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So we are planning to fish the Guala River of Norway next year in June. I have about a year time to prepare. What gears are needed for those who have fished there?

I did a quick research and the online articles suggest spey rods of 9/10wt, 14~15ft. Big guns! While a friend of mine recently caught his first Salmon there on a 7130.

Currently my heaviest spey rod is the TCX 7126. Do you think I m undergunned and better get another 9140 or 10150 outfit? I won't have much uses for such big gun locally so it's probably only for the trip (or future trips if I decide to visit there again!)

As for the reel and line....drag or click pawl reel? Skagit, Scandi or traditional longer belly line?

Thanks
 

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While that 7126 will handle the average fish, I tend to use gear for the exception. As in there are some truly giant salmon in that river and would use nothing less than a 9wt with a good/ stout disk drag reel. Nothing worse than overplaying a fish you intend to release, there is 40# + fish landed there every year. The rest, fish how you like but scandi is most common but it is a big river and long cast are helpfull in some runs. How you deliver the fly is open to all interpretations.
 

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The Skeena in the fall
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Big river big fish means big gear. Why go to the expense of traveling to a special river, be fortunate enough to hook a large fish, then destroy the fish because you used small fish gear. Respect the fish and the river you’re fishing.
 

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I have that same rod 7126 TCX and have it paired with a Bogdan Model 2. I have landed Chinook up to 35 lbs and Atlantic Salmon to 20lbs with this setup with no problems. I think you would be fine with this rod as long as you have a good reel with a good drag to use with it.
 

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Go prepared!
Depending on the beat you are planning to fish. Seek advice from the owner or outfitter of the beat/s.
Beats on the lower stretches of the river, early season: 14/15/16 ft rods in 9-10-11-12 wt. Big discdrag reel with a selection of full sink lines. Scandi is the norm.
Upper part of river late season: 12-13/14/15 ft in 8-9-10 wt. A versitip floater + a few full sinkers.
As pointed out by the others, Big river Big fish Big guns.
Best of luck!
-Sigurd
 

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I have that same rod 7126 TCX and have it paired with a Bogdan Model 2. I have landed Chinook up to 35 lbs and Atlantic Salmon to 20lbs with this setup with no problems. I think you would be fine with this rod as long as you have a good reel with a good drag to use with it.
Depending on the water, you could probably use the TCX 7126 to kill Atlantic salmon larger than 15 kg..... but the problem with northern Norwegian mainstems as I understand it, is that they are large, narrow and fast. A stouter rod might be in order.
 

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I think for fish fighting and 8/9 weight it probably ok even in some of the faster runs, but i found i used my 10/11 rods most in medium/high flows cause the heavier lines made casting big heavy flies easier.

You dont see many guys with plain clicker reels on that river.
 

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I have that same rod 7126 TCX and have it paired with a Bogdan Model 2. I have landed Chinook up to 35 lbs and Atlantic Salmon to 20lbs with this setup with no problems. I think you would be fine with this rod as long as you have a good reel with a good drag to use with it.
I don't agree anyone should be using a 7 weight rod when there is a chance of fish in the 40 pound range. Or less.
Simply not a good idea. My 2 cents.
 

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The Skeena in the fall
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I have that same rod 7126 TCX and have it paired with a Bogdan Model 2. I have landed Chinook up to 35 lbs and Atlantic Salmon to 20lbs with this setup with no problems. I think you would be fine with this rod as long as you have a good reel with a good drag to use with it.
I’m certainly not saying it’s impossible to quickly land and release a 35 lb Chinook with a 7 wt 12’6” rod, as you have done it.
However in my experience a 35 lb Chinook heading downstream in a strong current is going to overpower that 7 wt. rod in a heartbeat.
Sure you can play the fish on the reel drag but the rod will be next to useless in helping to bring the fish in quickly.
Almost guaranteed a large salmon on a small rod will have fatal lactic acid buildup and die.
Why risk that at a time when fish numbers are dropping so much?
 

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I was there for the opening (June 1), in principle at the beginning of the season there is plenty of water and cold so big flies and lines S7 / 8! a minimum of 14 'is recommended; it is not the size of the fish that is involved but the ease of fishing in this configuration.
Then the lighter rods are perfect for fine peaches.
 

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Living approximately 40min from Gaula river.

I am not expert to say what you should use there but everything depends how much there’s water.

If its 200-400 cubics you might have some troubles with #7 rod.
Under 100cubs and you can easily go with heavier single hand , switch rod or some shorter spey rod.

Last year I was mostly fishing there with single hand #8 rod when the water level was low, didn’t caught any huge ones but 10kg landed and released with single hand pretty quickly.

I was just fishing upper Gaula with single hand when water level was quite normal, no problems there where river is not so wide.

But let’s say :
14-15footer for high water conditions & S4-S6+ sink lines /tips
Low water conditions 11-13ft /single hand #7-9 ,Float, intermediate, S1/S2/S3 heads/tips
 

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I’m certainly not saying it’s impossible to quickly land and release a 35 lb Chinook with a 7 wt 12’6” rod, as you have done it.
However in my experience a 35 lb Chinook heading downstream in a strong current is going to overpower that 7 wt. rod in a heartbeat.
......

Let's not get carried away here. A little historical perspective if I may.

Once upon a time, some of us used saltwater 9 weight and 10 weight single handers to fish Chinook.

Believe me, the TCX 7126 (really an 8 wt, not a 7 wt) has just as much lifting power as those 9 and 10 weight saltwater single handers. If not more.

Besides it is slightly easier to run at top speed on cobble bars with a lighter rod!
 

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The Skeena in the fall
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Let's not get carried away here. A little historical perspective if I may.
Once upon a time, some of us used saltwater 9 weight and 10 weight single handers to fish Chinook.
Believe me, the TCX 7126 (really an 8 wt, not a 7 wt) has just as much lifting power as those 9 and 10 weight saltwater single handers. If not more.
Besides it is slightly easier to run at top speed on cobble bars with a lighter rod!
Yes let's add some historical perspective.

Back when the world fly fished for big fish in rivers with single handed rods there was lots of fish in the rivers, you could kill fish, and few worried about how long it took to land a fish, particularly if you were going to kill it.
So a big Chinook on an fly rod was all about the size of the fish and length of the fight.

Those days are gone.

Today it's about being fortunate enough to fish in a river that holds fish, being fortunate enough to catch one, and having the equipment to land it quickly and safely so it can have a good chance of recovering and spawning.

The least we can do is make sure our equipment is up to meeting the demands of today's fishing realities
 

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JD
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You have a year to acquire the proper tools for the trip. Put the feelers out, set up searches. Buy a used rod & reel & if need be, spring for a new line & backing. When you no longer need it, unload it for what you can get out of it.
 

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''Speydo-masochist''
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I've only fished the Gaula once (for 3 days), this was on the Storren area.
It's a pretty large & fast paced river with some deep, but still fast flowing, pools.
The thing to remember is that the fish could be anywhere across the river depending on where there are large boulders etc. to form fish holding lies; even if they are holding close to the bank you must remember that the river has 2 banks - so if you can cover it whilst still casting at a suitable downstream angle so the fly does fish too quickly, then you are maximising your' chances of a take.

Couple this with the need to fish fast sinking lines in early season & I would suggest that you make life as easy as you can for yourself & get an outfit of at least a 14 ft 9/10 weight, longer & heavier if you wish.

If conditions (& where you are fishing on the river) allow you to use a shorter and lighter outfit, then fine. But remember the old adage:
"It's better to have what you don't need, than to need what you don't have!".

Bearing in mind the full cost of the trip, it would be false economy to me for you not to go fully equipped.

Enjoy the trip though - & tight lines whatever outfit you choose.

Regards, Tyke.
PS, I'm fishing the Lower Tay in September & I'll be fishing with 2 Bruce & Walkers, a 16 ft 9/10 Norway Speycaster & a 16 ft 11 wt Powerlite Speycaster - & these are shorter & lighter outfits than many of the regular local anglers will be using (I'll be fishing with Yorkie & he like them will be swinging a 17 ft 11/13 wt Guideline LPXe - it throws a big fast sinker a long way & that is what is needed if the river is carrying a foot or two of extra water). No one chooses these outfits for the fun of it, they are simply the best tool for a specific job, so that's what they use. T.
 

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Norwegian Fishing Club

I fished the Gaula last year at the Norwegian Fishing club. I used a 15 ft Sage X that was a camp rod. I did have a 700 rain Nexty Zone to put on it. I would bet that if you are at a lodge they would love to help you with gear.


Ken DaytonSeattle
 

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There's a video on you tube of an American guy fishing Alta with a single hander, he hooks(for the life of me I don't know how!) a really big fish 30lb+, of which he has no control over and which eventually drags him downstream so far they have to boat after it, disrupting other anglers in their fishing along the way.Long n short, the fish is played to a stand still and to its death.He's pleased as punch with himself, after many minutes of his own running commentary on the video.
If you can guess I don't approve, the guy obviously has more money than sense(has to to get near the Alta!) and of sense there's precious little.
Set yourself with the right tools for the job.You won't beat the longer, stronger rods for the water command they give you, the ease of casting, the longer line you'll lift and control and the control you have over a hooked fish.
Convince yourselves all you like about the "sporting ethic" of light tackle fishing!, indeed there's a time n place for it no doubt of that!, but Scandi land is not one of those places!.
I once fished Tweed one Autumn with an American Angler, great chap, good company and a good laugh in the hut.He had his 9 weight single hander and swore blind he'd be fine and would match us all for fishing.Sadly he was a long long way wrong.He couldn't get a line out for the restricted casting space, when it did go it was at great personal physical effort and disturbed the water way too much.
He watched me fishing my 15fter and wet 2 Spey line and swore rather loudly and descriptively when I cast twice his distance with just the one cast, hit the spots and at the right depth.
For you this is a big trip, long way to go to fail or be out gunned, or littering the bankside with "only if's".Take the very good advice offered and equip yourself effectively, no mucking about,15ft Lpxe and a selection of Guideline heads to match.You'll also need a few tapered leaders with at least 25lb or better 30lb point, don't ignore the intermediate approach and don't over wade, Gaula fish will run shallow quite close to the bank at times.Oh and the Skagit?, leave that at home holding up the washing.
Wishing you the best of success and a real good time,Yorkie.
 

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There is plenty of equipment in classifieds that should work great for you trip and not cost you much. I see two different B&W rods that would be ideal (one from me).

A trip like that is worth preparing and practicing for, if your time allows. I feel that the prep and practice are some of the most enjoyable parts of fishing adventures.
 
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