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I'm working on getting some extra distance on my single spey and switch casts. Currently I'm (comfortably) throwing around 85-100 feet of GrandSpey line off of a Winston DBF 9wt. That's the head plus some shooting line with the occasional shot that'll take most of the running line. I'm trying to turn those occasional glimpses of greatness into a more consistent stroke but I just don't feel that I'm able to get enough line speed to suck the rest of the running line out the majority of the time and things fall apart when forced (of course).

I see a lot of folks on this board talking the talk, and have seen the real pros do it, just would like to know any more tips other than practice, practice, practice. Thanks.

-Chris
 

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Pullin' Thread
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I fish the GrandSpey lines nearly exclusively anymore and it is the only line I use on my T&T 1611 and 1510-3 rods because it turns over sink tips so well. I use the 9/10 GS on the 1611 and the 8/9 GS on the 1510 because I found if I use the 10/11 Gs on the 11 wt 1611, it overloads the rod, feels heavy as a result, and cuts down on distance. If you are using the 8/9 GS on your DB 8/9 rod, it will be a bit overloaded and that would take energy out of your cast and slow line speed. The 7/8 GS is a far better match on your DB 8/9 rod.

I assume you are starting your forward casting motion prior to the line anchoring. If you aren't doing this, you should because it keeps the line speed up by preventing the rod from stopping and partially unloading when forming the D Loop. Also, I assume you are energizing the D Loop with enough force to have it form a V instead of a D, and that the anchor is within a rod length of your body upstream and within a rod length out from your body.

Other than keeping these things in mind, practice is all I know that works to get consistent with distance casting.
 

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Extra distance

Not being able to see your casting style I can suggest a couple of things to help. Do a body rock, slip your shoulders back and look over your casting shoulder to help increase the length of your casting stroke. As Flytyer said, forward stroke should begin just prior to the line anchoring. Practice.
Leroy........................
 

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Wilson Grand Spey Distance

With the Grand Spey Lines, it is critical that after each use, you rinse off the line and then clean it.

I got out of the habit of cleaning my Spey Lines as I wasn't "Shooting the Grand Speys and Mid Speys".

Then, someone posted that we need to really clean these longer lines. I went back to cleaning the line after each use and the rinse.

That has added distance to my casts and made the single and double spey casts easier to cast as well as the snake roll.

When you think of the amount line that is out with the longer head lines, you have a lot of line developing surface tension. If you have entire head out of your tip or most of it, that is a lot of line to lift and drag through the water. If it is dirty, that task becomes harder due to increased water tension.

I have been using 303 Aerospace Protectant on fly lines for about a decade. It has never harmed a line and makes them very slick.

This is the same product that Orvis repackages sells as a line cleaner for about a decade. I buy the 303 Aerospace Protectant in the 8 ounce pump spray bottle for about $7/bottle at our local RV/Boat supply store. That is about 1/3 the Orvis price. We use it on lawn chairs, our Weber charcoal and other outdoor furniture and gear.

I have a laundry basket that I use for cleaning my lines. I leave the reel on the butt section of the rod and run the entire line through an old all cotton t shirt (don't use polyester, it will scratch the line) that has a good bit of of the 303 sprayed in on the area I pull the line through. I run the clean line into the basket like it was a shooting basket, and then I reel in back in for the final cleaning. The laundry basket keeps the line in one spot and prevents tangles/knots.

Then, I spray some 303 on a clean spot on the t shirt and reel the line in holding the t shirt and line between my knees. Even with a Grand Spey, it takes just a few minute for this process.

Then you have a clean line. Yesterday I used an Air Flow single hand fly line that I cleaned 4 years ago with Mize's 5/6 switch rod. It shot and lifted as well as my new W/C 5/6 which was cleaned last fall with the 303.

I keep a small spray bottle in the back of my suv if I'm fishing in some really dirty water. You can feel the drag building up if the water has a lot algae and dirt in it. Instead of the laundry basket, I use the tailgate on my Bronco.
 

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The key elements of a distance spey cast is a long flat sweep into the D loop the flatter the sweep the more compressed the D loop will be it should almost come under the rod tip with minimal splash down of the line anchor.Then you can now drift backwards and upwards.This now gives you maximum lead and rod movement for your forward cast,upper body movement is also a key factor in providing a long smooth stroke.I have found the angle of the rod handle quite important at this stage ie let the bottom hand drift .outward enough for you to compress the rod.If done correctly as you stop the rod on the forward stroke the rod tip should deflect in almost the same horizontal path as you want the line to travel this can be the difference between a 100ft cast and 140ft cast as you are using all the energy thats stored in the rod correctly. (watch for for the line nosediving just after the rod tip as you stop it this will tell you where the tip is going ) hope this helps a bit A.TOFT.
 

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Andrew,

Welcome to the Spey Pages! We look forward to more of your insights. See you at Spey-O-Rama.
 

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Coast2coast Flyfishaholic
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Excellent description, thank you Andrew.
 
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