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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just built a 14' 8-9 weight rod & it's the 1st 2-handed rod I've ever had in my hands. :eek: I want to start out w/an intermediate & a sinking line & I don't have any real idea what lines to go with. I'll be doing as much (or more) overhead casting as I will spey casting, so take that into consideration w/your recommendations.

Thanks for your help!

Mark
 

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Mark, let 'us' know what blank you've ..

built the rod on. (Suckie English .. but so's my casting). This really does make a difference.
:whoa:
 

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Mark,

When I was back at Cape Cod a couple of years ago I used a 13 Loop rod in the surf for overhead casting. I used a Loop Shooting head system and a stripping basket - it really rocked. I had a floater, an intermediate and a full sinker.
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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Mark -

Welcome to the fraternity of the two-handed coastal angler :)

As Kush says, your casting will rock. There are great benefits and economies of motion available to you once you learn to align the longer overhand stroke.

As Fred points out, each rod will favor a certain grain weight over the length of the head of the line that suits your needs.

If you plan to spey cast, an appropriate taper of 44-100+ would be the length range you might want. The rod will most likely accept grains within a range from say 650 grains over 54 feet to almost 1000 grains over 100 feet of head for spey lines.

But for overhand casting, think about the fact that you will strip the fly to the butt knot and want to get the line back out there as quickly as possible. Shorter denser heads with good turnover characteristics are more suited to fishing the beach.

I would begin by experimenting with a cheap running line and shooting heads in the 12 wt range, which are typically around 500-600 grains from Airflo in the 35-45ft lengths; Rio, S/A, etc. This way you can get a handle on the grains that the rod responds to for short money and use that to make additional line purchasing decisions.

Don't think about the line rating for the rod, it only pertains to spey line ratings and even that somewhat loosely.

Focus on grains per length.

.02
 
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