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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there, fishing for winter steel up here in bc. I have been trying to use my 8 wt 11'6" switch rod to dredge the bottom on certain stretches of the river or where there is more flow. I dont have a problem casting .5grams weighted flies with 10 ft t-11. When I try my heavyweights with 1 - 1.3 g head. The cast is ugly and unproductive. Should I try some t14 or am I expecting too much of my setup. 11'6" 8 wt 540 skagit switch 8-10 ft t type leader 4 ft 25 -down to 12 lb maxime.
 

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Knock that leader down to 3-4 feet straight 15 lb maxima. There's no need for a tapered leader when using skagits.

The more weight you are throwing, the more on the ball with the cast. It won't tolerate mistakes or waiting to long, as it will all be sunk by the time you cast it. Personally I like fishing a very lightly weighted fly (just enough to break surface tension), and do the rest with tips. Feels more precise then playing with two variables.

A 540 skagit should be able to cast 12 feet of t14 without issue. I've done up to 15 on a 525 skagit
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ok. Will do with the leader. This time of year seems like you need to feel bottom once and a while. Unless im in dead calm water. Unweighted I feel less. I like to knoe for sure im in the zone cause till it warms fish dont like to move to the fly.
 

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JD
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Convention

Knock that leader down to 3-4 feet straight 15 lb maxima. There's no need for a tapered leader when using skagits.

The more weight you are throwing, the more on the ball with the cast. It won't tolerate mistakes or waiting to long, as it will all be sunk by the time you cast it
To each his own, and not to knock anyone else. And I've heard people say they are able to cast intruders on T-10. I am, however, a strong proponent of T-14. Why? It is built on 35lb mono core, which I believe to be a vital component in turning over those big heavily weighted intruders. I also strip about two inches of coating off the end of the T-14 to which I attach about 30" of 25lb fluoro via Albright knot. Loop to loop connect the 25lb but section to 20+ inches of 15 lb fluoro. Fluorocarbon not only sinks better than mono, it is also stiffer. Another plus for turning over the big uglies. Still another, even more critical, part of the equation here is what is pushing the T-14? Tip diameter must be of => density (gr/ft) than T-14.

Convention has always dictated the use of short leaders with sinking lines. The theory being that the fly will swim higher than the sunken line. While that may hold true for a normal fly, remember we are way outside the realm of "normal" here. A heavily weighted intruder goes down like a rock! It will, in fact, sink faster than the T-14 to which it is attached.

Upstream shoulder anchors sink quicker than do downstream shoulder anchors. Compensate accordingly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Awesome advice! Ydes did not think about shoule position of anchor relative to leader/fly depth. My shooting head isroughly 27grain per foot.
 

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Personally I like fishing a very lightly weighted fly (just enough to break surface tension), and do the rest with tips. Feels more precise then playing with two variables.
x2!

I use tube flies most of the time, and adjust depth with the tips. I can manage heavier tips better than heavier flies. I'd rather feel my line roll over rocks, than my fly snaggin' one. But that is my .02

Avio :smokin:
 
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