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Hi from a first timer to this board. I've been directed here by Bob Meiser because of the wide range of knowledge and experince that you people have. I'm going to be building my first spey rod over the up coming cold winter. I've done some homework and have short listed the St. Croix SCII 14' 9/10 wt. as the blank I will probably pick. I'd appreciate any info on that blank. I was also wondering about any advantage of using all ceramic guides, as apposed to traditional wire snake guides. I'm thinking of long time wear, and less friction while casting. I have built single handed rods in the past, so know the basics, but would be open to any of your suggestions or comments. Thanks in advance....Paul
 

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GUIDES ON A DOUBLE FISTER

I can't comment about the St. Croix blank. I'm sure it's a good solid rod. I can comment about guides, however. I've built a closet full of double handers and I would strongly recommend sticking to wire snake guides. Biggest reason: Ceramics (other than stripping guides) have small inside diameters: not good for cold-weather fishing!

They also tend to be single-foot. Wonderful for speed wrapping but they tend to loosen up under their thread wraps (and will pull out if you snag them on a branch when bush-wacking).

My recommendation: get large diameter wire snakes (the Gold Hopkins & Holloway are really classy looking and hold up over time.) They're also much easier to clear ice from then ceramic guides and I would think that in your neck of the woods, that would be a prime concern. By the way, to minimize friction, go for over-size stripping guides (at least two, maybe even three; again, the gold H&H are the coolest if your wallet is willing to go along for the ride).

Check out an off-the-rack Sage 7136-4 or 7141-4. They've figured all that stuff out: sizing of strippers and snakes/spacing of both. Good luck.

Marketic
 

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I'd reccomend build it light ,wind er' tight,oh ,that's another, older hobbie,,i've a couple for sale; brand new for 200.00,used: 150.00,smells like fish though,,,i'll pick up the freight,,if you build one,remember a couple ounces of jewelry makes a diff.,plus i'd highly recomend a wulff triangle 9-10 line,personal thing,don't overline em',they CAN be a sweet piece, if you don't bury them in line wt.anyway;;go get em'''''
 

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Paul,

Use nake guides that will seem large for the rod. I.e. use #5,4,and 3 snake guides and a #20 and #16 stripper 9although you could get by with #16 and 12 strippers). Also use either a large loop pear-shaped top or a large ceramic (#10 or 12) top. These will keep the line from getting trapped against the blank or binding in the top when casting. I would also go with either the gold titanium oxide guides Marketic spoke about or the TiCH guides rather than standard chrome plated ones. The TiCH have the lowest coefficient of friction and also are ice up the least.

The blank is a good moderate action 2-hander that works well with either 9/10 or better yet 8/9 spey lines.
 

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Hi Paul
I'll echo the recommendations in the previous post with one addendum.IMHO use Pacbay TiCh snakes(light andWON'T wear out in your lifetime) If you want the spacing ,I could provide that also.
Cheers
Brian
 
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