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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How important is hook size in relation to tube size when fishing?
Does the eye of the hook need to tuck inside the tubing?
Is junction tubing necessary?
What is the goal of the hook size with tube flies (i.e. the smaller the better)?

I have done searches on the site and not answered these questions to my satisfaction, so hopefully this is new information for others as well.

Thanks!
 

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hmmm, some good questions. I'll take a stab at answering.

As far as size goes, I usually just fish a size 2 (maybe a 4 on smaller patterns), as I feel this gives me plenty of holding power, with minimal damage done to the fish. Of course, you can play with hook size a bit to affect how the fly swims, and to some extent, sink rate. I expect some use different sizes to "balance" a fly, but I personally don't feel the need.As for the goal of hook size? For me, it is the ability to fish a big fly with a small hook, thereby giving the fish a better shot at survival. I wouldn't necessarily say smaller is better though (there's a limit).

If you use junction tubing, then yes, the eye of the hook should be all up inside it. Otherwise it is extraneous. I find I don't really need it on patterns that are tied in the round, such as simple marabou ties. However, I have noticed that the line can wear through with some tube types if I don't use it, so that is something to consider. Also, I've never experienced it, but some worry about the tube sliding up the line, away from the hook, resulting in missed takes. It can be helpful if you want to, for example, have the hook point ride up when dredging, in order to avoid snags. I find the best thing to do is leave a space at the back of all my tubes, and I can add or remove the tubing at my leisure.

Hope this is helpful.
 

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Hi Argos

You can fish the tubefly both ways, the hook hanging loose behind the fly or you can put the hook into the tube.

If yoiu fish the hook hanging loose after the fly, then its very good to put a silicone tube over knot to protect it.
If I fish small tubes I like to have hook hanging after, so the fly gets so much life as possible.
 

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No expert here, but have noticed:

I have found that some plastic tubes are soft enough to be able to push the hook into the end; just like a junction tube. Most plastic tubes are too rigid for this. The plastic tubes which are thin and soft work well like that. It simplifies the fly tying and number of parts to have around the bench. A good example are the plastic tubes sold by Rooney-FYI.

Keel rigging the hook to the fly works very well with silcone junction tubes. I don't like the vinyl tubing or Tygon tubing because it isn't as flexible when cold.
 

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following flymakers comments..the more rigid plastic tubes that do accept a hook can shatter or split if the hook bangs around on a rock on the bottom or goes through a fish take and fight...I prefer this insertion method to the otion of the flexible vinyl link connection on plastic tubes but be prepared to have some tubes break on you..as to hook size I am fish wet plastic tubes for summer runs mostly and they work well with the 4 size and on dry waking tubes 6 or smaller with tubes and hooks being acquired primarily from red shed. Of course if you tie individual tubes with braided (twister) mono orfireline type extensions out the back, that is a different discussion, but really smaller hook s will work in that deal..
 
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