Spey Pages banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey Gang:

Thinking about different approaches to fishery management... When I worked on the Kenai River, there was a limited number of permits to allow guide operations on the Upper River. It was tightly regulated and the total number of permits available was capped for each season. Each guide was allowed to fish five days a week (and they and an employee were limited to two boats per permit).

Where else have similar limits or regulations been established for commercial (guided sport fishing) operations?

I'm curious where regulations have been necessary for popular waters and what systems seem to work best?

What are good examples ?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
817 Posts
In bc we have a classified waters system that only allows so many rod days and none residents can’t fish on weekends.
 

·
Broken Down Spey Freak
Joined
·
1,898 Posts
To my knowledge here in Ontario there is no permit/license required to guide. I would think they would need a business license though as with any business. The only regulation would be the MNRF fishing regulations put out every year. A good idea though would be first aid and cpr training for sure. Another would be proper insurance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
In Oregon only a few systems limit the number of permits for guides. North Umpqua and the Deschutes are it I believe. The rest is wide open. I think it has to change...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
In WA there are more fishing guides than places for them to float or launch their boats. Guides are very much part of the problem when it comes to degrading the overall quality of the angling experience. The only limitation on guides is the $250 license, CPR training, and general liability insurance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
I have said this before in other forums but recreational guides definitely need to be managed for two reasons: 1) from an overall quality experience (downside is that can be hard to define, how many are too many?) and 2) from a biological impact to the fish population, taking into account harvest and C&R. In the past neither of these may have been needed but as more and more anglers fish over less and less fish, both are much more important than what they used to be.

If I had my way, I'd have the area fish biologists provide me with scientific data, based on catch information (not perfect but no data is ever is) and then determine what biological impact is acceptable, based on escapements, ESA, etc. Then I'd do some angler surveys asking what is acceptable on issues like crowding and what determines a quality experience. By combining both datasets, side boards can be established based on biological impacts and social expectation. Then you set the number of guide days on any given system based on the data, using a systematic approach. BC does something similar to this. Finally, because it is a public resource, you open the number of guide days available based on the highest bidder, which will be based on supply and demand...trips will be in demand, more than the supply so guides can charge a premium for trips. The money goes back into monitoring the fishery so as to be somewhat self funding into the future.

Those are some ideas I'd implement but nobody has asked me yet. Or we can just keep it as one big, happy free for all, like what we have in Washington State until there is no fish left to guide anglers.
 

·
surfing sucks dont try it
Joined
·
125 Posts
BC talks a good game but they have the same problem with too many guides and too many guide days that some lower 48 states do. It’s a real problem. Guides, after all, are hired for their expertise. And for many of those guides, they really are experts on determining where fish are and what will attract them. Put too many experts on the water who’s income is at least partially based on how well they do putting their clients on fish, and suddenly you’ve got fishing pressure that the fishery can’t withstand. It’s a piece of a complicated problem that must be addressed.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top