Spey Pages banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let's call me an average caster (10-15 years (whenever the first Sage 9140 came out) but only 1 or 2 weeks/year). I just had Bob Meiser build me a 13' 6/7MKS, which, of course, is much stiffer than my old 9140 but I understand is now considered a moderate action rod. Beautiful rod by the way. Anyway, I'm throwing a Snowbee 2D and am just throwing the head (62') and about 5' of running line with a single spey and everything is working nicely and as I get into the slower part of the run I start getting a tailing loop. A overhead cast tailing loop is caused by the backcast and forward cast being less that 180 degrees apart. This was different in that the D loop seemed to unroll in front of me and the upstream portion of the line (actually the leader) came downstream and ran into the line that was unrolling in front of me.

Let me try to explain it differently. As I complete my forward cast the line unrolls off the rod tip traveling toward the target. In the D Loop the line travels downstream toward the caster and as it gets close to the caster it changes direction 90 degrees and follows the line that is unrolling perpendicular to the current and traveling toward the target. It also travels vertically from the surface of the water (anchor) to the top of the loop that is traveling perpendicular to the current toward the target. Usually this downstream and vertical change of direction occurs upstream of the flyline that is unrolling toward the target. In this case the tip of the flyline or leader would continue downstream and collide with the line unrolling toward the target. The change of direction didn't happen upstream of the unrolling line.

What am I doing wrong?

When I would get to the tailout and the current would pick up the tailing loops would stop and everything would work right. Sorry to be so wordy.

Thanks,

Mark
 

·
loco alto!
Joined
·
3,120 Posts
from what I can surmise, your forward cast is colliding with itself. Is that right?

If so, perhaps your D-loop is not 180 degrees opposite the forward cast. A bloody L makes it worse.

I find that deeper wading (as often occurs in the middle of a slow pool) increases the difficulty of aligning a single spey D-loop and anchor perpendicular the river current. If shallower downstream angle casts work well, but cross current casts don't, then focus effort on a straight anchor path and the "180 degree rule"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Steve: Yes, the forward cast is colliding with itself. If I follow what you are saying: The angle between my target and my "poke" (the slight upward and rearward motion of the rod tip when finishing the D Loop, just before starting the forward cast) on the D Loop side is less than 180 degrees. Is that right?

When you say a straight anchor path, what do you mean? Do you mean placing the anchor and leader parallel to the current?

I am sure I was casting inside the anchor and as you surmised I was wading deeper in the middle slower part of the run.

I always get better more consistent casts in faster water. It may be my release is more consistent.

Scott (I can't remember his last name-Jedi-Master or close-Guides on the Dean and he and Lana have a camp on the Inklin) had me work on my release this year. Says that he feels the "release" is the key to a good cast.

Thanks for your input

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
639 Posts
Mark
It might not be a bad idea to take a look at the anchor point. Fast water creates more tension on the line, most will not overpower the lift and get what I call a stuck anchor. When we are casting say up to our waist in slow moving water we tend to hurry the lift, drop the tip while forming the D-loop and also pile up the anchor. You will hear the splash of a piled anchor, which will result in to a real nice bloody L and can cause in some cases a bad tailing loop. Try a higher lift in slow deep water and keep the lift slow and smooth. Also you must observe the 180 degree rule as steve stated above and make your casts slightly inside the D-Loop that you create.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,112 Posts
Hi Mark,

Super good advise from both Steve and Brian.

I think that the dangle in slow water can be a bit challanging to un-hinge, and inherently this scenairo will often times have you waist deep in water.

My analogy to this situation would be to lift the dangle as easily as you would lift the spent presentation of a single hand dry line when fishing to gulpers from a float tube.

...To not spook the feeding gulper <> The spent presentation must be lifted slowly, evenly, and high <> With as little fuss on the top water as possible as to not spook the fish for the next presentation....

This is how the dangle should best be lifted from slack water to acheive a full release prior to the change of direction: Slow, easy, and compleate.

Watch for the fly to surface wake and/or the leader to show.

When lifted with excessive authority <> Too much hinged line can remain, and will result in stealing power from the rod....Power that could best be reserved for setting up the forward delivery.

The 1367 MKS does have tons of reserve, and is a real grain eater <> But she likes to be worked sweetly, with a relaxed delivery and economy of motion.

My guess is you may be working just a little too hard....It's OK to be lazy ....};^)...!!!

Another thing that may help when standing in deeper water with longer belly management is to actually start setting up the rod for the forward delivery prior to the upstream anchor.

This will help keep your line in the air, allowing the upstream anchor to an absolute minimum.... And again: Will not steal potential forward delivery power from the rod.

....You'll then hear that tell-tale clean little "hisssss" at the anchor rather then the sound of what Simon calls: Slurping soup.

Meiz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Guys.

You gave me some things to look at. I'll try and recreate the problem and see what fixes it. I am sure I am overpowering things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi Rick:

I don't have access to one but will see if the local library can get me a copy. The problem around here is that there is no water big enough to practice casting on. Even with this 6/7 and just the head of the Snowbee line out, the fly lands 90' out. That, and I don't know of any expert casters around here. Everyone I know is a fisherman, like me, that has to travel 400 miles to the nearest steelhead water (OK 300 in a couple of weeks when the fish get in the Salmon R.) and only casts to fish.

Did you get up to Silver Creek this year?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,736 Posts
Mark,
Can't tell you how excited I am to see that the creek is back!!! Hit it for a week the first of August and had great fishing to with tricos, baetis and callibaetis!!!

Next year lets meet at the bridge and we can cast spey rods to the bridge fish :hihi:
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top