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chrome-magnon man
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NEWS RELEASE

Sea Lice Action Plan Will Not Protect Wild Salmon



For Immediate Release January 17, 2005


Victoria, BC – A provincial government plan to reduce sea lice on salmon farms by treating the fish with a toxic chemical will still expose young salmon to fatal levels of sea lice, says the Coastal Alliance for Aquaculture Reform (CAAR).

“This plan is essentially the same as the 2004 Sea Lice Action Plan, which resulted in a 95% incidence of sea lice on young wild salmon,” said Alexandra Morton, a Registered Professional Biologist who lives in the Broughton area off the north east coast of Vancouver Island and has studied the sea lice issue for four years.” “In 2001, we saw this many sea lice on juvenile wild salmon and it led to the biggest wild salmon collapse in recorded history.”


“Scientists from around the world support my research that shows salmon farms should not be located near the rearing grounds for young wild salmon,” said Morton. “In nature young salmon are isolated from older salmon, and the location of these farms shatters the natural laws that have produced some of the greatest salmon resources in the world.”

“Instead of looking for real and innovative ways to solve this problem, the provincial government wants to use a toxic chemical that poses risks to the marine environment and will fail to protect wild salmon, which is one of our most valuable public resources,” said Suzanne Connell, Program Coordinator for the Georgia Strait Alliance.


CAAR is calling on the government to require all BC salmon farms to transition to safe, closed contained tank systems with waste treatment. These systems eliminate escapes and greatly reduce the risk of disease and sea lice transfer between farmed and wild fish.

The Coastal Alliance for Aquaculture Reform (CAAR) is a coalition of conservation, science and First Nations groups working to protect the ocean and humans from the dangers of farmed salmon. For more information visit http://www.farmedanddangerous.org/

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For Interviews, please contact:

Alexandra Morton, Raincoast Research Society 250-949-1664

Suzanne Connell, Georgia Strait Alliance 250-381-8321
 

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Malcolm,

There are many who are concerned about the sea lice threat and the way our fish farm industry in general is regulated (or should I say not regulated). You on your side of the pond have experienced this already and are somewhat ahead of our learning curve. If you come across any other studies or reports that could be helpful we would appreciate hearing about them. Thanks.
 

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Thanks Malcolm,

It looks like we will have Craig Orr - a leader in the fight to control sea lice and farmed salmon speaking at out upcoming Steelhead Society AGM.

We need all the info we can get to deal with this issue.
 

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loco alto!
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How long do steelhead retain sea lice in freshwater? And how far can steelhead travel in a day, at the fastest? Yesterday, on a maiden voyage with a new spey rod, I landed a coastal Oregon fish with abundant lice that was 55 miles upriver (she took purple :tsk_tsk: )
 

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Steve
55 miles is pretty far. I've caught Atlantic salmon with sea lice nearly that far from saltwater on the upper Grande Cascapedia and have been told that the fish were fresh (within a day or two). Generally, I've heard it said that they will stay on fish for a day or two. But the literature says sea lice can survive in freshwater for up to 21 days!
Bill
 

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I am told that fish can make 3 mph walking pace. So for your 55 miles a little over 18hours or shall we call it a day allowing for rests.
Was it good fight? I remember catching a sealiced salmon 30 miles from the sea which just came in like a dog, obviously had just stopped for a rest and was exhausted.
Whilst waiting for the fish to recover I often flick the lice off I hope I'm doing the fish a favour.
 

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Willie Gunn said:
I remember catching a sealiced salmon 30 miles from the sea which just came in like a dog, obviously had just stopped for a rest and was exhausted.
Whilst waiting for the fish to recover I often flick the lice off I hope I'm doing the fish a favour.
I like the idea of removing the lice. Thanks for the idea.
Haven't noticed any difference in the fight and actually had to chase a bright 22 lb fish with sea lice from the upper Cascapedia for over a quarter mile a couple of years ago.
 

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Under laboratory conditions sea lice have been known to stay on fish for up to 7 days.

I have had fish on the river moriston in spring with long tails on them (tails being the egg sacks on the female lice).

They say that the eggs drop off within 2-3hours of being in fresh water. The river moriston is around 30miles from salt water?? :confused:

Gordon
 

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loco alto!
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Willie Gunn said:
Was it good fight?
I'd say "good" is a good description of the fight, not great, but not a dud. Its rare to see a lot of backing on this river, since it is only 40-60' wide, but she did work the boulders aggressively.
 
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