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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am obviously new to fishing two handers and am looking for some advise on lining my Scott LS2 1408 for swinging the larger GL tribs. I was looking at 3 different lines specifically and would like to know what you spey guru's would suggest for both a beginning caster and a line for once I have became more advanced in my two handed casting techniques. I am trying to decide between the Rio Skagit, Rio Windcutter Interchangeable tip,and Rio MidSpey to be used with sink tips. Any light you guys could shine on this subject would be greatly appreciated...
 

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if using fast sink tips and heavy flies I would go Skagit, no question. If you mainly use unweighted or lightly weighted flies then any of those systems would work well even with fast sink tips
 

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It depends on your water, fly size and type, and other factors (the usual suspects) but I've had success with mid-Spey lines cut back 15' and type III tips. You can get away with shorter, heavier tips with these setups as well. One other thing to consider is a 14' is a bit much for most GL tribs. Honestly, I don't know Michigan waters that well so if you have wider waters go with it. When they get small you may want a 13' in your arsenal as well.

Since you're new you might want to invest in some shooting head setups. They're easy to cast and the style is simple enough to pickup since the head lengths aren't too long. Some folks up there are doing fine with RIO Outbound lines and just heavy sinking leaders or long leaders and weighted flies. I'll let them chime in here but word is that is a very successful rig even in winter.

Consider those options before you Skagit up the waters and send the GL fish flying for cover ;-)

-Chris
 

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In the great lakes waters I frequent (mostly the southern shore of lake Erie in OH, PA, and NY) don't really require a sinking tip especially in the early fall or low water situations. My main line is a Rio Midspey - even on bigger water. But I also prefer minimal weight and search out the most aggressive fish. It's like anything else...It's what you like and the angling situation that you are presented with.
 

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Chris,
Don't be so hard on us guys throwing skagit lines. The little fish run when they hit the water but the big strong ones stick around. Furthermore, they always give you the option of beating the fish with the line if it won't take the fly.

In all seriousness, I have been fishing the Skagits for the last two years and have hooked a lot of fish on them. Don't count them out for the GL's. There are a lot of advantages to them. I fished WCs for a long time and the Airflo Skagit does not land with any more of a splash than they do, once you get comfortable with delivering them. They do require a unique technique.

The Rio's crash a bit more, but I still have my Rio lines and use them under certain circumstances.

You should try to find an opportunity to play with the different systems. I'm truly convinced that you can fish with anything from XLT's to Skagit lines. The key is to master how the system works and match it to your waters.

Gillie
 

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Skagits don't crash - bad casting crashes! If you have a 15 foot tip at the end of the skagit or at the end or a WC or Midspey there should be no difference in delivery in the fish's window. A skagit is hard to beat in tight conditions with heavily weighted flies. But they are certainly not needed though still effective when casting lighter flies and even floating tips and long leaders especially in tight quarters.
 

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I live in the great lakes and spent the whole fall season fishing in higher water than normal. I'm going the Scando ( underhand) approach and would highly recommended the Guideline DDC connect shooting head. This line allowed me to hit the depth's that I needed to get fish in high water.This is a tips line with an intermediate belly. It flys like crazy due to the thin intermediate belly and is tuneable for depth from an intermediate to the S4/5 tip. The S4/5 tip on my 9/10 head is basically the equivalent of 15 ft. of T10. No need to mend this line it swings beautiful on its own, however you can do an aerial mend before it hits the water. It's also great in the wind because once again the thin intermediate belly. It also seems to pull out of the water with less noise than one of those fat belly floaters. The ONLY drawback I can see with this line is it would'nt be the ultimate presentation line. I'm actually tired of Skagit lines always being recommended. This is a great option to get deep to fish if you have too. With the lighter sink rate tips on this line and practise you can barely hear the line being pulled thru the water. Also a plug like me can spend a good part of the day throwing 80 ft'ers because this line casts itself.
 

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Rick,
I was being a little sarcastic. Because the skagit lines are thicker and heavier in grain / foot they seem to have acheived that reputation somewhat.

I agree totally with you that once your technique is up to snuff they land with the same sort of impact that most other lines do.

Gillie
 

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Gillie,
My comment was more directed at Chris though I used your analogy of crashing - no reason steelhead should be flying for cover if someone is using a skagit line or any other line

Best regards,
Rick J
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just wanted to thank all of you for your input. I really appreciate it guys. No shops around me to ask these questions too. Have a great winter! The snow is flying here in Michigan...
 

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what will work on the cheap..

For starting out--WC with or without tips is the way to go--- or a homemade skagit for 15 bucks:D I need to check the grn window , but on that LS2 ya just bought I would say you need a 7/8/9 WC...Go plain jane and make your own tips........
 

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Doesn't Willie Gunn have a quip that goes something like "Skagit No-Style" ;-)

I didn't say crash so don't direct that my way. Gillie must still be knocking the rust off :D

I'm referring to the casts which typically go with the line. I just watch Dec's video the other night and found it interesting to note that one of the Skagit pioneers casts nice, smooth, and steady, not much slashing water as in other demonstrations.

That all said, I too have flung the "Yellow Banana" when in tight with large weighted flies, it does work. If you're home water is the Genesee, and it's winter, that'd be the righteous way. If I'm starting out I'd take a more gentle path until my skills were far enough along.

I'm heading down the underhand route and love the Guideline gear. It'll do the job withuot much fuss.

Glad we could be of assistance and disagree and confuse you. Welcome to the club.

-Chris
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Just wondering what you guys think of Scientific Anglers lines? Was curious since nobody recommended them.
 

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my two favs are the rio outbound as it will turn over anything a skagit will with and underhand stroke and much less clunky (sorry but it is true). i just use tips attached to it from clear int. to t-14. my second would be the airflo delta multi tip. very versatile and really all you would need to cover most anything. if you are consistantly casting 70+' i would go with the long delta. my shop has a ton of demos to borrow so send me an e-mail if you want a demo to try. we carry the w/c as well but the delta is the better line imho after using w/c's for years i find the new delta's to be far superior in turning over weight. flame away but anyone will tell you i have spent hundreds of hours testing these things on various rods with various weight tips and flies. try them yourself and tell me waht YOU think.
 

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GL Lines

Its hard to to make recommendations without knowing what rivers you fish and what flies you use and the type of presentation that you are after. But I will try to give you some insight. I started with the RIO WC because thats what everyone else used at the time? After playing around with it I found it to work in most situations. However in the winter ice on the guides etc made stripping the line in a little less enjoyable. I suggest two line types. I have gone almost entirely to the skagit system over that past 3-4 years for 99% of my fishing. The only time I switch is in the winter on specific rivers where I can get away with a mid spey type of line. No stripping of line and keeps the fingers warm and dry. :D
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I will be fishing mainly Michigan's St. Joe river which is bigger than the Manistee or Muskegon Rivers. That AirFlo w/ tips sounds promising. May have to give it a shot.
 

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Sounds like a good choice. I used the Delta alot before the skagits hit the market but then most of my fishing is with fast sink tips and weighted tube flies whcih the skagit does with ease. I really like the DELTA as an all around line though
 

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TheSteelheadBum,

I have to second Black Francis’s recommendation. I have played with the Scagit lines and while they are great tools they have another draw back for fishing the great lakes that no one has yet mentioned. Our winters are a bit harsher than those in the Pacific North-West and icing of the guides can be a real problem at that time. Using Scagit lines requires that you shoot large mounts of running line. The more you have wet line running in and out of the guides the more ice accumulates on those guides. If you use longer bellied lines like the outbound or better yet, the airflo delta multi tip, you are shooting less line and accumulating less ice.

Just my 2 cents.
Charlie.
 
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