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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings, between hiding from weekend crowds and the dire need of finishing up my taxes to the "Guvmint", I was taking my break and going through the sight.
Read several post regarding Greenheart and was wondering if anyone is still fishing with them from time to time. I have one that is 13' and throws a DT 9 it is quite old and I only use it sparingly on small races of steelhead in dry climes (if you know what I mean).
This particular rod has a Lance wood tip Actually it has three and a second mid section (can't imagine why they only made one butt section). I imagine if I broke it all up I could still use the Butt for a wading staff!!
Seriously though it is fun to cast with and like several have stated they are slow and deliberate, describing rod action is alot like rating vintage wine kind of abstract with alot of personal prejudice thrown in for good measure. It is the oldest thing I own it was built some time in the 1860 in england and unlike cane has no glue or lamination problems to contend with. I imagine the fellow who sold it figured it was going in a collection to be viewed only. Well the Maker intended it too be fished and I will continue to do that from time to time. At some point I'm sure it will fracture and then I will scarf it back together and retire it for Viewing only.
I have been looking around for a suitable cane two hander but with the spiral delamination problems that are so prvelant I have not had much luck in finding what I think I need. One of my biggest failings has always been my failure to not take notes when I finally run into someone with the right information! A year or so ago a fellow told me of a maker of cane that had no problem with this spiral delamination does anybody no which maker it might be?
 

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Greenheart is still used!

Hello "Moonlight"

It is good to hear that I am not the only one who fancy those old rods. Nothing can beat the slow action when casting and the great feeling of playing fish!
Personly I fish a 13`Greenheart rod in pristine condition. Balanced by a Perfect 3 3/4 and a Dt 10 it casts very good.

I also have an old Hardy Palakona "The Hi-Regan" 15 1/2 foot(!) rod for larger rivers. It gives the expression "heavy fishing" a whole new meaning!

See my site about salmonfishing in Southern Norway
http://end.at/salmonfishing

regards
Petter Wikören, Norway
 

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Petter,

In the web site General Information it states that Disinfecting tackle when fishing is required and their are cleaning stations along the river.

First time I have ever heard of that practice. What started that in Norway?

Don't beleive there are any rivers here in North America with that practice.

Hal
 

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Didsinfecting tackle

Hello Hal and thank You for visiting my site!

The reason for such disinfection stations are the parasite Gyrodactelus Salaris which have killed many salmon stocks here in Norway. Today around 20 large rivers are infected, and if anglers are not careful the list could be longer. We have very little to battle this parasite when first it has got foothold in the river, apart from Rotenon, a biological poison which kills everything in the river.
However simple measures can save our salmon stocks. Therefor we have put up such stations(not all river have these pumps). In fact they are not more than a hand pump containig Vircon S, a water based solution which kills any Gyro effectively. You see, the Gyro can survive quite a long time on wet tackle such as felt soles etc. So when fishing in Norway one needs to disinfect Your tackle, or at least make sure Your tackle is completely dry.
The Gyrodactelus Salaris is the largest threat to our rivers and if You haven`t this parasite "over ther" You should be grateful.

Salmonfishing in Norway

regards
Petter Wikören
 

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Petter,

Very interesting you learn something every day in this sport.

Was not aware of that parasite. Nothing here in the U.S. to my knowledge.

Best Regards,

Hal
 

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My God! How big

is that monster in the photo. Any larger and the fish would be holding you.
:whoa:
 

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Fred,

Forget Oregon lets head to Southern Norway.

That Atlantic Salmon is a sure 35 lbs in my estimation.

We will have to figure out how to wash our tackle though.

It would be worth it for a chance at a fish like that.

Wonder if my frequent flyer miles would get me to Norway, I think so.

Hal
 

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Welcome to Norway

Hello and good evening

Well, the salmon on the picture is not more than some 28lbs, but if You look closer, You`ll see that I have darkened the background of the picture and lighted the fish. This makes it appear larger than what it really was....
It is a good fish though.

regards
Petter W
 

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Disinfecting tackle

Sorry forgot the tackle...
You should make sure all Your tackle is completely dry as this will kill the parasite effectively. If You want to be 100% sure You disinfect with Vircon S as well. Ask the local vet, he will help You.

As for flight and prices I`m afraid it would take some flight points...

regards
Petter W
 

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Peeter,

My first guess was 30lbs but then looked at the thickness of the fish and added 5lbs. Not a bad estimate for a somewhat deceiving picture.

Oh well great fish and picture !

Have to look up that disease and learn more about it.

Hal
 

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Discussion Starter #11
They use rotonone

Well I guess that explains why there so many of the streams with only small introduced fish! One of the hot topics in Alaskan politics in the last 20 years was the introduction of large scale fish farming. Principaly with Atlantic Salmon from Norway, those pesky commercial fishers kept rallying to the gates and kept the barbarians at bay. There is a state law against Fish Farming in Alaska.
One of the many factors in the Legislature passing that law was the information that came out of Norway regarding Salmon Farms and there less than beneificial impact on wild stocks.
I read a report where they had gone into the rivers at the head of the Fjiord's where there were pens and used Rotonone to eliminate the Parasite infested Ferral Salmon of the native stream.
The story we got was that the fish in the Pens (which were reported to be in most Fjiords were having problems with the Pathogens that were found (dormant) in native (Ferral) populations.
It was reported that the soloution was simple to go and eliminate the Pathogens ( and everything else in the Native Stream) by using Rototnone. I always hoped in my heart of hearts that this was just overly zealous propaganda but the fact that" Norwegian Salmon" says in his web site that most of those rivers had much larger fish but have since been replaced with smaller fish lights a very bright and burning bulb in my poor and simple brain. I think I will have to partake of a research trip to the librarys of the Universitys in Alaska and see if I can find the truth.
 

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Thats why Norway and Alaska has the disease problem fish farms.

None of these in the Great Lakes to my knowledge and there better never be. We have healthy salmon and steelhead populations.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
PM there are very few disease problems in Alaska mainly because we don't have any imported fishes. Thats why the Legislatuer passed the bill outlawing salmon farms. I'm really glad that you folks have such great fishing on non native stocks its a wonderful testament to what can be accomplished with aquaculture. But as I'm sure you are aware the native species of the Great Lakes are diminished from there former numbers. Which may or not be a function of the introduced species, I suspect it had more to do with the St. Laurence Seaway and the invasion of other species (lamprey)in that fashion. Kind of like the parasites in Norway.
A good friend of mine moved back your way 4 or 5 years ago and has many good things to say about his life there. Mainly that everyone he meets on the rivers is a complete Gentleman or Lady including those who are Guiding for profit (he was a guide in Forks starting in the mid, no early seventys.) And is still plying his trade primarily on the PM, things are so good that ,we, don't seem to be able to pry him loose to come out here to the Left Coast and play.
Heard word from him not too long ago that all was well. Hope the same is happening for you.
 

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Rotenone

Hello Moonlight

I`am glad to hear that You do not have the same problems "over there".
However it is not the use of Rotenone that have led to smaller fish in many rivers. Rotenone has only been used in a few rivers, and with varying luck. Personly I am very sceptical to this method.

The real reason for the small fish are that many native salmon stocks were killed by pollution, both domestic and abroad. Many totally wiped out. The increase in catches we now see are a product of the hard work to get stocks back.Hatcherys and habitat improvement, together with banning of drift nets in the sea and strict pollution politics ensure better conditions for our beloved fish. The reason that we have a low average weight to our fish is because the stocks have not yet reached their full potencial. Have in mind that the positive work really began in the mid 80`s and 90`s.
I believe that in the near future we again will see those monster salmon in Southern Norway rivers, as the Salmon again gets a strong foothold.

regards
Petter W
 

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Moonlight,

Yes our fisherires are currently good here in the Midwest. Everyone who fishes the PM tends to fall in love with it particularly if they hit it during peak times. Actually it is such a scenic river that even when the day was zero for fish (even hits !) you are still grateful you had the opportunity to fish it. There are also many other rivers in the Great Lakes that have good andromous fishing and are scenic etc. I can see why your friend is hard to pry out to the West Coast again.

I have myself cancelled trips to the PNW to fish when there so much equal or better opportunities in the Great Lakes states. Particularly since I know where, when and how to fish here now why take a big risk on waters I do not know.

Hal
 

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Moonlight,
You obviously have a good grasp of Alaska fisheries and fish politics. I'd assumed you were from WA or OR or somewhere else down south but guess now that North West means further North and further west than those locales.

I heard our senior Senator speak favorably of looking into fish farming here a couple weeks ago. And now BC has lifted their moratorium on new fish farms to boot. Not very good news in my mind.

In '98 gillnetters in Sumner Strait were taking quite a few Atlantics. And I've heard stories of juvenile Atlantics found in BC streams and rumors of some being found in our panhandle streams as well. Let's hope for the best. If I find an Atlantic at the end of my line, I'll let you know how it tastes.

Sorry. I've no idea on where to find natural fiber stick like you're looking for.

pescaphile
 
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