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Looking for suggestions on good warm gloves for swinging. I fish in GL cold weather in the winter and its usually not much warmer than 25 degrees. Most warm gloves on the market aren’t great for swinging as your running line slips through on the forward stroke. Any help will be appreciated. Thanks
 

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Hey man, learned this trick from a friend in construction, best setup I have ever used for anything cold weather related.

Get a a couple pair of fingerless wool gloves. I recently uprgraded to the alpaca wool, pretty nice but I’m not certain worth the price upgrade 🤷‍♂️ And get a box of cheap tight fitting jersey liners.

Line your hands with the jerseys and then slide on the wool. Hands stay super warm and yet you have dexterity to use fingers. When fingers finally get wet (reality check here, any glove that allows you dexterity will get wet.....it’s the cold hard truth 🤣) simply swap out liners! If you go all day and get your wool gloves wet, swap those out as well. Easy peasy Japanesey ......and best of all, you can get a 1/2 dozen ragged wool gloves and a dozen jersey liners for the price of one pair of fishing gloves 😄👍
 
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fly fisher 'til it's over
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I'm thinking of XL surgical gloves over thin, warm, wool gloves, or maybe even fingerless wool gloves. Surgical gloves are thin, rubber (waterproof), and although not warm at all, will at least keep water off the other gloves. The rubber surgicals should also hold on to the wet running line better!
 

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For the real cold days I have a pair of Thinsulate fingerless gloves with the flip mitten(wool but just purchased new fleece). Under those I will sometimes use surgical gloves to stay dry. I use those chemical Hot packs. I keep one in my left pocket for swinging and I stick one on the cork to hold during the swing. I use the ones for feet as opposed to hands because they are bigger. They have a peel 'n stick on one side.

I went to the fleece glove from the woven wool for two reasons. one is the velcro to hold the mitten portion back does not like to stay put when sewn on the open weave of the wool. Second, the open weave of the wool likes to catch everything it gets near such as hooks, brush etc. I found both the wool and the fleece will survive a quick dunk and not soak up water too readily.

Dan
 

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For the real cold days I have a pair of Thinsulate fingerless gloves with the flip mitten(wool but just purchased new fleece). Under those I will sometimes use surgical gloves to stay dry. I use those chemical Hot packs. I keep one in my left pocket for swinging and I stick one on the cork to hold during the swing. I use the ones for feet as opposed to hands because they are bigger. They have a peel 'n stick on one side.

I went to the fleece glove from the woven wool for two reasons. one is the velcro to hold the mitten portion back does not like to stay put when sewn on the open weave of the wool. Second, the open weave of the wool likes to catch everything it gets near such as hooks, brush etc. I found both the wool and the fleece will survive a quick dunk and not soak up water too readily.

Dan
Alpaca wool doesn’t 😉
 
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I can +1 attest to the surgical glove trick - these act as a vapor barrier which cuts off the evaporative heat conduction. Under the right environmental conditions this turns out to make a huge difference even without extra “normal” thick insulation which cuts off convective heat loss. They will work over or under - or between - layers. The vapor barrier trick is well know by lightweight backpackers and people living in very cold environments. The classic “bread bags between inner and outer socks” is a well know example.

Just be sure you bring multiple pairs because latex filled with water does the opposite. May be an acquired taste for some people. But they work fantastic entirely out of proportion to both the footprint and the cost. Lifetime supply for $5-10. I got a box of “stylish” black ones - very stealth under my fingerless merino gloves. :)

Gloves are pretty important and get tested to the extreme for spey casting - cold weather, wet environment, and the need for tactile sensitivity while at the same time needing BOTH grippy and slick surfaces depending on the circumstances. Hard to imagine a situation with more contrasting constraints, and trying to figure out a substitute makes you appreciate the fantastic versatility of your actual skin.
 

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Fingerless wool gloves for me. I've got a few pairs both with and without the flap. Haven't needed to add nitrile gloves, but as long as I keep stripping line and casting, Mya hands stay warm enough. Also, a bit of rubber splicing tape on the upper and lower grips gives some extra friction for holding the running line

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

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Ragg wool fingerless gloves

Bought several pair of Fox River ragg wool gloves some time ago. Felting them made the weave tighter and resists water better. I think that this treatment (done in your home) can help you feel warmer. Felting does make gloves smaller but most gloves I have used were too big and loose when I got them. Hope this helps. You can look this up online as to "how to" and I recall that this information also came with the gloves
 

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Alpaca wool doesn’t 😉
Doesn't what Yooper?

Dan
Seems not to catch on stuff like the standard ragged wool. Maybe the brand I got was just a better tighter stitch, But probably not as efficiently as the fleece. I did get a pair of fleece as well, but I still love the wool with jersey liners
 
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I quite like the Guideline Fir-Skin fingerless gloves, but they're not perfect much like regular fingerless wool.

The surgical glove idea sounds like a great trick, if I ever get to go fishing in those GL temps I will try to remember it.
 

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I use these anti slip cotton magic gloves.
I bring a few pairs and swap them when wet. I'll also sometimes cut out the finger tips.
You can get them by the dozen for cheap.
Good idea on the surgical gloves!! Will try that!
When temps are really cold, I'll use a longer line to avoid stripping.
One more tip...
I place a hand warmer on the insides of my wrists and tighten up my cuff straps over.
Thought being that the warmers placed over the wrists where your veins are closest to the skin will warm up the blood a little. Dont know if that's true.
I might be imagining it, but I feel my hands are able to withstand colder temps with the warmers.
 

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I use these anti slip cotton magic gloves.
I bring a few pairs and swap them when wet. I'll also sometimes cut out the finger tips.
You can get them by the dozen for cheap.
Good idea on the surgical gloves!! Will try that!
When temps are really cold, I'll use a longer line to avoid stripping.
One more tip...
I place a hand warmer on the insides of my wrists and tighten up my cuff straps over.
Thought being that the warmers placed over the wrists where your veins are closest to the skin will warm up the blood a little. Dont know if that's true.
I might be imagining it, but I feel my hands are able to withstand colder temps with the warmers.
Cotton is horrible in cold, wet weather as it looses all its insulating ability when wet. The phrase “cotton kills” is often bandied about by outdoor enthusiasts, although you are not of course going to die if just your hands get too cold. Wool is the way to go IMO as it will still maintain a lot of its insulating properties even when wetted through. Synthetics usually fall somewhere in the middle.

But that style - very thin gloves - is certainly the default first thing to try. For me anything more starts to require noticeable compromises in my ability to cast and fish “normally”. Fingerless ones are virtually no impediment at all to casting and fishing, and if they properly fit the fingered thin ones aren’t much worse. I agree about the grippy dots. I had a lot of trouble using my wool ones until I switched. Two of the mains rods I use in winter are Meisers with the default “lacquered” lower grip and when things got a little wet the wool got a bit slippery there without the “grippy dots”. It had also been suggested to me on here to make the dots on the gloves with a glue gun, and that worked great as well.
 
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