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I'm wanting to get into one hand casting using two rods I have. 4100-3 and 589-4. I pretty much only fish trout using subsurface tactics and dry/emergers when fish are rising.

I've been reading as much as I can but still find all the information confusing, so I hope to garner some more definitive answers and suggestions.

I'm trying to understand if Scandi or Skagit would be better. I'm in Boise and don't travel much beyond my home waters (Owyhee, Boise Main and South, Payette). I'd like to be able to fish subsurface then switch to dry/emerger if a hatch comes on. If I understand correctly Scandi is generally better for lighter flies and top surface work whereas Skagit can throw the heavy stuff best?

OPST I noticed sells everything to do all of this, but that is a big chunk of change to just try it out.

Any suggestions on a poor man set up to try before I buy? Upline by 3 with a DT? Can I use a non-tapered furled leader to make a floating head to add leader to?

Whatever wisdom any of you choose to impart will be much appreciated!

Todd
 

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I’d recommend as the poor mans path just using the line that you have now. The next step for grace and versatility get a Rio single hand spey line which is a lightly modified trout taper that makes it a bit easier for spey casts while at the same time remaining a wonderful dry fly line. Also comes in an intermediate head version, so you are covered there as well if you end up really liking it. If you are serious about learning all the ins and outs of sh spey casting then the only real comprehensive presentation I know of at present is Simon Gawesworths “single hand spey casting” book. Possibly some of Jeff Putnam’s videos. But can’t say enough about Simon’s sh book.

I agree with MHC, the micro skagit stuff is a whole other breed. The more universal approach, especially if you already fish a conventional Sh rod is to build on that.

As far as overlining, I personally prefer overlining the Rio sh spey (already rated for sh rods) by one, but not necessary. YMMV. If you use a spey rated head then DROP 2 or 3 wts, or just use the grs to go up a wt or so from the regular overhead line weight.
 

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Double taper for single handed trout. Forget the Skagits,OPST and their ilk, too clunky and splashy, keep it easy, sweet and traditional.
Malcolm
Agreed. I love a good 3wt glass with a DT line for small stream work. Roll casts like a dream, but can still shoot a good line if your back isn't against the brush.
 

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i agree with malcolm regarding the opst being clunky . it certainly isn't a dry fly line . but with a long leader and thoughtful casting it ain't all that bad . plenty of fish say so , trouts smallies , steelhead . wet flies are fine and it's great for streamers and poppers .i skate flies with it as well .
my test cast of the sa scandi lite single hand line revealed it to be more delicate than the opst . i was swinging an emerger with it when i test cast it and caught a decent brownie !, so it must be good . (-: . haven't ponied up the money for one yet though .
i have a rio sh line as well but i find i don't use it as much . for me casting it is a bit more difficult( likely operator error ) and it is somewhat less utilitarian for the fishing i do . of course i should say i don't do a whole lot of dry fly fishing . perhaps over-lining with the rio , as botsari says , would be more to my liking . i think you might like the sa line . it all depends....
i'm embarrassed to admit i have 0 experience with a dt .
thanks , jim
 

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What I'll suggest is not meant to be a self promotion however I made the video for a reason...…….. If you Google 'Streamer Fishing Techniques by Ard Stetts' you'll find a video about subsurface fishing and rigging.

I developed my ways long before I ever touched a Spey rod and can witness that they are very effective for trout fishing with a 9 foot 5 weight rod. I did use a WF line and instead of the 4 foot sink sections you'll see in the video I used 3 foot pieces of an old full sinking line. For 9 foot rods I use 4 foot of 25 pound mono for a leader butt - 3 foot of Z-9 and a 2 foot tippet heavy enough to handle the fishing.

The leader thing may make more sense after you see the youtube video. The mending will make sense regardless of rod or line weight I would hope.

The video was made as an aid I could refer people to who were planning on coming here fishing. Many folks had arrived without a good grasp of how they may have to fish to be successful. You'll see that it was a pretty impromptu thing when done.

Ard
 

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https://raspberr3yfisher.wordpress.com/2018/12/03/switch-lines-my-survey/

Doing the same thing, but for my Green 10' 7wt fiberglass. I decided I wanted a long front taper with a short body to shoot. So I compared my desired profile to lines from Airflo, Guideline, RIO, Nextcast, et cetera.

I am going with the Airflo Switch, but hey, I blogged each profile to help me, and maybe it will help you too. You may want a longer body.
 

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If you enjoy fishing choppy runs in the colder early hours the microskagit-streamer approach is worth exploring. I started out with a poor man's skagit made from a line off of ebay years ago for $15-20 I think. I've since picked up an OPST/Lazar line setup and a Rio Skagit Trout Max. They are phenomenal heads however I find I keep going back to my homebrewed integrated line. I would say the mono-loop-tapered-head setup is optimized for longer distances than I usually am fishing. Even on bigger rivers I tend to break the water down into small sections and work those with shorter casts whenever possible. The pvc integrated running line may not shoot well but its so much nicer to handle, especially in the cold.

I do carry a spare reel with a traditional floater for dries, wets, nymphs, strip-retrieving streamers all that good stuff. The microskagit is a dedicated setup for the right conditions, but I tend to look for those conditions more and more and as a result I use it a ton.

Last month I made this 6 min video trying to illustrate for some new-to-spey friends what I mean when I say I was 'swinging streamers with a tip'. As Ard and others have mentioned it's a challenge to communicate some of this stuff in text so after some ridiculously long emails I thought why not take a recent session on the home river and add some captions.

rod: Redington Classic Trout 9' 6wt

line: Orvis Wonderline Generation 3 Spey WF11F
chopped the head ~ 13' from running line
(needle-nail-knot 30lb mono with perfection loop to end for sinktip)
long rear taper, no front taper ~225 grains

sinktip: 6' of Rio 9wt type 3 (tapered)

leader: Maxima Ultragreen
6" of 12lb - bloodknot - 2' of 8lb

fly: Spunny Bunny (posted a recipe for this fly in Hooks and Feathers a while back)

 
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If you enjoy fishing choppy runs in the colder early hours the microskagit-streamer approach is worth exploring. I started out with a poor man's skagit made from a line off of ebay years ago for $15-20 I think. I've since picked up an OPST/Lazar line setup and a Rio Skagit Trout Max. ....
First great video and notes, and i believe this is instructional and helpful,\.

I am believing in a traditional slow fibreglass rod the OPST weight is too aggressive, so this is why I m backing off to to a longer (Scandi like) taper. But this is is also dependent on rod, preference and what you want to accomplish.

Thank you for sharing
 
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