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Discussion Starter #1
I didn't see a thread comparing the two versions, so I thought I'd start one:

I'm in the process of testing the 54' and the 63' Equalizer side-by-side.
The lightest version of the 63- is the 7/8 which is 662 grains and is pushing the grain window on my Meiser (450-750gr.) by the time I add a poly leader.

I do prefer the 63'. In tight quarters, I can just bring in some of the head (not too much since you need enough mass for turnover), but enough to turn the 63' into the 54'.
I have been using both pairings with the integrated line. I have no doubt that a thinner diameter running line would allow me to cast further, but the integrated running line is very smooth and if I do want to bring the head in a bit to modify my casting (due to tight bank or smaller bucket), than it's nice to have one integrated system with no possibility of knots getting hung up in the guides.

I do have a question for Bruce or others familiar with the line...

I notice that 63' has a two tone color transition (going from yellow, to green, and finally to the orange running line), whereas the 54' just has the yellow transitioning to the orange. I am curious as to the difference?
For those using the line, where is your holding point. I tend to hold somewhere in the "green" transition on the 63'.

A few additional thoughts:

1. Without any cutback on the tip, the line will throw the heaviest polys.
2. I presume, with a bit cut back, one could have an all around line, similar to the original Delta, capable of throwing weighted sink tips in excess of 110 grains. (I threw the heaviest versileader which is in excess of 100 grains and it casted very well. I even used a weighted tube just for practice and line testing. It performed very well and when moving to a lighter fly and poly leader, it REALLY flew.
3. I like my Deltas, but the Gaelforce seems to aid in better turnover and more powerful casts with better delivery.
4. The Gaeforce throws Lazer-tight loops which requires me to be extra careful to not get my leader hung up in line during the cast.
5. The far bank doesn't seem all that far anymore. :grin2:

Poppy's line demo program is excellent. I can't recommend the Red Shed Fly Shop enough. He and Dale are as nice as they come and they're even wise enough to send a handy tool to wind the line back-up.
 
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Aha!
Typo in the subject. I couldn't believe that one company would have lines with only a foot difference in length!
 

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If you want to understand where the difference between Spey lines comes after obvious head length and weight measures the weight difference between rear and front half has huge effect. Coiling both halfs and weighing them on a cup is possible to do very accurately after some practice holding the rest of the line horizontal six inches away in hand so that length mark comes three inches out of cup rim. Thick line sections can be so stiff that you can change scale reading either pushing down or lifting up but watching the reading it is possible to "null" this effect.

When Spey line/head has 70% of its weight on rear half it is very easy and efficient to Spey cast but there also comes difficulties to make the line loop straighten when casting to head wind.

Esa
 

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Have you weighed and measured the Gaelforce line? Just to see what you're actually casting. By comparison with an Airflo - an Equalizer 63 weighs as much as an 8/9 or 9/10 Delta Long...


The Delta Long 7/8 are under 600 grain. I have three - the heaviest is 585 grain 63 feet or IOW an AFFTA standard 8 weight mid belly.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the responses. I've asked a moderator to fix the title.

I did not weigh the Gaelforce, but I do expect them to be accurate as advertised - 660 grains or so. I really prefer the loading of the original Delta 7/8 or the Delta2 8/9 off my rod (HC 15' 6/7/8). Not because I like these lines better, but because of their lower grain weight. Both 7/8 and 8/9 Deltas are less than 600 grains so the 63' Equalizer is heavier by a meaningful margin. The Deltas can be casted slow or fast -- into the cork or off the tip - whatever I prefer.

However, when fishing a 15' rod, I find the Deltas to be too short for my liking. The 63' Equalizer, in the 7/8 series, is the lightest grain weight made at that length. If they made one just under 600 grains, I'd probably own 3 of them to share with friends! The Meiser has a very forgiving grain window and I've been using two-handed rods for many years. I feel like I understand the nuances of a cast when fishing a heavier line.
My timing and mechanics on the Gaelforce, simply because their length and grain window, require me to be more precise. But I'm okay with that. I think it's making me a better caster. The Gaelforce lines are excellent CASTING and FISHING lines. Yesterday, I spent some time in heavy winds and they still performed well - even using the lighter grain weight.
 

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I didn't see a thread comparing the two versions, so I thought I'd start one:
I do have a question for Bruce or others familiar with the line...

I notice that 63' has a two tone color transition (going from yellow, to green, and finally to the orange running line), whereas the 54' just has the yellow transitioning to the orange. I am curious as to the difference?
For those using the line, where is your holding point. I tend to hold somewhere in the "green" transition on the 63'.
Hi,

I have done some measurements with my Gaelforce 63' 8/9 (708 grain) line. The yellow part is about 56-57' with an weight around 670 grains, Having the yellow part around the rod tip is my sweet spot (+- 50 cm) on the rod Meiser MKS 15' 7/8 (500-850) I use. The back taper starts about 2 meters before color change to green and continues about 3 meters after it. Observe I only used my eyes looking for the back taper..

Have fun casting/fishing the Gaelforce lines.. ;)
 

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Thanks for the responses. I've asked a moderator to fix the title.

I did not weigh the Gaelforce, but I do expect them to be accurate as advertised - 660 grains or so. I really prefer the loading of the original Delta 7/8 or the Delta2 8/9 off my rod (HC 15' 6/7/8). Not because I like these lines better, but because of their lower grain weight. Both 7/8 and 8/9 Deltas are less than 600 grains so the 63' Equalizer is heavier by a meaningful margin. The Deltas can be casted slow or fast -- into the cork or off the tip - whatever I prefer.

However, when fishing a 15' rod, I find the Deltas to be too short for my liking. The 63' Equalizer, in the 7/8 series, is the lightest grain weight made at that length. If they made one just under 600 grains, I'd probably own 3 of them to share with friends! The Meiser has a very forgiving grain window and I've been using two-handed rods for many years. I feel like I understand the nuances of a cast when fishing a heavier line.
My timing and mechanics on the Gaelforce, simply because their length and grain window, require me to be more precise. But I'm okay with that. I think it's making me a better caster. The Gaelforce lines are excellent CASTING and FISHING lines. Yesterday, I spent some time in heavy winds and they still performed well - even using the lighter grain weight.
On the other hand - I find that lining a rod with a lighter lines requires a better technique, and heavier lines are easier to cast: Technique trumping equipment. The Gaelforce is more comparable to a Delta Long and heavier by comparison. Perhaps that is the reason they seem easier to cast?

I would assume fly casting and fly fishing as one in the same. How about you?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
On the other hand - I find that lining a rod with a lighter lines requires a better technique, and heavier lines are easier to cast: Technique trumping equipment. The Gaelforce is more comparable to a Delta Long and heavier by comparison. Perhaps that is the reason they seem easier to cast?

I would assume fly casting and fly fishing as one in the same. How about you?

Good conversations. I agree that heavier lines, in general, are easier to cast because of how the line loads the rod. However, in my particular scenario, the upper end of my rod's grain window is 750. If the Gaelforce 7/8 63' weighs 660 grains and I put a 100+ grain poly off of that, plus a fly, it's in the cork and then some! In my situation, this is why I find it more challenging to cast the Gaelforce in comparison to a lighter line. The rod, with the right timing and mechanics is completely capable. But for me, the timing is more critical because of the total payload.

In my experience, some lines have been really fun to cast, but because of the lack of line control or how the line behaves on the water, I haven't felt that they are great "fishing" lines. For example, one line might deliver long casts very efficiently, but mends poorly, doesn't ride well on the water's surface, or tracks poorly. Or it doesn't perform well in windy conditions. Or it can only deliver a smallish fly. With the Gaelforce line, I feel that it casts and fishes very well - excellent long casting, mending capability, and will deliver big irons on long leaders or poly's with no modification to the line (cutback, etc.). Just my opinion.
 

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I would add something to this thread if I could but you pretty much nailed all of the good stuff Read1t48 :)
I guess the only thing is that if you are using the full line as in not cut into a head try pulling the color change (bright green head part) three inches into the tip top for the super sweet spot ;)
 
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Discussion Starter #11
I would add something to this thread if I could but you pretty much nailed all of the good stuff Read1t48 :)
I guess the only thing is that if you are using the full line as in not cut into a head try pulling the color change (bright green head part) three inches into the tip top for the super sweet spot ;)
That's exactly what I've been doing. But the neighbor on the far side of the river is tired of climbing his ladder to take my fly out of his bushes. And the year round kayakers are hogging his bank to watch mesmerizing casts :grin2:

The fish, likely directly below my feet, are also happy. Oh well. To each his own.
 

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That's exactly what I've been doing. But the neighbor on the far side of the river is tired of climbing his ladder to take my fly out of his bushes. And the year round kayakers are hogging his bank to watch mesmerizing casts :grin2:

The fish, likely directly below my feet, are also happy. Oh well. To each his own.
The ones below your feet are easy just have the patience to let it swing all the way in :wink2:
 

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Thanks for posting this thread my friend :):)
I have a couple 54ft and 63ft now to try out on my 13ft and 14ft rods ... I'm excited :D:D


Mike
Mike hurry up I’m interested in knowing what you think haha0:)
 

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Well first of all, I have to fight off the urge of using those 15M Extended Spey Heads :hihi::hihi:
One of the rods lined up for testing is my self re-finished 13ft Sharpes Scottie spliced joint :smokin::smokin:


Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Dang you, Mike! Tell me... you're pairing the Sharpes with a new Olson?
Hard to think of a better way to store a great line.
Very nice.
 

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Dang you, Mike! Tell me... you're pairing the Sharpes with a new Olson?
Hard to think of a better way to store a great line.
Very nice.
Except maybe........>:)
 

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Dang you, Mike! Tell me... you're pairing the Sharpes with a new Olson?
Hard to think of a better way to store a great line.
Very nice.
Not a new Olson, just one out of the quiver that fits pretty good.



An old photo taken before the re-finishing process with old faithful, Olson #010

Rod is now wrapped in bright orange with red trim and interweave ... themed after another old faithful, the Carron.



I have a Gaelforce 54ft 9/10 Equalizer all spooled up and ready for the maiden voyage. Very excited about this :D


Mike
 

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If you want to understand where the difference between Spey lines comes after obvious head length and weight measures the weight difference between rear and front half has huge effect. Coiling both halfs and weighing them on a cup is possible to do very accurately after some practice holding the rest of the line horizontal six inches away in hand so that length mark comes three inches out of cup rim. Thick line sections can be so stiff that you can change scale reading either pushing down or lifting up but watching the reading it is possible to "null" this effect.

When Spey line/head has 70% of its weight on rear half it is very easy and efficient to Spey cast but there also comes difficulties to make the line loop straighten when casting to head wind.

Esa
Finally someone is talking about a more nuanced part of line balance. Dead weight of a line does not tell the whole picture that takes into account rod action and response.

Remember the AFS Floating heads? The back half to front half difference is 20% (60% to 40%). This was always a good start to get the loops dynamics of lines of vogue designs. When I dropped that differential to 10% for the same rod, the loop dynamics suffer. That is characteristic of the AFS dual sink heads, which needed 10% for a heavier front taper to properly sink tip first.

I have played around with this differential and found that faster rods typically need higher differentials. Conversely the differential is less when the rod flexes deeper*. Or else you will find over-stroking to make up for anemic loop dynamics, diverting energy away from the translation speed needed for distance.

* I suspect with deeper action rods, the rod sections and their respective weights takes over some of the function of the driver part of the line. To prove it out, I built a 73' head that is basically a long front taper connected to only a 20 feet -but thicker than usual- rear taper, around 712 grains. It works with the slower action of my 18'2" rod. This driver-less approach gets me a lighter line that gets a chunk of its distance from a deeper rod action.
 
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