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CRACKERS !!!!
Like money in the bank Matt :smokin:
For the past couple years , I've been tying my speys like the one to the right of the Carron , using turkey slips and a bronze mallard roof.
The turkey wing keeps a nice profile on the swing.


Mike
 

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I'd say so. Nice work Matt.
 

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Matt Arciaga
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks everyone, I might put a few more together, smaller I think...
 

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Very nice ties, just curious as a new tier, does it matter which direction tinsel is tied in, I noticed you alternate and some of yours have counterrib, is this to hold the hackle?
 

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Matt Arciaga
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Discussion Starter #12
Very nice ties, just curious as a new tier, does it matter which direction tinsel is tied in, I noticed you alternate and some of yours have counterrib, is this to hold the hackle?
A very good question yes, all my tinsel is countered and OVER the hackle stem. A system that is spelled out since the original creation of the spey fly.

I try to stay as close to William Browns description of the spey fly is.

"Ribbed. – There are invariably three tinsels down the body – a flat, and two threads; one of the threads silver, the other gold (on some patterns these are replaced by coloured silk threads). The flat and one thread is wound round the body in three turns, room being left for the second thread, which is not wound until after the hackle is put on."

Now as the hackle of the Spey fly differs from ordinary hackles, so does the manner of putting it on. The ordinary standard fly has the hackle tied in, or begun, at the small tip or point. The Spey fly has it tied in, or begun, at the butt or thick end of the stem. Having cleaned off the downiest part of the fibre at the butt-end, and left just a little of the gray (as sort of half ‘down,’ half fibre), and having seen that the fibre is long enough to extend about half an inch beyond the bend of the hook – the stem is tied in at the very commencement of the body, along with the tinsels. When the two tinsels – a flat and a thread – have been wound to the right hand, the hackle is taken and wound to the left hand. The tinsel is then wound to the right, parallel with the other two, and across the hackle stem at every turn. When fixed, a needle is required to relieve those fibres of the hackle which may have been tied down by the crossing tinsel.

Credit information to
http://www.feathersfliesandphantoms.co.uk/spey_flies_49.html
 

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Matt Arciaga
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Discussion Starter #15
What may help you is to attempt to turn all the tinsel the same way for instance counter wrap a flat and rope tinsel and wrap the hackle then counter wrap the last rope tinsel, thus, all the tinsel turns being the same and hackle countered. Now this is not the be all end all. Anything can be done with these, i only speak from my personal preference and what works best for me to have good flowing turns of tinsel. think of the shank as a clock, so counter wrap would mean counter clockwise, wrap meaning clock wise. I also use the clock as what hour to tie in my tinsels, say @ 12, 3, 8 or 3, 6, 9 etc...
 
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