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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

This past fall my employer sent me out to shoot a few lodges in BC and i was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to put together a youtube video for one of the operations.

We got to fish a couple trophy rainbow trout lakes aswell as 2 beautiful river systems secluded deep in the Cariboo region.

I hope you guys enjoy my video!


This is part 1 of a 2 part series. the next leg of the adventure takes south where we encounter post spawn bull trout and late season cut throat trout in the kootenays.

Thanks for watching,

Dan
 

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Memories...
I used to spend a week each fall at a lodge (well, a very old moose hunting/trap line camp slowly decaying back into the land from which it had been built...) with my father and his brother, both of whom have passed on. If you pulled up a map of the Cariboo region, the lodge would be somewhere in the southeast corner.
There was no guiding other than vague hand-waving and habitual misdirection from the proprietor, but we had access to a large number of beautifully tannin-stained lakes and ponds with Kamloops redbands cruising the weedlines, fattening up for the winter on damsel nymphs, waterboatmen and anything else that moved.
The local lore was that the area had been hand-stocked in the early 1900s and the fish had been self-sustaining since. An old pile of fisheries surveys from the ‘70s covering each little body of water (one bound booklet for each - very cool after-dinner reading) bore this out.
Over the years I caught a small handful of fish that would have made this video‘s highlight reel, and one that towed my float tube around that little pond for what seemed like an eternity as I worked to keep it in open water without putting too much pressure on my 4x tippet. I finally got it to where I could tail it and hoist it into my stripping apron - it hung over substantially on both ends. With a full body convulsion it launched itself up and away, leaving me with a straightened hook and a soaking splash and wondering if that had really just happened.
Haven’t been there in probably ten years. I hope those waters are still producing memories like that.
Jed
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Memories...
I used to spend a week each fall at a lodge (well, a very old moose hunting/trap line camp slowly decaying back into the land from which it had been built...) with my father and his brother, both of whom have passed on. If you pulled up a map of the Cariboo region, the lodge would be somewhere in the southeast corner.
There was no guiding other than vague hand-waving and habitual misdirection from the proprietor, but we had access to a large number of beautifully tannin-stained lakes and ponds with Kamloops redbands cruising the weedlines, fattening up for the winter on damsel nymphs, waterboatmen and anything else that moved.
The local lore was that the area had been hand-stocked in the early 1900s and the fish had been self-sustaining since. An old pile of fisheries surveys from the ‘70s covering each little body of water (one bound booklet for each - very cool after-dinner reading) bore this out.
Over the years I caught a small handful of fish that would have made this video‘s highlight reel, and one that towed my float tube around that little pond for what seemed like an eternity as I worked to keep it in open water without putting too much pressure on my 4x tippet. I finally got it to where I could tail it and hoist it into my stripping apron - it hung over substantially on both ends. With a full body convulsion it launched itself up and away, leaving me with a straightened hook and a soaking splash and wondering if that had really just happened.
Haven’t been there in probably ten years. I hope those waters are still producing memories like that.
Jed
That was a great read Jed.. thank you for that! sounds like the Cariboo region has claimed many hearts through similar adventures! Beautiful.

Dan
 
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