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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I am interested to pick up spey casting. I only started fly fishing last year and starting to get a reasonable handle on single handed casting. I currently have Winston BIIx 4wt 9’ and a BIIx 6 wt 9’ and I am really happy with those rods. I used also an XP 896 to do some salmon fishing and enjoyed how it handled the 8wt Rio Versitip with the sink tips. I decided to replace the XP with a Spey or Switch rod.

I am looking for:

Fishing for: Coho, Sockeye, Pink, less emphasis of specifically targeting Spring and Chum, Steelhead (Winter & Summer), Cutthroat in bigger rivers such as Harrison

Rivers: Vedder, Chehalis, Stave, Harrison, Squamish,some of the Washington Steelhead rivers (but less likely due to family commitments)

Beach casting close to my place. The beach has generally a good tidal flow right along the beach and behaves in many ways like a river unfortunately with some waves. Generally I would try to target Salmon from the beach. The commercial fishery drags their nets within a few feet of the beach.

I am close to the mouth of the Fraser and may consider trying to cast there as well. Generally the **** makes back casts difficult in many section thus spey casting would come in handy.

I have never Spey cast yet and just started to watch the Rio Modern Spey Casting.

I am heavily debating if I want a Switch rod or a "real" Spey rod. I realize that it should be harder to learn spey casting on a switch rod, but I had little difficulty to learn the basic single handed casting.

I tried the T&T 1107-3 and found the deep bend actually nice to cast single handed (using a WF9wt line at M&Y in Vancouver), but the rod felt quite heavy. It was so easy to throw 70ft of line without hauling.

I like the idea of being able to single-hand cast. I am not sure if I would regret a Switch rod in the long term (too heavy single handed and too short for good spey casting).

Generally I seem to prefer medium fast to fast action rods, but had no issues casting slower rods like the BIIt. The T&T felt neat with a very distinctive load, but required my timing to slow way down.

I don’t have yet a preference in terms of which Spey casting style I want to pursue. Any thoughts on what style to start with?

I would appreciate some feedback from you on which rods I should consider for my application and what line weight. I heard great things about the Meiser rods and contacted Bob. Bob's recommendation was to go with a Spey rod rather than a switch rod. He suggested from his rods the 12’6” 4 pc Highlander 7/8 or 13’6” 4 pc 7/8 MKS.

Price is not as important as a good rod for the long term. Unfortunately it is diffuclt to judge what rod to get without reasonble spey casting ability.

One of the local shops is putting a spey clinic together on Jan 27th which I hope to attend and try some different rods.

Any feedback on switch rods or first spey rods (you never regret) is appreciated.

Thanks,

FlyfisherX
 

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If it were me I would keep the 896 XP as a beach rod and all around single hander for salmon/steelhead.It's a great rod for coho(where you will usually be stripping in flies) and small to medium size salmon & steelies.

Rather than a "switch rod",I would get a nice all around two hander to compliment your current single handers.Something that is versatile,easy to learn on,and not too heavy would be the way to go IMHO.A 13ft-13ft6 8wt rod(the 13ft6 7/8 or 8/9 Meiser MKS would make a GREAT choice) is ideal for the rivers in southern BC and would also work well for trips up north.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi TonyD,

This is also one option what I considered. Having more rods is always nice, but I am somewhat limited on what I can currently aquire. I would like to learn how to spey cast and the XP is certainly not the best choice to learn. I have considered the Meiser rods as they seem to get great reviews. I hope to get a better idea on what I want after getting a Spey lession.

Andreas
 

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Dana

is close and a great instructor. He also will have a selection of rods and lines that you could try out.
 

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I second the recommendation that a single-hander is often a good choice for silvers and pinks, especially if they're holding in frog water like they so often love to.

That being said, at some point a 2-hander is going to be a great setup for fishing the rivers you are near, especially for steelhead, chums, and kings. Something like a 13-14' 8-wt is a good all-around choice for everything but kings over 20 lbs. Go to a couple claves, get some lessons, and try to find some buddies that are "into" the 2-hander deal. Make sure you like it before you take the leap (almost everybody does after trying it, it's a lot like crack cocaine, the first hit is free the rest will cost you). You should be able to find a used set-up at some point, be it on the classifieds at a forum, e-bay, or a local shop, most of the rods out there are decent as long as you put the correct line on them. And if you buy something used at a good deal it should hold its value unlike brand new stuff that loses 30% the day you walk out the shop. If you decide to buy new there are some less expensive options out there, do your homework and ask around before making the plunge in either case.

The "switch" rods are a decent compromise but they don't have quite the same feel that the traditional 2-handers do. It's a trade-off but these rods are kind of "nichey" and the single hander/double hander combo will probably be able cover more situations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi everyone,

I agree that the combination on single and double hander(s) seems likely to be the best choice and I expect that I will end up there in any case. I will need to make a decision on what to buy first as there is only one new setup in the near future.

FlyfisherX
 
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