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Hi there,

For those of you who explore new rivers, do you ever use a GPS to mark your take out? Most of the water I've rowed I knew the river well and have no issues remembering where the take out is. However, when drifting a new river (or new section of a known river), what is your best method for ensuring you don't miss your take out?

Thanks again,
Jesse
 

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I heard they make maps of rivers for your GPS that can pinpoint certain runs and locations or whatever points you want to mark. I was thinking of getting one myself. Rob
 

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Yes, I have a small hand held that I always bring on trips to new water. I have forgot to mark the take out before but it was clear where it was at.
 

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Don't miss your take out!!!

Assuming you have visited and left a vehicle at the take out, just get the co-ords off the gps and put them in as a destination. Never fails, but as your gps could fall in the water, a red ribbon that an be seen from the river might be a good standby.
 

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Did in the one time where I had no clue about the river and missing campsites and take-outs had dire consequences. It was an Arctic canoe trip.

Handheld gps worked like a charm!
 

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I use gps all the time while floating, especially multi-day trips. Moving speed, average speed, time of day, waypoints for good campsites and runs, distance to take-out, land ownership, etc, are all there for you. Routes and floats can be saved (in the track log) for future use. If I had any doubt about seeing the take-out on a new river, I'd waypoint it for sure. Just like waypointing the truck before heading out hiking or hunting in unfamiliar country.

I'd be lost crossing our bay in Alaska without the gps. With the river channel saved as a track, no more getting stuck in the mud waiting for the tide to turn.
 

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Every Time on a New Float

Every time I float a new river or unfamiliar stretch we carry one. We mark the take outs and put ins as well as other info. With some units you can connect to a computer and download other info. You can put in important points like rapids, proposed camping spots, certain landmarks etc without having ever been there. Gives me a bit of peace of mind knowing ahead of time what is coming up.
 

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My initial thought is "why" but several good points have been raised. I float the Deschutes frequently so the only gps I need is beneath my hat, but floating a new river would be a different story. We used them on a Boy Scout canoe trip, but it was more of a novelty. I've been trying to justify one, but so far have talked myself out of it. Might have to reconsier.

Mark
 

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I used to use a Lowrance h2O colour expedition...until I lost it this year. Back in the day it was $500 with the Navionics SD card chip for North America.

Nowadays I would just use a smartphone and download whichever app you want. The very same Navionics chip I bought for $150 back in the day is $16 on the AppStore or Google Play...and 10x better.

I'm using a older Samsung Galaxy S3 exclusively just for the Navionics GPS app. Replaceable battery (or bring spares) and it works just fine without cell tower connectivity once you download the maps using Wifi. Added bonus is that it's a full blown smartphone if you wish to use it for that.

If I were to buy a dedicated handheld GPS now I'd get a Garmin.

What GPS units are you guys using? Been thinking about getting one
 

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Have one in the Jeep and turning on when I start the motor is 'Auto Pilot.'

98% of the time I know exactly where I'm at but have had two occasions where there a 'huge traffic accident' on a back road. Cell phone still had reception but try to tell the 911 lady where you really were? Not a chance in hell.

Pushed that one button, cross bearings right down to the 1/10th mile. :smokin:
 

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Not spey related, but floating and fishing a hatch well into the darkness a GPS can be very handy. Floating in the dark is one thing, not passing the take out can be another.:D
 

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JD
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GPS for Android

OK, since you guys have piqued my interest, I downloaded an app on my phone called Navigator. This app has maps for damn near everywhere in the world. And, since it offers a choice of languages, I assume it will talk to me. I plan to download North America (US & Ca.) once I upgrade my micro SD card. :chuckle: Since the maps are stored on the card, it will only need to access the GPS capabilities of the phone, keeping data usage to a minimum. So, the question is, how do these smartphone apps compare to a dedicated GPS like say, Garmin for instance? I am not so much concerned with using it on the river but on the road.
 

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seaterspey
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For the road I have always had a Garmin! I'm in sales and visit a lot of cities that if I did not have one I would be lost forever.

JD they are easy to use and they tell you where to go! How easy is that!

KC
 

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I have a Garmin Oregon 20? 420? Something like that. Its water proof and small, bought a hunting card that has gmu's and property bounderies with names of property owners . Its some what off of where it shows the blue lines(rivers) but it works. Have about 100 way points between ling cod spots and runs I have found.
 

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JD
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Shortly after I made that comment this morning, I did a search on you tube (I like you tube) and found Garmin makes an app called Navigon for Android devices. It appears do do everything the units for cars will do. So for $39.95 for the app + whatever it's gonna cost me for a micro SD card with enough capacity, ($100 will get me a 128 GB) I'm thinking why not? :cool:

I inherited an older model Tom Tom which I have been using in the car. It's better than nothing, But, everyone I talk to says Garmin is the best. I have been drooling over, lusting for, a replacement for the Tom Tom. Until now, never realized the maps being stored in the device (smart phone in my case) they are not actually downloading data. It is starting to make sense to me that the phone (which I already have) being a very powerful mini computer, I need not purchase yet another dedicated mini computer when (if) all I have to do is install some software enabling the phone to perform the tasks of a full fledged GPS.

Update:I now have a 64GB micro SD card in my phone. I think I paid something like $15 for it a month ago.
512GB Micro SD HC Card with FREE Adapter Class 10 Universal TF Memory Card $7.66 on the auction site
These things are getting cheap!
 

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I use my Garmin cycle computer Edge 800 (it has a lot of functions that are cycling specific and not needed for drifting).

Most of the Garmins can download "Birdseye" which is a google earth overlay. With this program you can see right where you are at any moment from an real life overhead view. You can easily spot landmarks and have a firm idea of what the river ahead and its rapids will look like (may be two year old info--so be careful on rivers that change course a lot).

A GPS is also great to mark locations of hookups for future trips.
 

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FlyWise
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Interesting thread. I work for a mobile app, FlyWise that is targeted specifically at fisherman. Right now it's available on iPhones and we have access to info for all the western states (except AK). Flows, weather, regs, license info and maps are the main features. The mapping feature is something I really want to make valuable. Right now we have a good looking map and we are adding boat ramps, campgrounds, etc. I'd love to hear from you guys if you have any specific ideas about how we can improve the map. The app is free. Give it a look and let me know if you have suggestions and requests.
 

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JD
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Ok

Interesting thread. I work for a mobile app, FlyWise that is targeted specifically at fisherman. Right now it's available on iPhones and we have access to info for all the western states (except AK). Flows, weather, regs, license info and maps are the main features. The mapping feature is something I really want to make valuable. Right now we have a good looking map and we are adding boat ramps, campgrounds, etc. I'd love to hear from you guys if you have any specific ideas about how we can improve the map. The app is free. Give it a look and let me know if you have suggestions and requests.
After drowning my iPhone several years ago, & then discovering you can't just take one of those things apart, soak it in a bag of rice and dry it out, like any other devise, I switched to an Android phone & swore I would never again own an i-anything. So please port your app to Android & I'll be glad to climb aboard.
 
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