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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All

New member and newish spey caster here. Hoping you can help me with a basic problem. Despite not having any lessons (yeah I know I should) I have surprised myself by finding I can get a reasonable length of line out with my new 15' rod. But what I keep doing is catching the bankside vegetation with my leader and fly as it kicks up behind me on the forward cast. OK I can stand a bit further out into the river (Tweed usually), but with high water levels above my waist just 4' out from the bank I am not inclined to go much deeper. And on occasion it would be nice to be able to spey cast from the bankside itself rather than having to get into the raging torrent. The catching the weeds problem happens most with double spey casts when I seem to cast much squarer across the river.

Any tips and pointers welcome. Thanks.

fidra
 

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Well done on teaching yourself, its not easy.

Although its a brilliant casting technique, the Spey Cast is not the perfect cast for all situations.

There is a "zone" where you can't get away from the bank, because of the river height or terrain where both styles of Spey Cast can fall down. You feel cramped for space having not enough room to execute the loop to give you the direction of cast you would like, this is especially the case for the Double Spey.

If there's enough room I'll change from the double spey to a left handed single spey.

If there's still not enough room then its an Underhand Cast, which is a poor subtitute and compromises a little on distance. The Snake Roll is another option you could explore but it also needs a little room to change direction.

I not sure if the Snap T would help, its not a cast I am very familiar with but I think it would struggle for room as well. Perhaps someone else could enlighten you here.

These are slightly strong and sweeping critisms of the Spey Cast which it doesn't really deserve, its a great technique and 95% of the time I find that a Spey Cast does the job perfectly.

A tip for deep water when up to your armpits: make sure the reel is next to your cheek on the forward cast.(or higher if you can manage it)

Hope this helps.
 

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After you lift to the 11 o clock position sweep the rod more sideways rather than straight back this will position the second anchor further out from the bank.

Then cast as normal.

I find that this works best with a single spey.
 

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Single

fidra, I agree with Malcolm on the single being best for this tight work. Derek Brown has a segment in his spey video (I think he calls it a cut cast). It is a single that starts a little into the bank then places the anchor farther out in the stream before the forward stroke. That allows the line to stay farther away from the bank and works well in a fairly strong downstream wind, as well.

The snapping the fly into the bank sounds like too much force too soon and popping the anchor that results. Try easing into the forward stroke and see if that doesn't help.
 

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All Spey type casts require a D-loop as the essence of any roll cast. If I'm in a tight situation, and often I am fishing association water with poor bankside maintenance, I have found that the Snap C/Circle Spey works. However, you still need the D-Loop, but this cast naturally grips the water a little more as a lot of line usually ends up lying on the water across the front of you. What to do is strip in slightly more than normal. Make the circle or C to push the line up stream. The line should now be lying on the water. Pick up your D Loop, but leave a bit more than normal as an anchor, and make your forward cast. This grip on the water allows a slightly shallower D-Loop.

An easier and more efficient method is to try swinging your anchor slightly further out into the river(away from the bank) on the back cast. Using more bottom hand and starting with the tip closer to your own bank on the back cast will aid this.

If only there was a simple way of double hauling with a two handed rod!!!

Tight Lines,

Gary.
 

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Gary

In essence you are already there. The second hand does the job of hauling by applying more force to the rod and does it more easily than hauling for most of us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks all for your help - I guess I knew there would be no easy answer. Get that anchor a bit further out and don't overpower the cast seems to be the answer. Some more fishing practice required.....better get started.

fidra
 

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Watch the anchor

fidra - watching the anchor can help. If it pulls back to the shore a little that is OK, but it needs to stay in the water to help keep the rod loaded until the forward cast. If it is popping out and back toward the bank it is the too much too soon.
 
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