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Discussion Starter #1
I certainly don't expect everyone to agree with me but as someone who has been steelheading in waders for over 30 years i think waders just leak. Brand new simms you get about a year maybe a little more of hard use and you start getting little leaks, leaks that leave your fleece a little damp. fix what you can and just chock the rest up to the cost of being a steelheader, wear the right stuff underneath and you'll be ok maybe a tiny bit cold but that's just steelheading..
My leaky Seal Dry latex waders gave me toe nail fungus in the late 1980s. :-( Took me decades to finally get rid of it.

If any of you have toe nail fungus, pull a chair up to the wood stove; I might have some ideas on how to get rid of it, and how to avoid having it return.

These days, I buy only expensive Gore-Tex waders with excellent warranties and service. Sometimes, the socks will get damp from hiking. I pay careful attention in case it is a leak.

As required, the waders are gently pulled inside out in order to completely and thoroughly dry. They also get occasionally washed. I have in the past lightly applied Lysol aerosol to the inner boot when still waging the epic battle with toe nail fungus. Arrrgh.

If I cannot easily fix the leak, in the waders go for warranty repair, or what is often the case, warranty replacement.


Thankfully most anglers do not understand insurance economics. They seem to have no idea whatsoever as to how they are cross-subsidizing my passion and the passion of other keen, hard-hiking, aggressive wading anglers.
 

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If any of you have toe nail fungus, pull a chair up to the wood stove; I might have some ideas on how to get rid of it, and how to avoid having it return.
I'm all ears. I'm also getting toasty warm next to the stove. Tried the $$$ pills and the wife's tea tree oil treatment. Still have the fungus amongus.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Toe nail fungus strategy

I'm all ears. I'm also getting toasty warm next to the stove. Tried the $$$ pills and the wife's tea tree oil treatment. Still have the fungus amongus.
Tea tree oil might reduce athlete's foot but seems to be ineffective for toe nail fungus. I tried it with no progress.

I would avoid pills. Potential side effects. I did Lamisil tablets twice; it beat back the fungus but did not kill it all. Lamisil can produce nasty side effects.

1. Carefully, patiently, cut, sand paper and file the infected nail way back to a very thin bed. I used an electric sander to begin with. You may prefer a slower approach. This step is absolutely key.

2. Apply Lamisil cream daily to the nail and surrounding toes. Lamisil applied topically does not appear to have the same side effects as orally ingested Lamisil (terbinafine).

If you have fungus on your foot, apply a thin film of Lamisil all over the foot.

I would also daily soak the affected toe along with the rest of the foot in vinegar. Fungus does not usually tolerate an acidic environment.

Spray the insides of your shoes, boots and wader socks with Lysol Disinfectant.

In general, keep your feet clean and dry. Think about wearing light wool socks in a sandal shoe configuration. Lose the cotton socks.

If you have diabetes or liver issues, you probably should consult a podiatrist or other qualified physician before proceeding even with just a topical application of Lamisil cream.

A few years ago, I went to see a podiatrist for plantar faciitis for an injury that resulted from scrambling down steep rip-rap rock of the kind you might find along a steelhead river near a logging road....

Nice chap from Colorado. He prescribed Lamisil cream for the observed athlete's foot and I believe that is what ultimately finished the toe nail fungus off.

Being a little crazy and desperate I might have on occasion layed down a base of DMSO gel on the infected toe nail bed before applying the Lamisil cream. DMSO is a good transport agent. It also has anti-inflammatory properties appreciated by horses and rock climbers alike. :) You probably should not use DMSO gel unless you are literally healthy as a horse and willing to experiment.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Mike. Go head, enjoy the humour!

Problem is that you can keep yourself absolutely free of 'toe jam' and still get toe nail fungus.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
No longer a thread hijack

Thanks. Will try.

Sorry for the hijack to the others!!!!
You are welcome. Thanks to Mike for carving these posts off.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Stumpy,

A couple of more items I had forgotten until I went rummaging through that part of the bathroom for something else.

I used Uremol Cream (Urea 20%) mixed up by a pharmacist to soften the toe nail bed. The idea is to make it easier for the vinegar or Lamisil cream to penetrate the nail bed.

In passing, you could probably kill accessible fungus by soaking your toes or feet in urine..... though I cannot imagine that remedy being overly popular.

At the recommendation of the podiastrist, I sprayed Dove Men Care Dry on the affect bare foot before putting on socks. It is essentially unscented deodorant.

Once again at the recommendation of the podiatrist, I would occasionally sprinkle Tinactin Antifungal powder for Athelete's foot in my footware. This and the last treatment targeted the athlete's foot which often if not almost always accompanies toe nail fungus.

The short, expeditious cure is to either rip your toe nail bed out or have it surgically removed. I opted not to go this route.
 

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Mindless Wanderer
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Effects of leaking waders...wet socks, and very pale, wrinkly feet and toes.;)
 

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Mindless Wanderer
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Are you aware of any testimonial evidence that the UV light is effective?
 

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Mindless Wanderer
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@ENSO...I have had my toenail ripped out to correct an ingrown toenail, and I can attest to the fact that it was FAR more painful than my open heart surgery. In fact, it was the most painful event I have suffered in my many years. NOT going anywhere near that one again.:eek:
 

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Having read through the posts, I would have thought in healthy individuals the effect of leaking waders would be…wet feet.

The issues discussed, although most informative, may well relate to a pre-existing fungal infection made worse by damp/wet footwear.

Wet feet for long periods are prone, surprisingly enough, to 'trench foot' as some who stand in muddy/wet fields for days on end at music festivals can attest.

Malcolm
 

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Mindless Wanderer
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I did and found little to unequivocally support the use, where at best it was mentioned that UV-C was being used, with very little data reported but with a hopeful medical community. Only the Veterans Administration mentioned any test results - which was highly favorable, I might add, with 15 of 18 patients showing a reduction in toenail fungus but only one being cured. Bottom line...probably worth a try, but consumer products being considered for this use need to be in the form of a wand and the best price I found at Amazon was $75 plus $8.95 shipping (no Prime). Unfortunately they rated just 2.9 out of 5 stars. Most consumer UV-C products are for disinfecting the air in rooms and just aren't suited for treating the nail fungus.

I would note for those interested, that UV-A and UV-B are both unhealthy for this use, as they kill all the cells not just the nail fungus.
 

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In my search for info on the use of UV light to cure nail fungus I came upon another VA study wherein Vick's Vaporub was used to great effect. When applied each morning to the infected area it showed positive results, though the info didn't go any further in explaining the data or final test determination. At $5 a jar, this one looks like an affordable game changer should one like to run around with greasy, squishy feet. Sounds good to me.:laugh:
 

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JD
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I thought this was going to be a discussion on the negative physiological effects of fishing in leaky waders, to which I can attest are not to be taken lightly. :tsk_tsk:

I've seen the vinegar mix treatment on you tube. I am amazed at how many times you tube has bailed me out of problems that could have cost big bucks had I not been able to fix it myself. Long story short though, once the fungus had been eradicated, the infected nail has to grow out before the fungus is completely eliminated.

Back to the issue at hand, foot care is not to be taken lightly, & I've probably commited most of the common mistakes. Wet wading, in boots or sandals, every conceivable type of sock known to man, the evolution of waders from seal dries to the latest greatest breathable's, you name it. Fishing with wet feet & soggy, stinky socks is not fun! Besides our own perspiration, there is all kinds of bad stuff in the lakes & rivers we fish.

The best solution I've found to date is polypropylene liner socks under Merino wool socks, good fitting boots with ample toe wiggle room & above all, water tight waders. To that end, my current fix is an expensive back up pair of waders to fill in while the good pair is being fixed. And don't waste too much time beating a dead horse. When it's time to trash them, trash them & move on.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I tried the Vicks Vaporub cure. Did not seem to help much. Though it may have helped with the superficial fungus.

I believe that vinegar mixed in water did help.

JDJones: Yes. A backup pair of quality waders is essential. Once the main pair starts to leak, it is time to either get them fixed or replace them. If you fish, hike and wade hard, expensive brand name waders with a solid warranty are an excellent cost-effective idea.
 
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