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I have never before done any fly tying and am looking to purchase a fly tying kit to get started. I do mostly trout fishing on streams and creeks. Could anyone recommend a good fly tying kit to get started? I have found two kits that I am considering. They are the Deluxe Fly Tying Kit offered by Cabelas and Umpqua's beginning Kit. The details for these kits are as follows:

- The Deluxe Fly-Tying Kit (Cabelas) comes with Jack Dennis' "Western Trout Fly-Tying Manual" Vol. 1 and a two-hour fly-tying basics video.
Kit includes:
Master fly-tying vise; bobbin; hackle pliers; whip finisher; scissors; booklet; two complete rooster necks (brown and black); peacock herl; two gray duck quills; two white duck quills; three bucktail pieces (red, white and yellow); deer body patch; wax; spool of thread; 1-oz. fly-head cement; 100 assorted fly-tying hooks; saddle hackle (red and yellow); grizzly hackle; hare's mask; marabou (white and black); copper wire; gold and silver tinsel; muskrat piece; beaver piece; elk piece (light); assorted dubbing furs (olive, cream, rusty brown); mallard flank; imitation wood duck flank; black floss; black chenille.

- Umpqua's BEGINNER'S FLY TYING KIT This kit gives you everything you need to get started and end up with something to attach to the end of your tippet. No need to shop around, one box includes: fly tying vise, bobbin, hackle pliers, scissors, sample flies, assorted hooks, head cement, tinsel, floss, tying thread, assorted chenille, peacock, Metz® dry fly hackle, assorted marabou, mallard flank feathers, deer body hair, strung saddle hackle, assorted dubbing, calf hair, turkey quill, bucktail pieces and a fly tying instruction book. Get ready to bug out. Complete fly tying set up Includes tying instructions and sample flies Satisfaction guaranteed by Umpqua.

Which of these two kits would be best? They are both priced at $50. Are there other kits I should consider?
 

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Go to your local fly shop...

When I started, I got a kit. I still have some of the stuff from that kit, meaning I'll never use it.

My advice would be to get a serviceable set of vise/tools like the Cabela's Standard Kit ($20.) That vise works fine for starters, I had one that my son uses now.

Then get a good instruction book. The Fly Tier's Benchside reference could be the only book you'd need, but it's pricey at $70 from Amazon. Skip Morris' Fly Tying Made Clear and Simple is good, and will only set you back $15-20. You can get clear and simple and The Complete Book of Fly Tying in a package at amazon for less than $40, and you'll be set.

Then wait for the books to arrive, pick three or four patterns, and go buy materials for those patterns. Then tie, tie, tie...

There's lots more, but I firmly believe a decent set of tools and vise, a good book, and a trip to the local fly shop are the best way to go as opposed to a kit.

Your local shop may even have inexpensive lessons, which are very nice and will speed the learning curve substantially, as well as help you realize that everyone breaks thread, spins wings on to the side and crowds the head...

Welcome to the addiction!

...and I forgot to mention... If you decide you MUST have a kit, I'd vote for the Umpqua one.

-Gus

visit me at: http://home.earthlink.net/~piscator
 

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Get Lessons

Tying can be a lot like spey casting, you can learn to do it with books and videos, but help from someone who knows what they are doing will really shorten the learning curve.

There have to be board members near you who could help you get the basics down.
 

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Ditto the advice about the kits...

... I saw this thread in another area of the forum and was going to comment similarly to t_richerzhagen; the liklihood that you'll actually use most of the materials included in the kits is quite slim. An inexpensive vice, some good instruction, and focus on a handful of patterns, and hence a handful of materials, is a great way to get started. Books and instruction will tell you exactly what you need to tie the patterns, you can get good materials from a local shop, and in the long run you won't be left a slew of stuff that does nothing but clutter up the tying area... well, not yet, anyway. ;)
I started with a $45 knock-off of a regal vice and have been tying on it ever since. Have a look at the poll on yearly expenditures on fly tying materials elsewhere in the Fly Fishing Forum to get an idea of just how addictive tying can become. But hey, at least it's a constructive addiction... :chuckle:
 
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