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Discussion Starter #1
I finally got to do some practicing today. I have a couple questions about how a new Spey caster should pracitce. I have a 12'6" 6wt rod. I've been practicing with between 40' and 50' of line on the grass. (Not including the leader.) I made a grass leader with 20 pieces of 30# stren monofilament. My anchor doesn't seem to be sticking too well on the lawn. I can see it sliding back once I start my forward cast. Any ideas on how to get it to stick better? (I really should be pracitcing on water, but don't always have the opportunity.)

I'm also noticing that I'm getting trailing loops. I'm going to guess that at least some of the reason is because my anchor isn't sticking, but is there more? (Do I need to let the tip of the rod drop some once the forward cast is finished so the trailing loop doesn't form?)

Also I notice that if I stop my forward cast at 11 o'clock, I throw my forward cast up in the air. Am I stopping too early?

If I let the line shoot it will land in a straight line. If I don't let the line shoot the end of the line will collapse in a bunch of squiggles. (Is it getting taut and then springing back in a heap when I don't let the line shoot?)

I guess that's enought for now. :D
 

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geoff:

For grass casting, I continue my search for the perfect lightweight, grass-grabby item to use at the end of the leader. I started with a plastic hair curler; I'm about to try a 12" length of loosely braided 1/2" poly rope.

Beginning casters (usually with singlehand rods) frequently produce the squiggly pileup because of inadequate power in the foreward stroke. Since your casts straighten out when you shoot line, you're probably using plenty of power, and getting bounceback.

I get impressively tight forward loops when I continue the rod's drift closer to eye-level. But when starting to learn, I was told to "aim your forward cast at the treeline." It's been my experience that even forward strokes stopped high allow the line to drop to the water, every time. So I continue to rely on gravity, perhaps the only constant in my casting regimen. :roll:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I discovered a couple things that will help a grass leader grab. First, let the grass grow. I got a bit busy this weekend and didn't cut the grass so it's a bit long. Grabs decent now. (Not as good as water, but better.)

Second, if your practice area is slanted stand down hill from where your anchor is going to land. Just being a foot or two lower than your anchor will help a grass leader grab.

Throw it into the woods. :tsk_tsk: Nothing like trying to pull a 30# test grass leader out of a pine tree. :hihi:

I've been watching my anchor while practicing. I'm finding that it's a bit more useful for me to watch my D loop form than to watch my anchor. At least at this point. As long as I get a nice > shaped D loop I can turn over 60' of line pretty easy.

Actually, I'm surprised at how easy it is to throw that much line. Just a bit of a flick and whoosh it all goes. :D
 

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This discussion cropped up, at the Sandy Speyclave, on the various approaches to building a suitable grass leader. They ranged forn the knot spacing, how many, length of the tags and so on. Someone even mentioned the use of wax to help in grapping the grass. Has anyone tried this and how does it work?
Stan

The road to fly casting excellence is a never ending journey.
 
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