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Redington Dually 8116 Rod, Echo TR 4120 Rod, Redington Grande 7/8/9 Reel, Lamson ARX 3.5 Reel
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I've been looking at these Guideline 3D+ and ULS 3D+ heads and wondered if anyone has first hand experience with these for their Scandi heads? What other benefits are having a triple density head instead of a floating head with tips ? I realize that these can be fished without a polyleader so it brings the fly closer to your rod tip which supposedly leads to better control and feeling of what is going on at the business end of the line. The triple density is also supposed to allow for slower swings and a straight line connection to the fly, but in the real world how much of this is experienced by the angler? Just wanted some first hand knowledge before I pull the trigger on one to try out. TIA
 

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I have been using the Guideline 3D for 3 years and the 4D during this past spring salmon fishing. The manufacturer has a lot of information through pro-guides that will explain the "angle" and "level" of the fly in relation to the running line, and how the fish like this better. I'm not sure on all that, but I can say with confidence that I am a better caster with these systems. The fly swing does seem truer (like closer to a traditional floating system". It's a breeze to pick up and get the entire shooting head to the top water before the cast. I've watched some of the videos with Frodin and his pal Norling, and their casting styles have helped lot, especially when boat fishing.
Hope this helps.
 

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Similar to Halifaxangler, I have been using the Guideline PowerTaper 3D for many years and they cast and fish well. I am particular fond of the FHI. The faster sink lines join me for winter.

When experimenting with a couple of 13' rods, I prefer these Guideline 3D lines over a traditional tip line like a NextCast Winter for throwing spey flies.

But I do not have experience to compare the lines and do not believe I can articulate why they are 'better' in the water, but I believe I can see-feel the drift swing easier.
 

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They are very popular here in Norway, I have only experience with the 3d+. I think that they are quite easy casting, but there is better options out there IMO.
 

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The older original Guideline Triple-D was a much better line than the new guideline 3d+ For instance at 44 ' and 602 grains the Triple-D 9/10 f/h/i line is IMHO way better than the new Guideline 9/10 3D+ f/h/i at 38' and 570 grains .That 6 extra feet really seems to make a difference .. . Only drawback was ,there was no rear loop so you had to make your own .
 

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Well, there are different casting performances due to the taper and the head lengths of these two Guideline Scandi Controlled Density models. I have enjoyed fishing with both models and would agree the original, that could be trimmed to better suite various rods, was a versatile caster.
I find both of these Scandi lines perform better when precisely presented and mended at distances best suited to the action and length of your rod. An initial down stream roll cast after fishing out the swing through the dangle, will position the line leader and fly on the surface which can then be easily switched, rolled, or spey cast and mended, for a precision presentation.
I’ve found the newer 3D+ model with the shorter head, especially in the faster sinking configurations, to have enhanced performance and sensitivity, from 3 feet under on a salmon river in the high fast flows of spring or 15 feet down along the banks of the Niagara in the winter. Here is Restigouche Springer that slammed a size 1 Chartreuse Stone fly on a F/I/S2 fished on Sharpes spliced cane 15 footer.
Water Plant Hat Lake Outdoor recreation

I particularly like their casting and fishing compatibility with spliced cane switch and spey rods. The one piece sensitivity of these rods and CD lines can easily detect a tug, but also allow a speyer to sense a weightless upstream take on the dangle. The taper design of these Scandi heads allow the down stream current to hold, pull and rotate the fly for a better hook set in the scissors.
Regards from the Restigouche...Jim
 

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Both lines have their pros and cons.
I have some of them, both models on different sink rates and weights. Also have the old models of original 3D´s. Some of new ones are better than old ones and opposite way..

-I think the most biggest difference compared other brands is behavior of the line. For example Rio have quite ”smooth” lines when you cast them, but Guideline have always been more ”aggressive” flight, which comes, I believe, from different (harder) coating.The coating plays a big role which kind of flight the line have and how much the line speed can be create, of course depending the casting style, or better said how hard you can hit the rod with out destroying the cast

-Also the sink rate between GL and many other brand is different. GL have a Real Sinking Heads, and they really sink. Again, for example the Rio sink 6 is more or less like GL sink 4.

- You can have similar swing with many lines (brands) if they are made with same construction (2D, 3D, 4D or what ever...)

-I think 3D and 3D+ are pretty good lines for ”Scandi” casting (I still dont get it.. Scandi cast is just a Spey cast)

-Any lines can be used with out Polyleader.

Hope this helps..
 
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