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I haven't really figured out exactly why, but it seems that the major difference is that with a two handed rod a lot of fish are lost when playing them with a vertical rod position as shown in your photo. Did that angler lose that fish? My guess is that they did. It seems more important with the long rod to play the fish from a low rod position, preferably on the down stream side toward your own bank a. k. a. Art Wood.

Speyfithin ith fun!
 

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EAT IT!!!
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With a two hander I seem to be able to ease the fish where I want him to be, rather than fight him (or her) so much. I never seem to break fish off with a two hander, unless I do something super stupid (I may pay for saying [email protected]@!). The whole fight seems a little less chaotic though and maybe a little less violent, as there is just a lot more cushion between you and the fish. Tailing fish is a bunch tougher, but beaching fish is probably about the same. All in all I think I land more fish with a two hander, percentage wise, but that is tough to say. And I agree some of the time about the high rod postiion When the fish is downstream of me, a high rod lifts the fish's head up and more often than not, the hooks come out and in some cases straighten. I find this to be the case with single hand rods and trout, as well as steelhead and two handers. A low rod is a big key when the fish is down stream. Normally when I keep the rod low, well bent, and angled upstream, the fish steadily come back to me by simply reeling. When a fish is deep and across the river from me, a high rod is helpful for preventing the line from getting caught on rocks, logs and other evil crud. I have seldom had fish spit hooks in this position. Lastly, when I stick a screamer, that runs well downstream of me (I like screamers:D ) I keep the rod up to help clear obstructions until they settle down, or I get close enough to pressure the fish. When the fish calms, I go back to the low rod, unless I am still chasing it to close the distance, in which case I keep the rod high.
 

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All goo points. Just to add one more.

With a 'longer rod/shorter line,' in shallower water steelhead have a greater tendency to go 'air-borne' on you. Short straight line with a 'hot fish' for me it's almost a given I'll have a 'long range release.'

Get caught in this situation (and you will), as they say in salt water fishing: 'bow to the fish.' e.g. Drop your rod tip, and then get it low as practical to keep line in the water. The line in the water can act as a good 'shock absorber' for these kinds of 'fishie behavior.'

But, why can't I remember to do all this when I see the line ripping towards the surface?
:eek:
 

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Less hurried

well with atlantic salmon ,it is less hurried ,or so it seems maybe its me but it is so much more relaxed than the hustle I have with fish on a short rod ,still the fish do hit the bank for C+R rather quickly ,unlike some friends who forget they are fishing a big bit of kit which will subdue a 30 lber in a short time .
 

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Control Again

Ann - great place to fish, from the picture. As already mentioned the ability to keep the line off rocks and other obstructions is a big advantage. Then keep it "down and dirty", as the saltwater folks call it. I think I land a higher percentage to the two handed rod.
 

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I agree with Brian. You have a great deal of control over the fish with a spey rod. Much more so than with a single-handed rod. Actually, everyone had some good points on fish fighting. And that pool, Still pool on the York, is one of my favorite’s.

Charlie.
:D
 
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