Head: Tie in a small ball of black chenille. Tie in lead eyes.
Whip finish. Cover head with Aquaseal thinned with
Cotol.

Tying
note 1: Ringneck pheasant tails are split down the stem with a
single-edge razor, so they can be wrapped as a hackle.
Soaking the tail for 10 minutes in warm water can aid
in the splitting and wrapping process. (I strip the hackle by
soaking overnight in water with a few drops of hair conditioner)

Tying
note 2: Other species of pheasant tail produce different
appearances. Amherst is striking and I have used Silver
pheasant.

Tying
note 3: Try any colour combinations you like!

Rigging the Intruder: Ed rigs this like the British “needle-fly.” Pass your leader through the eye of the hook, then through the mono loop, then through a 1/4” long piece of 16 gauge electrical wire from which the wire has been removed. Tie the leader to the hook with a non-slip loop knot. Push the electrical insulation up onto the end of the hookshank and slowly pull on the leader to draw the knot snugly into the other end of the insulation, making everything pulls together with the hook point riding up.

I tie on tubes and it eliminates the complicated rigging, the same could be accomplished a Waddington shank. Originally Ed tied this on a large regular hook but was unhappy with the holding power as well as the potential for injuring fish and went to his present method.

I think that this is a brilliant pattern. It has a great profile and fantastic movement. As a steelhead pattern it is not a pattern everyone likes almost solely because of its huge size. I have always been partial to big flies for steelhead so it was not tough for me to accept!

I have begun to experiment with various colours and feathers, Ed himself says he rarely ties 2 the same - so have at it!
 

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Loop of mono

I have been fishing flies rigged like Ed's intruders too. Mainly simplified ostrich leeches. I, however, omit the loop of mono and lengthen the wire insulation to about 1/2" to 3/4".

The wire insulation keeps the leader next to the shank and at the rear of the shank so what purpose does the mono loop serve?
 

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Kush,
How much of a role does the spun deer hair play ? Do you think the water distortion is key in attracting the fish ? I'm also curious if you always include the pheasant tail or if you ever replace it.

Gillie
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Gillie,

The water distortion or vortex (Ed's term) is an important part of the fly's design. While I don't really think the collar does that on its own I feel it helps the front pheasant "hackle" stand out to create the distortion. I always use the pheasant for its stiffness. This results in the fly appearing to have bulk in the water while not really being bulky.The real value of this is evident when you see the fly in the water. The overall fly is not "wobbling like a plug" instead it is much more subtle. The ostrich in the tail of the fly moves in the vortex created by the pheasant and the fly looks positively alive.

Peter,
Yes, the Intruder represents a species of mayfly found in PNW rivers. It's a particularly voracious nymph that's hell on salmonid fry - which is why I think the Intruder illicits such vicious grabs from adult steelhead :lildevl:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yes that is right Peter...

Actually the Intruder falls into the shrimp/prawn category, but I think it is more of a squid thingy. The rationale is that these marine organisms are the steelhead's primary food source in the ocean and may very well be the last thing they fed on before they hit the river.

There may well be something to that concept, I an not really sure - I tend to think the fish are agressive/inquisitive and they just like to grab stuff.
 

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Artic fox tail, at the base of the fibers, has some pretty dense crinkly hair that is very bulky when dubbed and can substitute for the spun deer.
 

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Early Hatch

Kush,
This unseasonably warm weather has started those mayflies hatching early... I saw one fly away with a coyote tucked under its arms when I was upriver today.
 

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Been too long

since Ed's had a fish, he is hallucinating. It sounds almost like some of the stories you hear from Alaska and the size of the skeeters.
 

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kush said:
Tying
note 1: Ringneck pheasant tails are split down the stem with a
single-edge razor, so they can be wrapped as a hackle.
Soaking the tail for 10 minutes in warm water can aid
in the splitting and wrapping process. (I strip the hackle by
soaking overnight in water with a few drops of hair conditioner)
Hi Kush, other than soaking overnight and the hair conditioner, are there any tricks to the splitting/stripping process for the pheasant? My results so far have been, well, mixed. thx
 

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1st attempt

Got some help materials from speyman, and mixed in some of my own creation (taking Ed's advice to heart). I was able to get some pheasant to strip off for me. So is this getting close Kush?

I put the eyes opposite the upturn of the waddington because I was worried it wouldn't know which was up if I had them on the other side.
 

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