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I am working to improve my casting with long belly lines and have a tendency to cast a taling loop by applying too much power into a too short stroke. One of the spey casters at the Golden Gate club recommended putting my right foot forward (with right arm up) and rocking gently backwards and forwards. This has helped.

However I am still wrestling with this. Any tips on how to get a longer stroke length would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Speystudent
 

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JD
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which foot forward

Same foot (as top hand) forward is the way the Scot's do it. Mike Maxwell also had a similar style that involved a rocking motion.

The other way of doing it puts the opposite foot forward. This enables, lets call it a weight transfer from forward to rear and back again, but more importantly, a longer stroke. By combining all body movments, from the transfer of weight at the feet, (rotating of hips (single Spey)) extending stroke length through the shoulders and arms, a much longer smoother stroke is acheivable.

Not to say one way is any better than the other. You certainly cannnot argue with success. Just different styles. Play with each and use what suits you best.
 

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Just don't start bending at the waist. You will throw the line onto the water behind you and in front of you. If you watch the Scots on the "Art of Spey Casting" video you see that they glide back and forth. No bending at the waist.

(Can we abbreviate the "Art of Spey Casting" video to AoSC video? It's a paint to type it out all the time.)
 

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JD
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bending at the waist

baldmountain said:
Just don't start bending at the waist. You will throw the line onto the water behind you and in front of you. If you watch the Scots on the "Art of Spey Casting" video you see that they glide back and forth. No bending at the waist.
In one of my books (River Journal-Rogue River) is a shot of a guy making a Spey cast. Bent forward on the final delivery. The line, while still unrolling, has such a sag in the belly that it will crash on the water long before the fly ever reaches it's destination.

This is a definate no-no. I have heard this refered to as "cow towing" as well as other things. Derek Brown makes reference to this pracice in his video and advises "stand proud laddie"

The tailing loop, by the way, is the result of excessive power being applied too early in the stroke. Often due to frustration,,,a "get out there you S.O.B" mind set. Slow down. Start the stroke slowly, accellerate thru the stroke, ending with an abrupt stop.
 

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JDJones said:
The tailing loop, by the way, is the result of excessive power being applied too early in the stroke. Often due to frustration,,,a "get out there you S.O.B" mind set. Slow down. Start the stroke slowly, accellerate thru the stroke, ending with an abrupt stop.
Extending this discussion if you are having trouble casting long belly lines you probably want to work on your form rather than trying to lengthen the forward stroke. Again, watching th AoSC video, most of those guys are throwing 100+ feet of line without exerting themselves. They have great form rather than relying on lots of force.

IIRC the only person on the video who looks like he is jumping out of his shoes during a cast is Tim Rajeff and he is throwing a tournamnet level amount of line with a single handed rod.
 

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What rod and line are you throwing? And how much head length are you trying to pick up (at the hands)? Single spey? Double? All casts?

William
 

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One problem with folks who start to carry more line is that the "back cast" where you form th D loop is a too short stroke with the hand stopping too far forward - so no place to go with a smooth acceleration to a stop on the forward stroke. If you can get a copy of Derek's video, at the very beginning he indicates where to stop on the back cast and he extends back as far as he can go - keep the elbow bent with the hand at about ear level but pull your shoulder back as far as it will go. As other have said by rocking on your feet or swiveling at the hips (keeping the upper body straight) you can extend this motion even more.
 

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JD
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extended backcast

Very well put Rick. And as we all know, it is next to impossible to get a good forward cast if the backcast is crappy.
 
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