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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Disclaimer: The following details are from an angler who has never done any two-handed flycasting of any sort in his life... :wink:

I finally set aside a small block of time to go out and give the Atlantis a test drive on a huge field by city hall. I had the Orvis shooting head system rigged up (floating head) and began as advised by Juro with baby casts. These went rather smoothly. In fact, my biggest obstacle was getting used to gripping the rod both above and below the reel.

I then attempted to lengthen my casts with the smooth, gradual speed up and stop on the forward cast. This seemed to flow really nice, and without much effort I was banging out about 80 feet of line.

I then attempted the same, but with the addition of shooting a bit of line into the backcast. This resulted in a cast of about 100 feet. I repeated this until it was somewhat comfortable, and then remembered that my top (right) hand was positioned somewhat incorrectly. I was gripping the rod in the notch between the thumb and index finger, rather than ensuring that I could see at least part of the back of that hand facing to the back. With this adjustment and a few minutes of practice, my casts were out to about 120 feet.

My distance estimate of 120 feet was not done with a tape. Instead, I peeled off the remaining running line on the reel and subtracted that amount from appoximately 140 (100 foot running line plus 38 foot head). The combination of shooting a bit of line into the backcast, using a smooth and gradual acceleration leading to an abrupt stop on the final forward cast, and ensuring that my top hand was in proper alignment yielded the best results. I'm sure with more practice I'll be getting even more distance, but for only meddling with the system for about 20 minutes I must say that I'm quite pleased.

Three other notes:

1. There was a crosswind, but it didn't even register while I was casting. In fact, I didn't notice it until I was breaking down the rod to leave.

2. I have an Orvis Vortex reel matched up to the Atlantis, and it is a very well balanced outfit weightwise. Very comfortable.

3. I barely broke a sweat throwing that line. It's one thing to read about the reduced fatigue, but it's another thing entirely to feel it for yourself. Twenty minutes isn't a lot of work, but I didn't have even a whiff of exertion on my body.

Juro has done a fine job of putting the nuances of casting this rod into words here on the Forum. More practice to come in the very near future, but for now I'm smiling and can't wait to apply this cannon to the salt. :D
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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Wow! You are certainly a quick study, the description sounds spot-on.

To energize that cast to the next level, try keeping the overhang (shot line in the backcast) limited to about 5 ft max, but let the arms drift backward as far as you can reach on the extent of the backcast without dipping or changing the angle of the rod sustaining the angle of the line coming off the rod tip to the fly end.

Then apply the longest smooth / straight line path acceleration you can possibly create with a more aggressive speed-up that brick-walls into a very abrupt and rather high stop and watch that vee pointed loop fly another 20-30 feet further.

It's important to feel the full flexing IM8 blank bent just above the hands when you are coming forward and apply a power snap only when you've come to the end of the cast, which launches that deeply loaded energy violently upward through the blank and into the line at a rod angle that is much higher off horizon than you would expect, especially when compared to a single hand rod. However the line angle should be on a horizontal from the tip of the rod toward the target.

During the snap, keep the tip from deflecting downward which weakens the cast dramatically by opening the size of the loop and increasing air resistance like a parachute. Snap it as tight as possible, keeping the tip deflection pointing ahead and watch it fly. The super high modulus material in the Atlantis helps control that tip deflection even when catapaulting 650 grains. There is a 150ft long laser loop in there just waiting to be set free.

Congrats on your exceptional first fling, and welcome to the fraternity of surf-tamers :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Juro-

Thanks for the additional tips. In retrospect, my overhang was probably in the neighborhood of 10 to 15 feet, and I was consistently keeping my right elbow fairly tight to my body instead of letting my arms drift backwards. These are hard-wired single handed habits, and I'm glad that you brought them to my attention. I'll keep them in mind during my next casting session.

Also, the rod is so big that I believe I was trying a bit too hard to power the final forward cast. This resulted in some wide open loops, which I noticed and began to correct with the abrupt stop that you have described. But I need to do this consistently. It's kind of tempting at first to really smack that line forward, but I'll be letting the rod do more and more of the work moving forward.

By the way, if I'm a quick study then that has a great deal to do with you. Between watching your technique last September on South Monomoy and reading your tips and technincal points that are archived in the striper forum, I had a pretty clear starting point.

Thanks again, and hopefully I'll be flinging this bazooka over the weekend to some finned targets.
 

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Mark,
When I last took the rod out on the water it had been several weeks since I had cast it and as such was a little rusty. Also, I had been fishing a fast single-hand 6-wt. for a couple of weeks straight and was tuned in to casting with a very tight and fast stroke. It took me a little while to loosen up with the Atlantis and "let it go". I found that not powering the forward cast, but rather completing it in a sort of relaxed fashion (i.e. letting the rod do the work) threw just as much line (and often a little more) than trying too hard to power that portion of the cast. It was really an eye-opener, and I started remembering how Andrew at Tightlines would just throw lots of line in a very relaxed but deliberate manner with this rod. To me, the forward cast with this rod is unlike casting a single-hander at all because the tip stops further down at the end of the cast, i.e. the distance travelled by the tip overall is much longer. Perhaps some will think this an over-generalization, but it worked for me! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Chris. What you've described is very close to what I was experiencing once in a while (not letting the rod do the work). I'll take it under advisement.

I just hope I don't get buck fever Saturday night while chasing fish....I don't want my adrenaline levels to make me overpower the rod. I'll have to relax.

I must be one with the rod. :smokin:
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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with two hands people are tempted to "hit" the rod hard with both hands working against each other during the stroke rather than the correct application at the end of the stroke at the power snap. Snapping through the whole stroke causes the tip of the rod to deflect, which makes the energy go outward in a circular fashion instead of forward in a tight vee.

The rod is quite powerful so it will make the line obey even with a very smooth and easy motion. Keep the motion smooth and very straight from the extent of the backcast to the stopping point, try to extend the stroke distance as long as possible and accelerate smoothly keeping the moving line like a javelin before the very very abrupt stop. At the finish, the opposing force of push/pull with both hands launches the line great distances if the energy is properly directed and once again kept abrupt.

I can honestly say I have never fished so hard and so far in slop with so little effort in fact it's opened new possibilities in flyfishing and we are only getting started.
 

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"Also, I had been fishing a fast single-hand 6-wt. for a couple of weeks straight..."

I had the identical experience. I fished with the Atlantis for 8 days and finally began to get it down. Then for the next 4 weeks I did a lot of casting with a Sage RPL+ 6 wt. When I went back to the Cape for a weekend right after that, I had a hell of a time casting the Atlantis - worse than when I first got it - until I finally realized that I was still trying to cast the 6 wt but with two hands.
 
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