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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody have any experience with battery operated heated socks?? Which brands work well which ones don’t?

my feet and toes have always gotten so cold when winter steelheading, and it can really ruin your day! And trust me, I’ve tried everything from oversized boots and less socks and all that. My fingers amd toes just get colder quicker than most and I’m trying to find a good solution.
Thanks!!!!!
~Alex
 

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A BIG fish is a GOOD fish
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Hydrate well and keep core burning with food and exercise by huffing it between runs. Pulse volume recording (PVR) might be worth it if usual
Stuff doesn’t work.


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I got a pair from Mobile Warming this past spring: Mobile Warming Premium Bluetooth Heated Men's Socks

They are great for maybe two hours. Was out for five hours (in Maine) yesterday and with some chemical heat packs I just made it to the end without being too cold. That said, the other three guys had to get out of the water because they couldn't feel their toes.

I'm debating whether to splurge on boot-foot waders, or add some battery insoles to this system.

So, not an enthusiastic endorsement of the socks; hoping to hear of something else that someone has used and really likes.

I do love this electronic hand warmer: OCOOPA Hand Warmers Rechargeable, 1 Pack 5200mAh Electric Portable Pocket Heater. I dislocated a finger a few years ago and the circulation now is terrible. A few minutes in my pocket with this and I was back in business!
 

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Boot foot waders are the answer. It’s night and day. Get the boot foot a little large, wear some thick wool socks with or without a liner. I have electric heated vests and socks and they just don’t last long enough. The hand warmers seem to need a fresh air supply to really work well and I couldn’t get them to stay hot at my feet.
Jake
 

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flytie09
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I had a pair of the Lenz socks for 7 yrs or so. They work ok… but no comparison for proper fit boots with room in toe and good socks.

Just had one of the batteries crap out on me…. So I’m trying to justify paying $75 for a replacement. I might save my money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Boot foot waders seem like a good option!
I also happened to google for awhile things like “how to keep your feet warm when ice fishing....” etc etc

on this article they said put a plastic bag aroundyour feet before putting socks on. I asked my wife what she thought and she said: “yup, it’s what homeless people do so it probably works!”

Anyway, I’ll let you know how it goes
 

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Boot foot waders seem like a good option!
I also happened to google for awhile things like “how to keep your feet warm when ice fishing....” etc etc

on this article they said put a plastic bag aroundyour feet before putting socks on. I asked my wife what she thought and she said: “yup, it’s what homeless people do so it probably works!”

Anyway, I’ll let you know how it goes
I would think the plastic should work to hold in the heat and keep your feet dry. Worth a try for sure. I know I have worn latex gloves under cloth gloves at work. The cloth gloves would get wet but my hands would be dry inside the latex.
 

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The plastic bag idea went around when I was a kid. Made for cold, sweaty feet. I think you’re better off with two pars of socks and loose fitting boots- boot foot waders better yet. The only way my feet can handle that cold at all is with the chemical warmers. It’s why I cross country skied and snowshoed all winter when I lived back there.
 

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The plastic bag method is supposed to be a vapor barrier - it removes the evaporative heat loss - and is intended to be used in very cold and dry conditions. They are suppose to be used either outside regular socks, or in between layered socks. Very big with the Iditarod guys! There are (or maybe were) even some companies that sold expensive silnylon socks that were shaped and sized, though Wonderbread bags probably are just as good. I still have a pair of those I take backpacking that go over my socks sometimes for sleeping in extra cold conditions. Surgical gloves uder your regular gloves can have a similar effect, which is pretty large in comparison to the minimal added bulk.

I’ve never tried them, but everything I ever heard about them has been that boot footed waders are night and day better for warmth.

As for me, my hands are always the first to go. Give me some electric gloves, if there are any! :)
 

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Loose fitting boots - either boot foot or stocking foot, so you don't cut off warm blood circulation. I have no recent experience with heated socks. But, before you invest, try an inexpensive experiment - buy some "Hot Hands Insole Foot Warmers". They come two to a pack and have an adhesive tape that sticks to your socks. I wear a lighter liner sock - wool or a wicking type of material, adhesive foot warmer sticks to this, and a heavy merino wool sock over that. They last me a good 7 hours or more. They are cheap enough and have been total game changers for me and my friends.

Most feet sweat, so at the end of the day the boot area is a little damp. If I'm fishing consecutive days I always turn my stocking foot waders inside out after a long day of fishing so they are dry on the inside by morning. Putting a dry foot and sock into a a clammy boot just starts a cold day off on the wrong, err - foot ;)

I use those oxygen activated chemical hand warmers inserted in my fleece half finger gloves. I carry a second pair of gloves to switch out if my first pair get too wet. I purchased a fleece hand muff that has a zip pocket where I can insert hand warmers. Cast, mend, set my swing, and insert hand into muff and repeat the process. Alternate hands after the cast if my rod hand needs warming. Using that swing time to warm my line hand helps a lot. Also delays me in prematurely setting up on a fish, lol.

Not saying these tactics will work for you, but they sure have made my winter steelheading a lot more comfortable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
So I’my research thus far, and going by all of
Your input (thank you immensely for that guys!),

The boot foot waders, seem to be absolutely the game changer. Being in Northern Michigan, my winter steelhead season isn’t really that long, so a pair of Frog Toggs might suit me well vs a pair of Simms G3.
Since I’m not going to buy a pair of waders this year, I think I’m going to try the foot sole warmers taped to the 1st layer of socks. I also ordered a pair of ‘Snow Deer’ rechargeable battery socks. Says on low setting you get 6 hours with 2 lithium recharable batteries. Recharge time is 3 hours. I like the idea of recharable because if you replace batteries everyday you would probably equal the cost to a brand new pair of Simms G3 waders!
So, 2 packs of insole warmers and a pair of heated socks for $100. I’ll let you know how it goes friends!
 
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You Heard Me
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A hack one of my clients came up with was wear a pair of thin dress socks then put on the neoprene wet wedding socks and cut that metal clip off the top. Then get into your waders. The only expensive part is buying a wading boot 2 sizes larger than your street shoe to accommodate the double layer of neoprene. A great hack, it’s like having boot foot waders but a 10th of the price
 

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Loose fitting boots - either boot foot or stocking foot, so you don't cut off warm blood circulation. I have no recent experience with heated socks. But, before you invest, try an inexpensive experiment - buy some "Hot Hands Insole Foot Warmers". They come two to a pack and have an adhesive tape that sticks to your socks. I wear a lighter liner sock - wool or a wicking type of material, adhesive foot warmer sticks to this, and a heavy merino wool sock over that. They last me a good 7 hours or more. They are cheap enough and have been total game changers for me and my friends.

Most feet sweat, so at the end of the day the boot area is a little damp. If I'm fishing consecutive days I always turn my stocking foot waders inside out after a long day of fishing so they are dry on the inside by morning. Putting a dry foot and sock into a a clammy boot just starts a cold day off on the wrong, err - foot ;)

I use those oxygen activated chemical hand warmers inserted in my fleece half finger gloves. I carry a second pair of gloves to switch out if my first pair get too wet. I purchased a fleece hand muff that has a zip pocket where I can insert hand warmers. Cast, mend, set my swing, and insert hand into muff and repeat the process. Alternate hands after the cast if my rod hand needs warming. Using that swing time to warm my line hand helps a lot. Also delays me in prematurely setting up on a fish, lol.

Not saying these tactics will work for you, but they sure have made my winter steelheading a lot more comfortable.
I completely endorse DryflyBum’s approach! It’s what I do almost to a tee, but haven’t added the muff yet. I put two hand warmers into my wader’s hand pouch and that’s where I warm them during the swing.
 
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