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I think it is a really concise, informative article written by someone who has probably spent a lot of time and effort trying to figure out which techniques may be very suitable and effective for our fisheries and for that I applaud the author. It doesn't need to be complex to be useful and informative. Maybe some of you have it all figured out and thus have no use for such an article but I always enjoy listening to what others have to say and their thoughts on a specific technique, especially when they take the time to put it in writing.
 

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Drags are for Sissys
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Nice!

As someone fairly new to spey I find the piece very informative. In fact there is so much there I had to read it a few times to pick everything up. Good reference paper.
 

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too many unanswered questions

Thanks for the tip to the article. Everything helps but as someone totally new to spey I found that it actually didn't say precisely what the advantage of Skagit casting was (can one not cast sink tips with a traditional cast? - I don't know as I haven't tried it yet) and the article didn't actually say HOW to skagit cast, it just made some vague references about the similarity to other casts. (Can you tell that I have just been grading undergraduate papers?).
 

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Released to spawn
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4,348 Posts
Skagit...

Although Ed (Riveraddict) will no doubt correct me on this, it is my understanding that Skagit casting not only originated in the PNW, or at least has been heavily linked in its development, refinement and I may say promotion by the experts of that style in the PNW, it was for generating relatively long casts, with a short heavy head line (usually floating head) and a running line, for situations where there may not be as much room at the back of the caster for the formation of the larger D loop associated with more traditional long headed Spey lines, AND, the heavy head was either designed to, or had a beneficial side effect of being able to turn over a relatively dense leader/sink-tip, to ultimately present light Spey flies (and other larger feathery offerings) at depth to Steelhead in seams a long way off.

From that develpment of the lines, newer specific Skagit rods have appeared, shorter, powerful, and crisper in action compared to the medium action rods used for long belly traditional style Spey casting.

And, to boot, it appears that this method of casting is faster to learn than traditional single/double Spey casting - I certainly hope so, as I have just 6 days @ the Skeena in just over a month's time to get to grips with this wonderful casting style.

Mike
 
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