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how many different spey styles do you use regularly on rivers?

  • I use only 1 style

    Votes: 58 15.3%
  • 2

    Votes: 140 36.8%
  • 3

    Votes: 105 27.6%
  • 4

    Votes: 48 12.6%
  • 5

    Votes: 29 7.6%
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loco alto!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
where are all the polls to pass the time?

just a quickie - how many different spey styles do you use on a regular basis when river fishing.

the choices are:

traditional long line
scando
skagit
generic (windcutter-midspey strokes, longer than scando, shorter than long line)
overhead

if you want to take issue with my categories, then do so. The point of this thread is to generate some thought and discussion
 

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inglorious 2hander
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1,048 Posts
I would have to add another style-MINE-:whoa: Its not very pretty but it works for me. Fished with long bellies for yrs. Choice of rods changed, size of flies changed (bigger for the most part), and the tips got longer and heavier. Any more I fish a homemade (chopped) skagit and a mid belly line for the most part. I've been thinking about a long belly line that has been laying around collecting dust.. Thinking about selling it that is:hihi:
 

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344 Posts
I only use one style. The "Williamette River" style:Eyecrazy: , which is an off shoot of the Santiam Style but with a longer stroke. The Santiam Style was probably really developed on the Willamette River but upriver from where the "Willamette River" style is from. It is critical to note the difference between a style developed on the Willamette and the "Willimmette Style" which are different! :D :D
 

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1,297 Posts
interesting!

i myself have noticed `upper rogue styles' and `middle rogue styles',,several varients noted,,now the lower rogue style and the agness overhead are not closeley related in technic ,only the area where they are used,,more studies simply must be done to verify and clarify the various casts being performed riverwide,i use a single,switch,touch and go or overhead depending on how much ale in the bucket or,,, if i just miss anchoring down with a sinktip i convert it into a touch and go overhead(sort of)doesn't matter witch line:chuckle: i'll see if i can find some casting video footage to swap for some willammettee footage eh?:hihi:
(we're only joking here,,aren't we?,,`willamettee'?);)
 

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I generally have both long belly and skagit lines on most trips I go on - I enjoy the long line stuff mainly with floating lines and smaller flies but have spent more and more time playing with the skagit style - it sure makes it easy to cast anything you want from floating to heavy tips and bugs - I have had a shoulder problem for awhile now and the skagit style allows an easy cast with very little effort.
 

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3 types

1. Basic 3 Skagit casts.
2. Standard/Classic spey casts with those 3 Skagit casts with normal timing and no real pauses and waiting. Then I will use snake rolls and roll casts where appropriate.
3. Overhead casts at the ocean shore and on rivers where I have to reach out and have room for the backcast.

I get the feeling those of us, who use the Rio Outbounds with the shorter and lighter rods are developing a lot of hybrid casts based on the 3 basic Skagit casts and the 3 corresponding stand Spey casts. Dana mentioned his hybrid style. I find myself doing whatever is necessary to get the fly where I want it regardless of casting areas with minimal problems to severe limits due to brush, trees and other hazards. Fly size, leader length and sink rate of sinking tips/leaders, if used, get thrown into the mental calculations. Adjustments are made, and the casts usually get where I want them with minimal effort.

Yesterday evening on our local river was an example of this blending. I started out with my Sage 6126, Rio Outbound 11 Floater, a ten' leader and a couple of feet of 12# FC tippet to cast a size 4/0 weighted Clouser. Nothing was happening with that and there was a lot of top water activity, which may have been carp. I went to a size 20 intermediate with a Dandelion white floater with a 6# 4' tippet. I basically casted to activity with a simple roll cast or one of the Skagit casts or classic casts from 30' to 80'.

Next, I tried Bill Malin's ARC 7 weight 12'6" rod with a 550 Skagit and a 4/0 Clouser. With a few adjustments and I was casting the fly and shooting 2-4 rod lengths of running line with Edgit's Cast or the Double Spey Skagit.

Next, I went my friend, Gary, and changed my 6126 with him and used his Gary Anderson special Sage 12' 6", 5 piece rod, with the Aeroflo Skagit and a big Clouser. There was activity out at about 70-80'. The Double Spey Skagit with this rod and line, to my amazement put that fly out like a laser to the lanes. Unfortunately the fish didn't want any offerings. I had some tugs earlier but nothing later.

In a little over an hour, I used 3 totally different Spey Rods with 3 totally different lines. With a hybrid blend of casts, I was able to get the fly out inspite of no room for backcast/Dloops, no wading, tidal flow and some fairly heavy wind.

My casts weren't objects of beauty, and they would probably drive those who have made a religion of classic Spey casting to insanity. I could care less, as these hybrid casts worked for me with some very adverse casting conditions.
 

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Banned
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974 Posts
I am a Delta/WC adding Skagit 13'ish sort of guy. Most of my rivers are small to medium sized and quickly frozen over. Long bellies, long rods and the long leaders needed for Scandi don't really work on 75' wide river.

- David
 

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1- Spey-Old school XLT,s chopped back for tips/ and out of the box uncut for sub 3,500 CFS flows generally and up in the column presentations
2- Spey-Scando sinking heads for big flows and heavily weighted patterns, nailed to the bottom presentations.
3- Overhead with cut back for tips Mach 1's for the lake surf

Long bellies I do my best Derek Browm imitation/Scando I do my best self- taught Dana articles Underhand approach and Overhead I belt it out with a short stroke- fast load approach.

Then again I,m not fishing for salmonids:)))

Will
 

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Sigh .... two posts by fellow Oar-E-Gon-E-on's and both prove their nut cases. I, though, will try to "raise the bar." :hihi: Actually, darned good question which I'd never really considered.

When I hit the 'two button' above, was rather surprised to see I dropped into a '50% group.' In my case, my lines are either very long headed or short and two the point (shooting head type). One style for one, another for the other.
 

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Norwegian speyfanatic
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90% of my fishing is with scandinavian shooting heads from 12-15 meters long with underhand casting style. The last 10% is divided between medium and long belly spey lines with a crossover between traditional and underhand casting style.
 

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Long bellies rule!

I've been firmly in the longer rod/longer belly line camp since the beginning, and will probably continue to be. I'm so new to Skagit line casting that it remains to be seen how much that will influence my fishing with heavy tips and flies.

I was going to interject that midbelly lines constitute a separate and previously unmentioned category. But, on further reflection, I'd say that mid-belly lines are simply the longer-belly lines best suited for shorter rods, for those of us who want to pick up and recast with whatever length rod we're using. :Eyecrazy: I guess that my casting with shorter rods and mid-length bellies is what SSSpey classifies as Generic.
 

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laughing about this thread last eve

while fishing,,funny how `thespeypages' accompanies one during the journey;) ,,,i guess my `style' has boiled down to this;the`i'll take it',`thats good enough',and,`how'd you pull that off?'styles,,basic,simple,easy to merember even after a long layoff and fun;)
 

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90%

Of my fishing is for Atlantic salmon in eastern canada so depending on the size of river,I would have to say that my two casting styles consist of a traditional long line and "generic" (short,mid-spey) floaters.:smokin:
 

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Only a couple of groups in my repertoire

Sustained anchor and touch-and-go, depending on the line and tips. My stroke is pretty underhand. Once I went underhand, I stayed there even with the longer bellied lines. It's just so much more shoulder friendly.

Carl
 

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Summer and winter. Long and short. Floating and sunk. Low rivers and swollen rivers. On the gravel bar and under the trees.
:chuckle:
 

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For me

it is three. Most of my fishing is with mid to long belly lines. In tight quarters I will go to a shorter rod and Skagit style line. I also use the shorter rod and Skagit in situations with heavy tips, especially when floating with a pontoon boat.
 
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