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Fairly new to two handed rods, although I now own a few. So far I have been lining them with recommendations found mostly on Rio and Airflo's charts.

I just bought a used Z Axis 6126 and lined it with the recommended 390 Scandi, and it did not feel very responsive for most of my casts. So without any expectations I cast it today with a 350 Scandi and it seem to come alive, felt much lighter, and overall a more comfortable fit.

Now I'm thinking of trying a 310 Scandi on my 5126 Z Axis. I get that lighter grain weights will feel lighter, but how technically does going lighter impact casting? I'm curious what much more experienced casters have to say.

Thanks,

Mark
 

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I get that lighter grain weights will feel lighter, but how technically does going lighter impact casting? I'm curious what much more experienced casters have to say
As the mass side of the equation is reduced, the velocity side needs to be increased to get the equivalent energy in the cast.

Lighter lines require more speed under control to achieve the same "loading potential" of heavier lines. The key to this is "control", and as speed increases, control tends to decrease, especially in beginning to intermediate casters.

Lighter lines and the lighter (and often more enjoyable) feel associated with them can come at the cost of downrange energy, most notably in difficulty turning over at distance, as lighter lines lose energy at a greater relative rate - start with less, lose it faster.

Learn both extremes (and have fun with it), then go with the weight and feel combo that you like best.
 

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conditions

I find heavier lines less affected by wind, and more able to turn over big flies if technique isn't great. There's no substitute for experience, and there are many variables in finding the magic line for you, the rod, and the situation.
 
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