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Pullin' Thread
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4,694 Posts
It keeps your rod sections from twisting and coming loose. Remember, if the rod comes loose at a ferrule, it has a very high probability of breaking at the ferrule, and that would definitely ruin your day!
 

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a/k/a loophitech
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457 Posts
Thanks

Thanks flytyer, Dana...

I appreciate the new found information. Sometimes I need to come out of my cave to learn new things! :)
 

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Banned
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184 Posts
Is taping of the guides really needed? Many good speycasters I know don't use tape and don't have any problems. Everyone uses short rods and short bellies. Does that make any difference. ( just seems that it is usually long rod/long belly casters that discuss taping).
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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1,771 Posts
Taping of ferrules is absolutely necessary. CND is considering making it part of the warranty. :lildevl:

Just kidding!!! But you know... it would make a huge difference in breakage if everybody did.

Two reasons:

- the longer rods experience serious torsion and ferrules will come loose regardless of brand, design, materials, etc.

- the ferrules are too far away to check frequently enough for tightness

Simply put, the only way to prevent ferrule damage from casting while loose is tape. It only takes one cast with a loose ferrule to potentially create damage and render the rod useless for the rest of a long anticipated trip to the back-country. BTW - breaking a rod due to casting with a loose ferrule is not a manufacturing or design defect.
 

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Steelhead Dreamer
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462 Posts
As an alternative proposition I would note that I was taught to only use what is part two of the taping system shown above. That I should only use the premium 3M brand vinyl electrical tape and stretch it as I put it on. The person who taught me this method has logged more hours with a spey rod than 99% of the spey casters today.

I would also like to suggest that there are two schools of thought on taping. One school says it is not necessary and there are may casters who have tens of thousands of hours casting spey rods without mishap to suggest that this school of thought works for some at least. The second school says you should tape as it helps prevent undesireable breakage at the ferrules. They also have many spey casters with tens of thousands of hours on the water to show that their method also works. Guess it really depends on the quality of the ferrules and how well they are fit by the factory, how careful the rod owner is in assemblying his rod, and the whims of the Red Gods. So is taping required? No. Is it a good procedure to use? Yes.

I would also note that it is not the length of the rod but the motions used in making spey casts which creates the torque that twists ferrules loose. And that the length of a rod has nothing to do with checking ferrules - that is done, or not done, due to the laziness of the rod user. :cool: For example when was the last time you saw anyone actually check the ferrules of even a 6 ft. 2 pc. rod.

Regards,
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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1,771 Posts
Halcyon,

You make some good points, especially about the way the rod is assembled. This is important and not consistent from angler to angler. I have watched a fairly significant number of people assembling ferrules (trade shows, conclaves, instructing, guiding, etc) and am frequently compelled to correct their assemblage.

As far as checking ferrules that are not close verses near to hand, I guess that depends on the individual. I frequently check ferrules on single hand rods because I can reach them. I've owned top of the line rods from the worlds biggest manufacturers and have had ferrule fit issues and loosening problems. I buy two of each for my guiding business and the two were very different rods in this respect so the evidence in my experiences suggests that said quality is at the individual rod level, not brand or method. Therefore it would be more likely a matter of chance than repeatable process. Hence the way I see it, taping is the great equalizer.

But aside from all that, the person you cite as having been speycasting for more than 99% of the folks here - regardless of whether the longitudinals were excluded or included...

he does tape! :smokin:
 

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506 Posts
why I tape

I tape for self preservation. I dont want to go home before I am ready. If I drive 80 miles to my favorite run, am fortunate to get there before anyone else, I dont want my rod comming apart, breaking, and sending me home early. Maybe it would never happen,,,,,,, but,,,,, I dont want to take the chance.

Skilly
 

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Steelhead are cool!
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572 Posts
Skilly that is why you bring more than one rod. :hihi:
I use to tape but now I just wax and check ferrule tightness
periodically during the day. I fish a run then move so taping
is a pain. If I had a rod and I noticed the ferrules or a certain
ferrule loosens up consistently I would tape.

Alright let me have it.

Kevin
 

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chrome-magnon man
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5,375 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
some tape, some don't

I think it's a good idea and I advocate it...and I fish short rods, long rods, shooting heads, short bellies, long bellies, traditional, underhand, etc etc and so on. The method in the clips was shown to me by my pal Per Stadigh who lives in Sweden and is an underhand caster and likes short rods and shooting heads.

Some tape, some don't, but I always get asked about how I tape a spey rod at my clinics and I always demonstrate the method I use, so I thought it would be good to include it in Spey Basics too. I used to use the method halcyon describes (part 2) but I found that the sections would still move around. Per's method really minimizes this problem.

PKK, for clarification, I tape the ferrules, not the guides.
 

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562 Posts
Juro mentioned correcting the way that people put a rod together. I guess I didn't realize that there was a right way or wrong way to assemble the rod. Can anyone calrify ?

Gillie
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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1,771 Posts
Gillie -

I shouldn't have been such a butthead with that statement. What I meant is that I see that many if not most people just push straight down on the ferrules and assume the grip is tight when it stops moving downward. Maybe it's because so many folks are just getting into ff lately and I am mostly referring to trade shows where many are trying to learn about the sport.

In any case, the way I was taught to secure ferrules is to push the section down onto the ferrule a little off center, then twist downward and around with additional pressure until the guides are aligned to finish the 'seating' of the sections.

Still, cold mornings transitioning to hot summer days are common in the mountains and there are all kinds of stresses and loads on the joint over the course of the day.

The only thing close to being reliable when it comes to two-handed rods is a good tape job, IMHO FWIW .02
 

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loco alto!
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3,109 Posts
I've also "heard" that twist and set is better for ferrules - but why? Is this a hangover from the days of metal ferrules? I can reef down much harder by lining up the guides first, then forcing together tightly .
 

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Loco,

I think the twist and set mentality goes back to waxing. The twist melts/softens the wax and the set secures firmly.
 

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Witnessed a rod break at the lowest ferrule, the fellow had no tape, I don't know if tape had anything to do with it, but my rod is always taped now.
 

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So I have to ask...

Are you the real JP Patches?
 
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