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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Apologies if this has been beat to death in dim history, but blanking on finding info on the subject.

Ton of hook shapes, sizes, etc. That said, is there any consensuses on hook shape(s) that appear to have a better (or worse?) actual hooking ability? Obviously a thinner wire will hook faster than a 'fat wire,' that's a function of cross section and 'puncture power.'
 

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Hi Fred,

Missing you over at 'the other place'.

I like a short shank, a wide gape and a micro barb (where allowed). Doubles down to a size 6, tubes for anything bigger with a Loop Tube double or Partridge Big Mouth Double. With a tube I like my hook turned up so the points fish on the top of the fly just under the wing. Seem to get less snags and I like to feel I'm pulling the hook up into the upper jaw rather than pulling it out of the lower jaw which can happen if the hook swims points down. (Note to self, must tie some doubles upside down in smaller sizes. Wonder how they would swim:Eyecrazy: ????)

Falkus's book on sea trout fishing had some really good stuff on hooks if I remember. Ill dig it out and post anything of interest.

Sam
 

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For barbless applications, I prefer a hook with as long a point or spear as possible, and a fairly round bend. Once you've sharpened a hook with a short point once or twice, there's not much left to hold a fish. I don't think the perfect hook for going barbless has been made yet, because almost all hooks are designed to be barbed, without much thought as to how it might work with the barb pinched down... Most of my wet flies are tied on T7999's.

Poul
 

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The last couple of years I,ve been using octopus hooks in sizes 1,2,4,6 for salmon species.The short shank and wide gap has increased my hooking ratio and landing fish.With bigger Chum and Springs in some cases the fly hook would straighten out resulting in losing the fish but with the octopus hook this hasn't happened at all.I use different color glo-bug yarn and wieght the fly with different densities of hour-glass eyes.Easy and fast to tie but so effective.
 

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hey Fred

I'm assuming you're talking steelhead. Lately, I like the Waddington shanks with the Daiichi 510 X-Point in size 4 for the longer flies (3" +). I like the old tried and true turned down eye for flies that are size 4 4x long and smaller (< 3"). I think the Alec Jackson hooks are the coolest looking for swept wing flies. They seem to penetrate and hold OK in size 1 and smaller.

I'm not 100% certain but I think that I have lost fewer flies on the bottom with the 510/waddington combo than other big irons. Just something else to consider.

Gary
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Given a 'choice' I probably use a short shank, ring eye #4 (scud and 'normal shape') more than all other hooks combined. Whether as an egg pattern, prawn, behind a tube or waddie this has been the most consistent hook shape for me.

Only exception to that is when I get down into #10's, and less, then a light wire hook (pure penitration power) has my 'nod.'
Fred
 
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