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Can the snowbee 12.6 7/8 throw a grandspey 7/8 line? I am a beginner and cannot throw the full line unless I use unweighted flies and no weights, and even then seldom get a decent cast. Also, I tend to snap off flies. Oh, and I have a round cork indicator. The hardest part is getting all the line into a good d-loop. Also often instead of a good tight loop the line ends up in a pile. The grandspey has a 75 foot head.
 

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Junkyard Spey
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7,114 Posts
In my opinion the 7/8 Snowbee (Tamar) is not suitable for a 7/8 GrandSpey with the whole head out. A look at the optimal grain loading of 370grns printed on the shaft would tell you that. I believe you are grossing overloading that sweet little rod. My favorite lines for this rod are a WC 5/6 or a 350 skagit line. You may quite possibly like something a tad heavier. Maybe a 6/7 Delta Long or only part of your GrandSpey.
 

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Here we go again!
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620 Posts
The shorter the rod, the more difficult it will be to carry long lengths of line. You'll be able to carry that line a whole lot better on a 14 foot rod versus a 12 foot rod. That said, if you shorten up a bit on that line and practice you'll be able to gradually lengthen your amount of line carried until you realize the rods maximum capabillity. Just strip it in to where you're carrying 45 or 50 feet off the tip and practice with that. Smooth everything out before you try to carry a longer amount of line.

Lose the indicator. That line with indicator and beadheads (or whatever heavy flies you're trying to chuck) is not a good match. If anything, tie a small piece of yarn, heavily dressed with floatant, at the line/leader junction and let that be your indicator. Use a shorter leader of Maxima Chameleon (6 feet of 20#, 4 feet of 15#, 2 feet of 12 pound flouro for tippet, this will carry the heavier fly).

A line like the Grandspey will be more suited to swinging flies. If you want a better match for indicator fishing with a spey rod go to a shorter head. The extra line mass (more grains per foot) will carry that mess a lot better than a long belly line, IMHO.

Snapping flies off behind you? Too soon and too forceful on the forward stroke. Aim your D loop higher behind you and allow the leader to land on the water before the line takes off on the forward cast. With a long belly you can (and should) start you forward stroke just before or just as the anchor is landing, but the timing has to allow the anchor to actually land (although briefly, that's the hardest part, the timing) and the forward stroke has to be smooth, don't power it too soon.
 
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