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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,

This past year I switched over to stockingfoot breathable waders. I absolutely love the waders however the last few late fall/early winter steelhead trips I did my feet got uncomfortably cold very quickly. :whoa:

Any advice on keep them warmer? I can't wear too heavy a sock as my stockingfoots aren't big enough.

Any recommendations on super warm mid-weight to heavy-weight socks? Or has anyone tried the battery operated socks offered by BassPro (RedHead) or Cabela's?

Or, do you have to go to fixed boot waders?

Thanks in advance,
Preston

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Try a polypropylene, thermax, or coolmax liner sock under a pair of quality mid-to heavy weight poly/wool blend or coolmax/wool blend boot socks. You will be suprised at how much difference the liner socks make. You might also try the liner sock with a pair of 200 wt fleece socks.
 

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I'm a tall guy with poor foot circulation. For me, there is no substitute for insulated bootfoot neoprenes. Mine were bought too large, so I could wear thick socks plus a neoprene oversock inside the boots. I had studded felts installed by a local cobbler so there would be no wading compromises. If my feet are in pain, then I'm not having fun. My bootfoot breathables are not nearly as warm as my bootfoot neoprenes (3 mm is plenty).

Some tricks I learned while fishing subzero in upstate NY: like flytyer suggests, layer with polypro undersocks. Also wait until you arrive at the river before putting on your fishing socks, so that they are free of any perspiration (this really helps). On the drive to the river, keep the socks near a heater vent in the car.

good luck, and toasty toes
 

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WRX,
I love Patagonia socks and the liner socks they sell. The combination is very warm even in frigid water. The old expedition weight socks were a little heavier than this years model, if you can find some left over at a shop I would grab them. This years is good also, just a little lighter.

Gillie
 

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One of the biggest reasons for cold feet is tightening you boots too much - you should keep them quite loose in cold water as this allows much better circulation and don't bunch up with alot of socks - the light weight sock followed by a warm wool sock or fleese sock is a great idea
 

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Something that I have heard works great but have yet to try is gortex socks. I have been meaning to pick up a pair but so far have settled for poly-pro liners and wool socks.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks!

Thanks for all the ideas guys.

I actually just bought Simms G3 stockingfoots so there's no well in H#LL I'll be buying any more waders anytime soon. :)

My stockingfoots are pretty snug so the idea of loosening up is a good one. That definitely was a problem for me with downhill ski boots.

I own a pair of gore-tex socks. Not sure how they would help as they're designed to keep your feet dry, no real insulation value.

Has anyone tried the battery operated socks? Or the socks with pouches for Hotshots?

Thanks again,
Preston

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I got a pair of Gortex socks under the Christmas tree and after a couple of days on the water I have been meaning to post about them - so this thread is perfect.

Dana has been wearing these for a couple of years and has been raving about them. Now I understand why. Yes, they are to keep your feet dry and this does keep them warm! The only non-breatheable part of gortex waders are the neoprene feet, therefore any sweat that occurs there cannot escape which creates moisture which will contribute substantially to cold feet. I wore high-tech hiking socks (quite thin) and the gortex and I was very impressed. I noticed an immediate improvement in the warmth and comfort of my feet the first day I wore the gortex socks - I definitely recommend them.

Of course, the other suggestions like keeping the boots loose and breatheable liner socks are very important - but I think the gortex socks should be on the list as well.
 

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Battery Heated Socks

Battery heated socks work a bit. They heat a narrow strip on the bottom of each sock where the toes join the foot. The socks are connected to wires that attach to a two D-size battery pack worn above the wader belt, in a pocket or wherever. The user is supposed to connect and disconnect the batteries based on foot temperature, and to save batteries.

If you leave the batteries connected, two new alkaline batteries last about a half day of fishing.

I don't recommend them.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
kush said:
I got a pair of Gortex socks under the Christmas tree and after a couple of days on the water I have been meaning to post about them - so this thread is perfect.

Dana has been wearing these for a couple of years and has been raving about them. Now I understand why. Yes, they are to keep your feet dry and this does keep them warm! The only non-breatheable part of gortex waders are the neoprene feet, therefore any sweat that occurs there cannot escape which creates moisture which will contribute substantially to cold feet. I wore high-tech hiking socks (quite thin) and the gortex and I was very impressed. I noticed an immediate improvement in the warmth and comfort of my feet the first day I wore the gortex socks - I definitely recommend them.

Of course, the other suggestions like keeping the boots loose and breatheable liner socks are very important - but I think the gortex socks should be on the list as well.
I see. So just to make sure I understand correctly you're wearing the gore-tex socks over your other socks? Therefore the gore-tex socks are effectively letting your feet breathe yet keep the moisture from coming back in contact with your feet.

I guess either way, whether the gore-tex is right next to your skin or not, the concept still applies. Mind-you cotton (gosh forbid) would lose it's insulation qualities if damped by sweat (wool and synthetics not).

Thanks again for the info. I wish I wouldn't have lost ONE of my gore-tex socks! $50 for a pair is costly and I seldom used them. :(
 

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Yes, I am wearing a thin pair of Hi-tech socks, then the gortex over them.
 

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Last year I bought a pair of Gore Tex Wading socks to wear in my flats wading boots and semi sandal/boots.

They work well there, and they excel in cold water.

A lot of the wading socks are made with Merino Wool. If the Merino wool gets damp in a neophrene booty from foot perspiration or a small leak, it will stay wet and get wetter. That makes your feet get colder as more perspiration builds up.

The Goretex socks help to prevent this build up. They transmit the moisture from your feet and the wool to the outside of the sock. Then the moisture is trapped between the sock booty and the wader booty. That should act as an insulation barrier.

Buy the Gore Tex socks with the highest ankle/calf length.
 

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winter Steelheading-cold feet

I gotta chime in here as I've had my share of winter outings over these years. Back before I was limited to bootfoots, my stockingfoot waders caused me many miserable cold feet outings. Went back to bootfoot waders with a little bit of looseness in them (NOT TIGHT)coupled with some Merino Wool socks and have not had any cold feet since. I have spent many days on the Rivers with air temps in single digits and in the teens. I cannot speak to any of these new socks as I have not had any. The main thing, I believe, is the feet cannot be cramped up so the blood can circulate properly. My biggest problem is how to keep the guides from icing? Best, Stiver
 
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