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Mr. Mom
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625 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3638476367&category=23818

No, it isn't mine, but at $470 it's a HUGE value to balance your biggest tip heaviest 16ft + rod and hold the biggest grandspey the rio folks have wet dreams about:eek:

You have to get parts from Tibor to convert it to rhw, but it's no big deal. If I hadn't just bought a Perfect and a Raft, it would be mine right now!
 

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Mr. Mom
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625 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Are you implying that the Pate Marlin is not suitable for enormous spey rods? It's a great choice.
 

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Mr. Mom
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625 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Glad to hear it. I'd hate to have to bring up you using a non-ported Abel 4.5N on a 7/8 rod to cast into rearing ponds;)
 

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138 Posts
Big Reel

You guys have got to be joking, so I'll bite. You want to use a reel that holds 650 yards of backing, is as big as a dinner plate (well, at least a salad plate) and was made for tuna and marlin fishing as a spey reel to chase steelies and salmon? Why not just strap a Billy Pate Bone Fish reel on to your Sage 9 wt. and go after mountain brookies? Sure, it might balance large spey rods (like the fabled, but never seen, 21' Greeharts) nicely, but there is a point at which we cross the line from pratical to absurd. My biggest concern would be that you'd be paying for at least 450 yards of backing that you would never even SEE much less need. By the way, a 4 1/4" inch Perfect would balance a large double handed rod nicely, but of course it wouldn't have the braking power of a dump truck...

BFR :whoa:
 

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Mr. Mom
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625 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Hey big-boned-pole, it's no joke. The dimensions on the reel are only 4.5 inches, with an 1.5 to 1.75 inch spool width. Not much bigger than a 4.25 hardy perfect.

Put a 10/11 Grandspey on that reel, and then measure how much backing you got on there. A 7/8 grandspey eats up a HUGE amount of my Hardy 4" perfect (which weighs about 14.5 ounces by the way). On my abel 4.5N the backing is maybe 2 inches across... at most. That's with a 7/8. Pate reels are ridiculously unrealistic in their backing predictions, and I would bet you wouldn't get more than 250 to 300 yards with a 10/11 grandspey. Do you need that much for steelhead? No, but you do need that much to be able to have a decent retrieve rate. The Marlin really is a good choice for big rods and Uber-lines.
 

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Indicators Anonymous
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846 Posts
First of all, backing is cheap, especially when bought in bulk. So if I have 400 yards of backing, most of which never gets used, I dont think twice about it.

Secondly, big heavy reels do something really well-balance out big heavy rods. Take for instance, the Winston DBF 7/8-a heavy rod with alot of its weight in the tip. When I purchased the rod, I was in search of one heavy ass reel to balance out the rod.

I had my eyes on the Loop Evotec 11-14 HD but the bugger was just too light so I turned around and purchased an Abel non-ported Big Game 4.5N. The reel just barely bounces out the rod and carries more backing then I will ever need (with an Accelerator) but it will also double as a great offshore reel as well. :devil:
 

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138 Posts
OK. You convinced me. You really do need a heavy reel to balance out these heavier rods. But, since you guys are on the big rod-big -reel-heavy line kick, I have got a proposal I've been kicking around in my head for some time now. There's this grist mill just north of where I live. Also, I've got this new--in--dirt (NID) utility pole in my front yard. Here's what I'm thinking about doing, let me know what you think: Let's "borrow" the water wheel from that grist mill, dig out the utility pole (you guys provide the back hoe since this is my idea) and strap the grist mill wheel to the pole. Since the wheel is pretty big I thought we could use about three miles of bailing twine as backing and then about another hundred yards of a special hybrid line composed of 300 pound Dacron as the runnning portion, nylon rock climbing rope as the head (I'm thinking a 300 foot head should be sufficient) and very thin cable as tip sections. Is this outfit a tad heavy? Sure. But think about it for a second: You would absolutely OWN a river like the Columbia or Amazon and the rig would double as an off-shore set up for whale sharks and really any marine mammal you can name.

Are we in?

:smokin:

BFR
 

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JD
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3,609 Posts
balancing

thirty feet of lead core wrapped around the arbore does wonders on light weight reels.
 

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Mr. Mom
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625 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
bigfatrod said:
You would absolutely OWN a river like the Columbia or Amazon :smokin:

BFR
The average 10 year old on the amazon would put 97.25% of the fishers on the board to shame if we went head to head on the deschutes with us using our favorite rig, and them using 20 yards of 100lb test wrapped around a coke bottle... :eyecrazy:
 

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Mr. Jones--

Genious idea with the lead core line! Now we're getting some where...

BFR
 

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Pullin' Thread
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4,694 Posts
JD,

Although the lead core on the arbor works well to add weight, it does not increase the capacity of the light reels; thus, it doesn't help if you have a need to put a 10/11 GrandSpey or XLT on a reel and have 150 or so yards of backing to go with the line. To do this, you need a big capacity reel.
 

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JD
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3,609 Posts
you need a big capacity reel

Yeah right! But a Billy Pate Marlin. Gimme a break.
 

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Mr. Mom
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625 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
What is it with you Guys!!!! You have what open minded folks like to call "blinders" on when it comes to reels. Notice I didn't say " WE open minded folks" because I am not of that tribe either, but my ancestors must have intermingled with them because I am apparently ahead of you. Either that, or you have never fished, or even held a Pate in your hand and you are speaking out of ignorance and preconceived notions. Let me educate you.

What about a Marlin is out of line? It has a diameter that is a quarter inch LESS than a ULA Force 4. An eigth less than the Loop HD. It is narrower than both. Those may be the two most popular "expense is no object" big reels out there for spey. So clearly the size isn't a problem, right?

The Pate is overkill for steelhead? Comparing the technical complexity of the drag on a UlA Force (which has had it's problems) and the Loop HD (which WILL have it's problems, all reels do) to a Pate is like comparing a formula one racer to a saturn station wagon. Which one do you want to count on day in and day out? Oh, and the Pate's biggest problems? Weight and difficulty of changing spools. In this instance the weight is an asset, and with a big grandspey cut for tips, spool changes are irrelevant. So clearly the Pate is not a problem because it is overkill for Steelhead.

It has a MUCH larger capacity than either of them. This is something I like to think of as a good thing.

I repeat my earlier question: what SPECIFICALLY makes a Pate Marlin a bad choice for big spey rods.

Oh, and Big Fat Rod. Wrapping lead core is not genius. It's an act of desperation used by someone who has finally admitted that they chose a reel that is too light for their rod. If only there were a heavier reel out there... You might as well epoxy quarters to your reel. At least then you aren't giving up backing capacity. Having a hollow rod butt with screw in weights to balance the rod with different reels. That's genius :razz: Custom rod builders can either acknowledge me when they use the idea, or better yet, just send cash baby!
 

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E-A-S-Y Philster! Nobody is saying you CAN't use an offshore reel meant for 200+ pound fish that swim upwards of 40mph to go after 5-30 pound steelies/salmon. If you feel you must, then by all means, be my guest. Of course, you can also use a Greyhound bus to transport a family of three. Hey, it's got plenty of capacity, the diesel engine will run forever trouble-free and it's built very sturdy like, well, like a bus.

One big positive I CAN see with the BP Marlin reel: you can crank the drag down so tight on that bad boy that when that 8lb. hatchery buck turns after slamming your fly that little bastard will either be in immediate need of a fish chiroprator (pescapractor?) or be instantly decapitated.

So if your landing skills are sub-par, I guess that big reel with its 747-stopping drag might be just the ticket...

BFR :D
 

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#&%*@^# Caster
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3,058 Posts
Still never understood the whole need to balance a spey rod. I use light reels and bigger rods and have never had a problem. Maybe it is because I know what the inside of a gym looks like:razz:

Seriously the Pate is not a bad choice for its backing capacity. That is all we need these big reels for anyway. I just hate the hassle of changing spools which is why I like the Ross BG.
Hell, ALL the reels we use are overkill for a steelhead. All you need is a light enough drag to prevent overrun.

But if I ever go sailfishing I will have a reel for it!

-sean
 

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Mr. Mom
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625 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Even though you don't deserve any further reply BFR I will put it in terms even you can understand. You won't of course, but that's your problem

1. 250 yards of backing is perfect on a standard arbor reel to give you a fast retrieve ratio for steelhead. That's about what you'd get on a Marlin with a 10/11 grandspey with room for sloppy winding.

2. For parody to be funny, there has to be a grain of truth in it. Your "comedic stylings" of ridiculous exageration would be a hit with the high school crowd but are pretty infantile. "Chicken!!! if you're gonna eat things with two feet you might as well eat babies!" yeah... real funny.

3. Any day you want to compare fish playing ability, I'll meet you in Baja for a little bluewater action. I generally use 13.2 pound rio IGFA for everything but billfish and sierra mackerel. drag setting of around 4 pounds.

Since you can't hold a rational debate on this subject, and give me specifics on what is wrong with the reel, I have to assume you either know you're wrong and can't admit it, or you don't have the... shall we say... firepower.

Keep them jokes coming
 

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Mr. Mom
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625 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
sean said:
Still never understood the whole need to balance a spey rod. I use light reels and bigger rods and have never had a problem. Maybe it is because I know what the inside of a gym looks like:razz:


But if I ever go sailfishing I will have a reel for it!

-sean
Sean

I agree with the balance issue... To a point. Up to 15 feet I also don't worry about balance. Beyond 15 feet, a tip heavy rod makes for a LONG day. Gym, I don't need no stinkin' gym. I have toddlers :eyecrazy:

And yes you are correct, having a reel you can use for heavy saltwater is handy. With the currently available under $200, 4 and 6 piece saltwater capable rods, a family trip to cancun, Cabo, or any other tropical destination can very easily have at least a half day of bluewater or reef fishing worked into it. You already have the most expensive piece of equipment you'll need :D
 

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Philter's knickers in a bunch?

Philster,

BFR: (translation) "It just seems that the BP Marlin reel is a bit overkill for salmon/steelhead fishing."

Philster: (translation) "Oh, yeah, well...well...my T&T 1307 can beat up your Sage 9136!"

Double-Fister, listen to yourself. Your obvious frustration and personal attacks can only mean one thing: you have run out of ideas. Challenging me to "meet you in Baja" is a beauty! Please tell me you're still in high school and play Dungeons and Dragons--I'm starting to get concerned. With your recent comments, you are dead-center in the middle of the packed-to-capacity spey-pages arena, the lights are bright, and everyone in the stadium is laughing---at you. Including myself. Strong work.

Now, if you'll excuse me, I need to go hook up my down rigger--I've got some brookies to catch.:chuckle:

BFR
 
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