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Brockton
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all,
Just curious - I'm getting in to building both single and 2H rods.

Usual rule of thumb for single handers seems to be that number of guides on the rod should be equal to the length of the rod + 1 (or two at the most). However it seems a lot of 2H rods have fewer - my 11ft TFO DC has 10, for instance. And Steve Godshall's guide spacing rec's for the ARE rods have 10 guides for the 11 and 12 ft models.

Just wondering if anyone knows the reasons behind this, and your thoughts on why 2h rods would have different needs. What are your preferences?

Thanks!
 

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Guide count is a compromise! Less guides increase more rod bend when casting and fighting fish because line angle between guides increase. More guides cause more rod bend when casting because they increase rod weight. Also cost, line friction when shooting line and air drag increase.

Esa
 

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I've only built 4 two handers, but I have put the length minus one for my guides on all my rods. I taped on and tried more on each rod, but liked less guides.
 

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Brockton
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481 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've only built 4 two handers, but I have put the length minus one for my guides on all my rods. I taped on and tried more on each rod, but liked less guides.
I guess that's my basic question: why do my factory SH rods have length + 1 while 2H have length - 1? I know it's all personal preference, but just curious...
 

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Talk to a rod builder/designer like Bob Meiser some time and ask him. He and Steve Godshall have both been helpful answering questions about blanks, guide choice and placement, and handle design. Although I have been casting two handers a long time I am new to building them and their thoughts have been invaluable.
 

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Pullin' Thread
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This is a no brainer.

Two-hand rods have fewer guides than the length of the rod for the simple reason that the rear grip, reel seat, and front spey grip take up a good bit more of the butt section of the blank than the reel seat and grip on a single-hander, including one with a 1.5" built-on fighting butt.

How many guides do you think your 8' rod would have if it had a 4" rear spey grip, 4" reel seat, and 12" front spey grip? Or you 9' rod if it had a 4.5' rear spey grip, 4.5" reel seat, and 13" front spey grip? Or your 10' rod if it had a 5" rear spey grip, 4.5" reel seat, and 14" front spey grip?
 

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Brockton
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481 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
This is a no brainer.

Two-hand rods have fewer guides than the length of the rod for the simple reason that the rear grip, reel seat, and front spey grip take up a good bit more of the butt section of the blank than the reel seat and grip on a single-hander, including one with a 1.5" built-on fighting butt.

How many guides do you think your 8' rod would have if it had a 4" rear spey grip, 4" reel seat, and 12" front spey grip? Or you 9' rod if it had a 4.5' rear spey grip, 4.5" reel seat, and 13" front spey grip? Or your 10' rod if it had a 5" rear spey grip, 4.5" reel seat, and 14" front spey grip?
Ha! I admit that I never thought of that.
I did send Steve an email, as well. His response was that a 10 guide layout will avoid placing a guide on the ferrules of any rod under 12 ft. Above 12 ft you start to need more.
 

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FWIW, I just built a 12 and a half footer that has 11 guides - two stripping guides and 9 runners. This is one more than my factory produced Echo rod of the same length.
 

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You will NEVER be wrong if you static or load test it. Place them where you think they should go, place the rod under a load (I normally use a 1/3 flex a general rule) and review your guide set up and shuffle or add/remove as needed. The least amount of guides you can use is always best. keep the line following the general flex of the rod without too many large gaps and flat line spots between the guides. Too many guides reduces the fast response and crispness of the rod to little will cause stress points in the rod.

Different rods may require the same amount of guides spaced differently, a faster rod will require slightly more guides in the top section to allow the line to follow the blank better with its more drastic flex but less more increased space on down the blank as rod will typically flex less.

A slower action rod will be more evenly spaced thorough out the rod.
 
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