Spey Pages banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
18 foot spey rod DV8
Joined
·
439 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a duplicate vintage 3 1/2 spitfire Salmon Perfect in my collection that no longer gets any quality time on steelie or salmon water. These fine reels were made to be fished and not relegated to a display cabinet so It needs a good home.
Although the reel is not stamped with his initials, the flawless craftsmanship of this spitfire has all the signs of Jimmy Smiths artestry. This reel is in excellent condition with a revolving nickel silver line and an adjustable DP II check. There are no issues with this reel’s appearance or performance. The ribbed 3 1/8 inch foot dates the reel from 1927 to 1939. The foot will fit on most modern graphite and vintage and modern hollowbuilt cane wands.
This is an exquisite reel for a discerning angler......$1200. US plus shipping/ins and Pay Pal fees

As an added incentive, I’ll also make a Steelhead dream package deal available, this reel paired with the mint unfished 12 foot Sharpes spliced impregnated 8/9 wt. cane rod with an extra tip.....$1800 US plus shipping/ins and Pay Pal fees.

The fly line, backing and Neroda fly case are not included in the package but can be negotiated.


Regards from Canada....Jim
378830
378831
378832
378833
378834
378838
 

·
18 foot spey rod DV8
Joined
·
439 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
So is this 1800 for the complete package?
Yes. $1800. US plus shipping,ins, and PPal fees. This is a bargain as a JS spitfire 3 1/2 inch Duralumin reel is worth more than that.
These two rare items are in mint condition. If you like greased linking with silk or dry line fishing, this is the ultimate outfit for Chromers. This Sharpes 12 footer can be roll or spey cast and handle a Wulff TT spey line with an 80 foot head which is great for reducing stripping, coiling and shooting line. This is great outfit for winter steelheading as only the line head is in contact with the water and the 20 or 30 feet of running line can be kept elevated by the rod tip and kept dry to avoid iced up guides.This vintage unfished 1965 era switch rod is a little heftier than a modern hollow built switch as it has a double built butt and midsection and a 10 degree swelled splice at each section for added strength for traditional spey casting. This versatile rod will handle mid belly 40 to 55 foot spey and floating and sinking CD Scandi lines. This rod is also an effective double hand over head caster for dry fly fishing.
Regards.....Jim
 

·
18 foot spey rod DV8
Joined
·
439 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Would there be either the 'D' or J.S stamped inside the reel?
No, but that’s an interesting question. As I indicated in the first post, there are no stamping of any kind on the interior face plate or frame of this reel. I collect JS spitfire reels “In The Clear” finish aluminium alloy as well as in the Duralum and Hidulimium finish. This 1927 to 1939 era reel has the Duralumin ringer brignt lustre compared to the duller finish of the Hiduminium flat silver grey or the silver sheen of the aluminium alloy.

The exquisite craftsmanship of this reel has all the signs of Jimmy Smith’s artistry with his renowned Spitfire reels for which he gained fame as one of Hardy’s premier reel smiths. When I attended and participated in the Hardy Cup Casting competition at the Catskills Centre and used this reel, Hardy reps and collectors examined it and came to the same conclusion.

Although unsigned, this is the finest reel in my Spitfire collection.
As it is not identified with a D or the signature JS, I have priced it below its probable value. This reel is one of nicest Spits I have seen in over 50 years of collecting vintage Hardy reels. Sadly, as I’m sure you’re aware, not all Salmon Perfect reels were stamped to help us determine their history.

Here's is photo of a variety of my JS made spitfire reels with this Salmon Perfect on the left with its glossy lustrous finish and a Hiduluminium 3 3/8 trout St George on the lower right with its flat greyer finish. The trout 3 5/8 inch Contracted Perfect on the lower left and the three Salmon Perfects 3 1/2, 4 and 4 1/4 in the rear are all the aluminium alloy spitfire finish.

Regardless of their finish or maker, I think these vintage Spitfire models are among best crafted and attractive reels Hardy produced.

Regards....Jim

378948
 

·
Registered
ACR, Echo DHII, Danielsson, Leland, Hardy, Rio, Airflo
Joined
·
3,724 Posts
No, but that’s an interesting question. As I indicated in the first post, there are no stamping of any kind on the interior face plate or frame of this reel. I collect JS spitfire reels “In The Clear” finish aluminium alloy as well as in the Duralum and Hidulimium finish. This 1927 to 1939 era reel has the Duralumin ringer brignt lustre compared to the duller finish of the Hiduminium flat silver grey or the silver sheen of the aluminium alloy.
The exquisite craftsmanship of this reel has all the signs of Jimmy Smith’s artistry with his renowned Spitfire reels and although unsigned, was the finest reel in my collection.
As it is not identified with a D or the signature JS, I have priced it below its probable value. This reel is one of nicest Spits I have seen in over 50 years of collecting vintage Hardy reels. Sadly, as I’m sure you’re aware, not all Salmon Perfect reels were stamped to help us determine their history.
Here's is photo of a variety of my JS made spitfire reels with this Salmon Perfect on the left with its glossy lustrous finish and a Hiduluminium 3 3/8 trout St George on the lower right with its flat greyer finish. The trout 3 5/8 inch Contracted Perfect on the lower left and the three Salmon Perfects 3 1/2, 4 and 4 1/4 in the rear are all the aluminium alloy spitfire finish.
Regards....Jim
Who in the world would have time to fish Jim with all the history of this sport you have gathered between those ears. It would be like cramming for a PHD, Every post you let us view I learn something new.

Please don't stop.... Podcast material possibly.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
With much respect, we have all become experts since the Drewett tome on Hardy reels came out- Hardy Brothers. The Masters the men and their Reels and of course since the internet.
For my part I was once invited by said author to peruse with him, most of the Hardy reels featured in his definite book on the subject including some of the very rarest. We talked of reel finishes- John had been advising beforehand on some of my early researches and experiments in 'black- leading' of Hardy reels.
Another notable researcher and author on fishing tackle, Stefan Duma, wrote on the subject of so called Spitfire reels on another forum:

'Hardy and the Spitfire reels, the definitive history.

Many years ago there was an English tackle dealer Jamie Maxtone Graham, son of the author who wrote Mrs Minerva. He discovered that there was a market for old reels especially in Germany. He came across some war time production reels and to differentiate them from ordinary reels he called them by the one thing that German collectors could identify with Spitfire. These reels were usually made by Jimmy Smith stamped inside J.S. no duplicated MkII check just a single one sometimes with a white ivorine handle and always left in the white. It was wartime and they produced reels with what was available.
Jamie was a bit of a rascal and realised that he could charge more for the Spitfire reels and was not above having them polished. Others dubious people did the same. So popular where they that even Hardy's decided to make "Spitfire" finished reels.
Other wild theories put forward They were made from the rejected pistons of the engines for the Spitfire. A great theory, Hardy's were in Alnwick, Spitfire made in Castle Bromwich Birmingham engines in Derby, all that transporting of rejected pistons to make Hardy reels.
Another is the Z reels made from the pistons of a Dornier aeroplane that crash landed near Melrose.
When polishing the reels to produce Spitfire finish its almost impossible to remove the bronzing and lacquer from the internal edges of the reel and a magnifying glass will usually reveal the truth.
Like the Germans said "Actung Spitfire!"
...............

Duralumin 'D' stamped in reels (Aluminium/ copper/ manganese/ magnesium) high strength low weight alloy developed and used in aerospace and aircraft.
Hiduminium 'H' stamped in reels. (Aluminium/ copper/ nickel/ magnesium/ silicon also used in aircraft.
Hardys were early adopters of early aluminium for their Perfects and also used other metals for their reels.
My take on the various 'bright' reels is that after they had their own foundry in the 1930's Hardys could cast their reels themselves, so, if on a given day they would cast a batch of larger sea reels such as the Fortuna or Alma, from Monel, Dural or Hiduminium there may have been some molten metal left over- I can imagine them reaching for a 'chill' mold of a smaller fly reel, to use it up.
They did make 'clear' finished fly reels of various models. These were of regular 'pot metal' from the foundry, but instead of being black-leaded they were polished and a coat of lacquer applied. Over time most of these reels have lost the protective lacquer and reverted to their somewhat dull former appearance. These reels are 'granular' grey colour in appearance when the metal is examined closely. On impact the reels fractured relatively easily.
The 'H' and 'D' reels are quite different, retaining a bright silver shine without further polishing or lacquer. On tapping a spool with a pencil it will ring with a high and long tone. The metal is hard and 'slippery' to the touch having almost an oily feel. Some will be stamped some not. Silex Majors plus Super Silex's made for export to the West Coast were sometimes 'H' as the metal was not prone to corrosion if used in the salt. I have one, stamped in both the frame and the drum which retains its very bright silver finish. Where lightness and strength were required Dural was often used, for example for the frame of the Hardy Jock Scott reel, which was anodized black. The bright rotors and drums of the range of Hardy Altex 'thread line' reels are Dural. as were many rod components.

John Drewett was to meet Jimmy Smith (1894- 1989) and his nephew Thomas Armstrong, also a Hardy reel maker (T.A.G) . Included in his book are several pages dedicated to both men and their stories of working at the firm.

Jim and I have met and I have seen up close some of his very fine reels and I wish him well with his sale.

The reels below are characteristic of the bright metals described, the 'J.S' stamped 1930's 2 7/8" Uniqua fly reel, similar vintage Hardy Altex 1, plus the aforementioned 4" Silex Major 'H' - I differ from Jim's view that 'H' reels are flat and grey- as can be seen.


Malcolm

378956
378957
 

Attachments

·
Registered
ACR, Echo DHII, Danielsson, Leland, Hardy, Rio, Airflo
Joined
·
3,724 Posts
HMMM................ now you have put me in the crosshairs and I am not impressed, up to now I have managed to maintain some balance in my wallet from not having an affection or like for that matter in Classic/Vintage Reels.. Important note about the previous sentence " up until now". I have been a modern reel guy and with that comes some control over Micro and Macro Economics.

These Smith's have my visual juices flowing, I find them simplistic beautiful and very classy.

Now for you experts what is a good way to get started on the Smith Journey into Classic Reels without causing my wife an aneurism. All I currently have in the how to is pinch a ton of money away until I can pull the trigger but that will be difficult due to the fact as most of you already know "Hello my name is Wayne and I am a Shopoholic"

Devine Intervention or Exorcism is not an Option
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
It may be remembered that Jimmy Smith was one of many Hardy reel 'finishers', meaning he fitted the reels together at the bench from parts made by others at the firm to a set design- it just so happened he worked at Hardys for a very long time.
Personally I don't think a fly reel made by J.S would be made much differently to one by his nephew, whom he would work opposite to at the bench.
In my somewhat limited experience of collecting, to those of modest means, strange but true- reels tend to find us.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top